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All (9)

All (9) ((9 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154980
    Description:

    This study explores the association between job flexibility and job satisfaction, for men and women aged 18 to 64, using data from the 2014 Longitudinal and International Study of Adults. Control over four aspects of job flexibility are considered: the order of work, how to do the work, the speed of work, and the hours of work.

    Release date: 2018-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016385
    Description:

    This study contributes to the debate about the role of self-employment in helping women improve family–work balance by offering Canadian evidence from a uniquely rich dataset that links individual records from the 2006 Census of Population to records from the 2011 National Household Survey. Unlike most previous studies estimating the determinants of women’s self-employment, the analysis focuses directly on transitions from wage employment to self-employment among new mothers.

    Release date: 2016-11-25

  • Stats in brief: 89-652-X2016003
    Description:

    This fact sheet examines the satisfaction with work-life balance of mothers and fathers of children aged 17 and under who work full-time.

    Release date: 2016-04-14

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20010046315
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article describes the characteristics of shift workers and compares stress factors and health behaviours of shift and regular daytime workers. Based on an analysis of people followed over four years, associations between shift work and the incidence of chronic conditions and changes in psychological distress levels are explored.

    Release date: 2002-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1998014
    Description:

    This paper compares hours worked obtained from two different surveys: the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the Labour Force Survey (LFS) in order to evaluate the quality of the data from each survey.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970043384
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although two-thirds of workers are satisfied with their hours, many of the remainder would prefer to work more hours for more pay. This article analyzes work hour preferences by sex, province, job characteristics and family situation. (Adapted froman Analytical Studies Branch research paper published in May1997.)

    Release date: 1997-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997104
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Faced with high unemployment rates, an unequal distribution of worktime, and shifts to temporary, part-time and contract employment, Canadian workers may prefer to change their work hours. Using data from the Survey of Work Arrangements of 1995, we find that two thirds of Canadian workers are satisfied with their work hours. The majority of workers who are not satisfied would prefer more hours for more pay rather than fewer hours for less pay. This finding is robust as it holds for each age group, education level, seniority level, industrial and occupational group. Workers most likely to want more work hours are generally young, have low levels of education, have little seniority, hold temporary jobs, work short hours and are employed in low-skill occupations. Workers who are the most likely to desire a shorter work week are professionals, managers, and natural and social science workers, have high hourly wage rates, possess high levels of education, have long job tenure, occupy permanent jobs and already work long hours. Calculations based on the Survey on Work Reduction of 1985 suggest that if Canadian workers were to voluntarily reduce their work week, the number of work hours available for redistribution would unlikely be sufficient to both eliminate underemployment and reduce unemployment. The potential for work time redistribution, as measured by the propensity to desire fewer hours, appears to be greatest (lowest) in age-education groups with relatively low (high) unemployment rates. This implies that the resulting decrease in unemployment and underemployment could be more pronounced in groups where workers are already relatively successful.

    Release date: 1997-05-13

  • 9. Working "9 to 5" Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X1994002117
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An analysis of the characteristics of full-time paid workers with fixed daytime schedules.

    Release date: 1994-06-01
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12
Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) ((8 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154980
    Description:

    This study explores the association between job flexibility and job satisfaction, for men and women aged 18 to 64, using data from the 2014 Longitudinal and International Study of Adults. Control over four aspects of job flexibility are considered: the order of work, how to do the work, the speed of work, and the hours of work.

    Release date: 2018-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016385
    Description:

    This study contributes to the debate about the role of self-employment in helping women improve family–work balance by offering Canadian evidence from a uniquely rich dataset that links individual records from the 2006 Census of Population to records from the 2011 National Household Survey. Unlike most previous studies estimating the determinants of women’s self-employment, the analysis focuses directly on transitions from wage employment to self-employment among new mothers.

    Release date: 2016-11-25

  • Stats in brief: 89-652-X2016003
    Description:

    This fact sheet examines the satisfaction with work-life balance of mothers and fathers of children aged 17 and under who work full-time.

    Release date: 2016-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20010046315
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article describes the characteristics of shift workers and compares stress factors and health behaviours of shift and regular daytime workers. Based on an analysis of people followed over four years, associations between shift work and the incidence of chronic conditions and changes in psychological distress levels are explored.

    Release date: 2002-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1998014
    Description:

    This paper compares hours worked obtained from two different surveys: the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the Labour Force Survey (LFS) in order to evaluate the quality of the data from each survey.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970043384
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although two-thirds of workers are satisfied with their hours, many of the remainder would prefer to work more hours for more pay. This article analyzes work hour preferences by sex, province, job characteristics and family situation. (Adapted froman Analytical Studies Branch research paper published in May1997.)

    Release date: 1997-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997104
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Faced with high unemployment rates, an unequal distribution of worktime, and shifts to temporary, part-time and contract employment, Canadian workers may prefer to change their work hours. Using data from the Survey of Work Arrangements of 1995, we find that two thirds of Canadian workers are satisfied with their work hours. The majority of workers who are not satisfied would prefer more hours for more pay rather than fewer hours for less pay. This finding is robust as it holds for each age group, education level, seniority level, industrial and occupational group. Workers most likely to want more work hours are generally young, have low levels of education, have little seniority, hold temporary jobs, work short hours and are employed in low-skill occupations. Workers who are the most likely to desire a shorter work week are professionals, managers, and natural and social science workers, have high hourly wage rates, possess high levels of education, have long job tenure, occupy permanent jobs and already work long hours. Calculations based on the Survey on Work Reduction of 1985 suggest that if Canadian workers were to voluntarily reduce their work week, the number of work hours available for redistribution would unlikely be sufficient to both eliminate underemployment and reduce unemployment. The potential for work time redistribution, as measured by the propensity to desire fewer hours, appears to be greatest (lowest) in age-education groups with relatively low (high) unemployment rates. This implies that the resulting decrease in unemployment and underemployment could be more pronounced in groups where workers are already relatively successful.

    Release date: 1997-05-13

  • 8. Working "9 to 5" Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X1994002117
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An analysis of the characteristics of full-time paid workers with fixed daytime schedules.

    Release date: 1994-06-01
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