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All (62)

All (62) (0 to 10 of 62 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2022001
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Statistics Canada Longitudinal Worker File linked to Canadian census records to examine the impact of firm closures and involuntary job loss on entry into gig work. The analysis distinguishes between the actions of those who experienced an actual layoff associated with a firm closure and those who worked in a closing firm but did not necessarily wait until the closure (“impending layoff”).

    Release date: 2022-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200600003
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of Canadian workers lose their job. The opportunities for coping with job loss through postsecondary education (PSE) transitions might be unequally distributed across Canadian families, perhaps even more so than across Canadian workers. Using data from Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File (LWF), the T1 Family File (T1FF), the Post-Secondary Information System (PSIS), and the 2006 Census of Population, this study quantifies the degree to which the likelihood of entering PSE or a new field of study after job loss varies, all else equal, across types of family units and, among dual-earner couples, with the earnings or the risk of job loss of the spouse.

    Release date: 2022-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200002
    Description:

    This Insights article examines the degree to which workers who lost their job in 2009 started a business, changed regions, went back to school or began a registered apprenticeship in 2010, the year following job loss. The analysis combines the 2001 Census of Population with Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File and Registered Apprenticeship Information System.

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    In recent years, technological advancements in artificial intelligence and machine learning have broadened the realm of tasks that have the potential to be accomplished through automation technology. Consequently, these developments have raised questions about the future of work. Debate on this issue has focused primarily on the risk of job loss attributable to automation, with less attention given to how automation may change the nature of workers’ jobs. This study employs a task-based approach that shifts the focus from job replacement to changes in the nature of Canadians’ work. This approach views occupations as a set of tasks, allowing researchers to assess the effects of automation in the context of changes in occupational tasks.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020023
    Description:

    Efforts to make a transition to a low carbon economy have raised concerns that workers displaced from traditional energy-producing sectors might experience substantial earnings declines after job loss.

    Using data from a rich administrative dataset, this study documents the employment and earnings trajectories of coal miners who were displaced during the late 1990s and the 2000s.

    Release date: 2020-12-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020068
    Description: Efforts to make a transition to a low carbon economy have raised concerns that workers displaced from traditional energy-producing sectors might experience substantial earnings declines after job loss. Using data from a rich administrative dataset, this infographic documents the employment and earnings trajectories of oil and gas workers who were displaced from 1995 to 2016.
    Release date: 2020-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020015
    Description:

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence and machine-learning technologies have fuelled fears of potential job losses among some workers. While the net impact of new technology on total jobs can be negative, positive or neutral, some workers may be more affected than others depending on how easily robots and algorithms can replace them, or how easily their skills complement the new technology. In the case of women and men, it is not clear who is likely to be most affected. This study estimates the risk of job transformation as a result of automation technology faced by women and men.

    Release date: 2020-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020021
    Description:

    The last two decades have seen substantial movements in the price of oil and other commodities. Oil prices more than doubled from the early 2000s to 2008, fell during the 2008-2009 recession and dropped sharply after 2014. These price declines have led to increases in permanent layoff rates in the oil and gas industry in Canada, especially in recent years. This Economic Insights article examines how workers displaced from the oil and gas industry in recent years have fared after job loss. The analysis uses Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File.

    Release date: 2020-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020022
    Description:

    Efforts to make a transition to a low carbon economy have raised concerns that workers displaced from traditional energy-producing sectors might experience substantial earnings declines after job loss. This Economic Insights article examines how workers displaced from coal mining in recent years have fared after job loss. The analysis uses Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File.

    Release date: 2020-09-22

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100070
    Description:

    During the widespread lockdown of economic activities in March and April 2020, the Canadian labour market lost 3 million jobs. From May to July, as many businesses gradually resumed their operations, 1.7 million jobs were recovered. While studies in the United States and Europe suggest that immigrants are often more severely affected by economic downturns than the native born, little is known about whether immigrants and the Canadian born fared differently in the employment disruption induced by the COVID-19 pandemic and, if so, how such differences are related to their socio-demographic and job characteristics. This paper fills this gap by comparing immigrants and the Canadian-born population in their transitions out of employment in the months of heavy contraction and into employment during the months of partial recovery.

    Release date: 2020-08-20
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Public use microdata: 89M0030X
    Description:

    The Survey of Older Workers (SOW) is a survey that was conducted in October and November of 2008 .The survey was conducted on behalf of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada with the objective to develop a statistical database providing estimates surrounding the issues of work and retirement as perceived by older workers in the 10 provinces. The fundamental objective of the SOW is an attempt to understand the components that are integral in the decision to either continue working or retire. In essence we are trying to obtain a better understanding of factors that are driving the decisions of older workers in regards to working and retirement.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Table: 71-001-P
    Description:

    This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.

