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All (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019026
    Description:

    The survey, which addresses child care in Canada for children younger than 6 years old, asks about the different types of early learning and child care arrangements that families use, difficulties some families may face when looking for care, as well as reasons for not using child care.

    Release date: 2019-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2011 General Social Survey (GSS) on Families, this report provides an overview of child care in Canada, examining its overall use, factors influencing use, types of child care arrangements, and cost.

    Release date: 2014-10-30

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • 5. Métis ChildrenArchived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • 6. Inuit ChildrenArchived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Table: 89-634-X2008005
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Table: 89-628-X2008010
    Description:

    This fourth set of tables presents a series that examines how caring for a child with a disability influences the family unit, and more specifically, the parents who care for them. Such as household income, health and stress, employment and finances, marital relationships, and childcare arrangements.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005001
    Description:

    This paper provides some guidance to users on the use of medians and also gives some examples of situations when it can be a more appropriate measure than the average.

    Release date: 2005-05-17

  • Table: 97F0013X
    Description:

    The tables under the topic "Canada's Workforce: Unpaid Work" present data on the unpaid work of the Canadian workforce, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care, and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyze the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyze how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.

    Release date: 2004-03-25
Data (5)

Data (5) ((5 results))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Table: 89-634-X2008005
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Table: 89-628-X2008010
    Description:

    This fourth set of tables presents a series that examines how caring for a child with a disability influences the family unit, and more specifically, the parents who care for them. Such as household income, health and stress, employment and finances, marital relationships, and childcare arrangements.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Table: 97F0013X
    Description:

    The tables under the topic "Canada's Workforce: Unpaid Work" present data on the unpaid work of the Canadian workforce, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care, and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyze the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyze how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 62-010-X
    Description:

    The publication highlights current and historical statistics on consumer prices and related price indexes. A comparative index contains retail price differentials for 11 major cities by selected groups of consumer goods and services.

    Release date: 1999-08-03
Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019026
    Description:

    The survey, which addresses child care in Canada for children younger than 6 years old, asks about the different types of early learning and child care arrangements that families use, difficulties some families may face when looking for care, as well as reasons for not using child care.

    Release date: 2019-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2011 General Social Survey (GSS) on Families, this report provides an overview of child care in Canada, examining its overall use, factors influencing use, types of child care arrangements, and cost.

    Release date: 2014-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • 4. Métis ChildrenArchived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • 5. Inuit ChildrenArchived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006681
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article focuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035371
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Changing the focus - from the individual to the family, from one week to one year - can dramatically alter perceptions of unemployment. This article compares alternative measures with the official rate over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990044910
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at how the types of conjugal unions women enter have changed, it examines whether starting life together in a common-law union influences the chances of the relationship breaking up.

    Release date: 2000-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990024732
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines changes in hospital separations of children aged 1 to 14 between 1986/87 and 1996/97. It focuses on four common causes of childhood hospitalization: asthma, chronic disease of tonsils and adenoids, fractures, and acute appendicitis.

    Release date: 1999-11-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0117X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report outlines some initial results from the School Component of the first and second cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). It examines the longitudinal influence of Early Childhood Care and Education and literacy activities on young children's future academic and cognitive outcomes. This overview highlights the information newly available from this component of the survey; it is not comprehensive in its coverage or its analysis. Indeed, the information collected by the NLSCY is so rich and detailed that researchers and analysts will be using it to address a variety of important questions concerning the education of children and youth in Canada for many years to come. Here then, we are merely scratching the surface to stimulate awareness of this rich new data source, and to illustrate the kinds of analyses it makes possible.

    Release date: 1999-10-14
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

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