    Release date: 2002-08-09
Analysis (59)

Analysis (59) (0 to 10 of 59 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2022001
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Statistics Canada Longitudinal Worker File linked to Canadian census records to examine the impact of firm closures and involuntary job loss on entry into gig work. The analysis distinguishes between the actions of those who experienced an actual layoff associated with a firm closure and those who worked in a closing firm but did not necessarily wait until the closure (“impending layoff”).

    Release date: 2022-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200600003
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of Canadian workers lose their job. The opportunities for coping with job loss through postsecondary education (PSE) transitions might be unequally distributed across Canadian families, perhaps even more so than across Canadian workers. Using data from Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File (LWF), the T1 Family File (T1FF), the Post-Secondary Information System (PSIS), and the 2006 Census of Population, this study quantifies the degree to which the likelihood of entering PSE or a new field of study after job loss varies, all else equal, across types of family units and, among dual-earner couples, with the earnings or the risk of job loss of the spouse.

    Release date: 2022-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200002
    Description:

    This Insights article examines the degree to which workers who lost their job in 2009 started a business, changed regions, went back to school or began a registered apprenticeship in 2010, the year following job loss. The analysis combines the 2001 Census of Population with Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File and Registered Apprenticeship Information System.

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    In recent years, technological advancements in artificial intelligence and machine learning have broadened the realm of tasks that have the potential to be accomplished through automation technology. Consequently, these developments have raised questions about the future of work. Debate on this issue has focused primarily on the risk of job loss attributable to automation, with less attention given to how automation may change the nature of workers’ jobs. This study employs a task-based approach that shifts the focus from job replacement to changes in the nature of Canadians’ work. This approach views occupations as a set of tasks, allowing researchers to assess the effects of automation in the context of changes in occupational tasks.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020023
    Description:

    Efforts to make a transition to a low carbon economy have raised concerns that workers displaced from traditional energy-producing sectors might experience substantial earnings declines after job loss.

    Using data from a rich administrative dataset, this study documents the employment and earnings trajectories of coal miners who were displaced during the late 1990s and the 2000s.

    Release date: 2020-12-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020068
    Description: Efforts to make a transition to a low carbon economy have raised concerns that workers displaced from traditional energy-producing sectors might experience substantial earnings declines after job loss. Using data from a rich administrative dataset, this infographic documents the employment and earnings trajectories of oil and gas workers who were displaced from 1995 to 2016.
    Release date: 2020-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020015
    Description:

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence and machine-learning technologies have fuelled fears of potential job losses among some workers. While the net impact of new technology on total jobs can be negative, positive or neutral, some workers may be more affected than others depending on how easily robots and algorithms can replace them, or how easily their skills complement the new technology. In the case of women and men, it is not clear who is likely to be most affected. This study estimates the risk of job transformation as a result of automation technology faced by women and men.

    Release date: 2020-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020021
    Description:

    The last two decades have seen substantial movements in the price of oil and other commodities. Oil prices more than doubled from the early 2000s to 2008, fell during the 2008-2009 recession and dropped sharply after 2014. These price declines have led to increases in permanent layoff rates in the oil and gas industry in Canada, especially in recent years. This Economic Insights article examines how workers displaced from the oil and gas industry in recent years have fared after job loss. The analysis uses Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File.

    Release date: 2020-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020022
    Description:

    Efforts to make a transition to a low carbon economy have raised concerns that workers displaced from traditional energy-producing sectors might experience substantial earnings declines after job loss. This Economic Insights article examines how workers displaced from coal mining in recent years have fared after job loss. The analysis uses Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File.

    Release date: 2020-09-22

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100070
    Description:

    During the widespread lockdown of economic activities in March and April 2020, the Canadian labour market lost 3 million jobs. From May to July, as many businesses gradually resumed their operations, 1.7 million jobs were recovered. While studies in the United States and Europe suggest that immigrants are often more severely affected by economic downturns than the native born, little is known about whether immigrants and the Canadian born fared differently in the employment disruption induced by the COVID-19 pandemic and, if so, how such differences are related to their socio-demographic and job characteristics. This paper fills this gap by comparing immigrants and the Canadian-born population in their transitions out of employment in the months of heavy contraction and into employment during the months of partial recovery.

    Release date: 2020-08-20
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

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