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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154978
    Description:

    More and more Canadians are pursuing graduate studies, often to increase their chances of getting a better-paying job. Using data from the 2016 Census, this study examines the extent to which median earnings of workers with a master’s degree or doctorate differ from their counterparts with a bachelor’s degree, focusing on differences across fields of study. The target population includes paid employees aged 30 to 59 who worked full year and full time during the year preceding the census, and whose highest educational qualification was obtained in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-09-26

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016023
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article compares the earnings of young bachelor’s degree holders from different fields of study, including STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields, and BHASE (non-STEM) fields, such as business, humanities, health, arts, social science and education.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016025
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article examines the jobs of young bachelor’s degree holders and identifies how field of study is associated with occupational outcomes. It shows how graduates from a given field of study are distributed across broad occupational groups and how overqualification rates differ by field.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017388
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between occupational skill requirements and educational attainment (the highest level completed and the field of study). Using the 2011 National Household Survey matched to data from the Occupational Information Network (which contains information on occupational skill requirements), the study uncovers many new findings on the skill requirements of jobs held by Canadians aged 25 to 34 with different educational qualifications.

    Release date: 2017-01-24

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014360
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines which factors underlie the narrowing of wage differences seen between young bachelor’s degree holders and high school graduates from the 2000-to-2002 period to the 2010-to-2012 period and the widening of differences in full-time paid employment rates between these two groups.

    Four types of factors are considered: those associated with changes in labour supply, labour demand, institutions and employer–employee contracts, and general economic conditions.

    Changes in the population of bachelor’s degree holders relative to the population of high school graduates are used to capture changes in relative labour supply.

    Release date: 2014-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014359
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the long-term labour market premiums associated with completing a college certificate and a bachelor's degree, compared to completing a high school diploma. Several labour market outcomes of individuals are examined with longitudinal data over a 20-year period spanning their mid-30s to their mid-50s.

    With the creation of a new linked file consisting of the 1991 Census of Population and the Longitudinal Worker File (LWF), it is now possible to follow individuals in the labour market for a longer period of time than is feasible with existing survey data. The purpose of this study is to compare labour market outcomes of individuals with different levels of educational attainment over a 20-year period spanning their mid-30s to their mid-50s. Three levels of education are considered, corresponding to the decisions made by students following high school graduation: a high school diploma, a college certificate, and a bachelor's degree. Longitudinal data are used to track total earnings (wages and salaries plus net self-employment income), coverage in an employer-sponsored pension plan, employment, union membership, and permanent and temporary layoffs over the period 1991 to 2010.

    Release date: 2014-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009072
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This report provides new and unique empirical evidence on postsecondary education pathways in Atlantic Canada based on the data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS). This study covers postsecondary students in public institutions at all levels of study - college, bachelor's, master's, Ph.D. and first professional degrees - with the emphasis on college and bachelor's students. The focus is on students who start new programs over the period of study, years 2001 through to 2004, and then observing who, in each year of their studies, graduates, continues in the same program, switches programs or leaves postsecondary education without graduating. The number of students who leave and then return to postsecondary studies and the number of students who graduate from a program and then continue in their studies are also identified. Students in this study can be tracked longitudinally as they move both within and across all institutions in the Atlantic.

    The research file used for this study was created by Statistics Canada using PSIS data from the Atlantic region. One of the key objectives of the PSIS is to provide information that will enable researchers to perform studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. PSIS is designed to hold a complete inventory of all Canadian postsecondary institutions and the programs and courses they offer, as well as demographic, program and course information for each student registered at these institutions. Atlantic Canada has participated in PSIS since the inception of PSIS and therefore was well positioned to take advantage of a longitudinal study using PSIS.

    The research file includes one longitudinal record for each postsecondary student who studied in Atlantic Canada at some point during the years 2001 through to 2004. The term "longitudinal" means that, as the student progresses through the postsecondary system, the PSIS record will provide a cumulative history of their postsecondary activity. It is the longitudinal nature of the database that allows for statistical studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. The research file contains 337,000 student records.

    Release date: 2009-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007059
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999.

    Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the first four cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2005 when they were 24 to 26 years of age.

    Previous research on postsecondary participation of Canadian youth found that no one factor can fully account for who goes on to postsecondary education. There was, instead, a wide variety of characteristics which distinguish youth who undertake postsecondary education from those who do not. This report will examine demographic and family characteristics, high school engagement, academic performance, and first year postsecondary experience of those who attended postsecondary education and those who did not or dropped out.

    Chapter 2 looks at the relationship between various demographic, family and school characteristics and youth participation in postsecondary education, with respect to the type of institution attended and the level of program taken in university (bachelors versus graduate studies).

    Chapter 3 analyses the relationship between the same characteristics and youth participation status in postsecondary education, that is graduates, continuers or drop outs.

    Chapter 4, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings.

    Release date: 2007-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410376
    Description:

    This article presents some of what we currently know to begin to address some of the crucial questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in the health sector? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this article reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on the interest of youth in health occupations, the characteristics of students and faculty in university health programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs, and the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2007-10-30
Data (27)

Data (27) (0 to 10 of 27 results)

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Table: 95F0418X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0418X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (by 1996 Representation Order).

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0418X2001004
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 95F0418XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0418X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0419X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0419X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (by 1996 Representation order).

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0419X2001004
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 95F0419XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0419X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 97F0017X2001001
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0017XIE2001001.

    Release date: 2003-03-11
Analysis (56)

Analysis (56) (0 to 10 of 56 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154978
    Description:

    More and more Canadians are pursuing graduate studies, often to increase their chances of getting a better-paying job. Using data from the 2016 Census, this study examines the extent to which median earnings of workers with a master’s degree or doctorate differ from their counterparts with a bachelor’s degree, focusing on differences across fields of study. The target population includes paid employees aged 30 to 59 who worked full year and full time during the year preceding the census, and whose highest educational qualification was obtained in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-09-26

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016023
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article compares the earnings of young bachelor’s degree holders from different fields of study, including STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields, and BHASE (non-STEM) fields, such as business, humanities, health, arts, social science and education.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016025
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article examines the jobs of young bachelor’s degree holders and identifies how field of study is associated with occupational outcomes. It shows how graduates from a given field of study are distributed across broad occupational groups and how overqualification rates differ by field.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017388
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between occupational skill requirements and educational attainment (the highest level completed and the field of study). Using the 2011 National Household Survey matched to data from the Occupational Information Network (which contains information on occupational skill requirements), the study uncovers many new findings on the skill requirements of jobs held by Canadians aged 25 to 34 with different educational qualifications.

    Release date: 2017-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014360
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines which factors underlie the narrowing of wage differences seen between young bachelor’s degree holders and high school graduates from the 2000-to-2002 period to the 2010-to-2012 period and the widening of differences in full-time paid employment rates between these two groups.

    Four types of factors are considered: those associated with changes in labour supply, labour demand, institutions and employer–employee contracts, and general economic conditions.

    Changes in the population of bachelor’s degree holders relative to the population of high school graduates are used to capture changes in relative labour supply.

    Release date: 2014-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014359
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the long-term labour market premiums associated with completing a college certificate and a bachelor's degree, compared to completing a high school diploma. Several labour market outcomes of individuals are examined with longitudinal data over a 20-year period spanning their mid-30s to their mid-50s.

    With the creation of a new linked file consisting of the 1991 Census of Population and the Longitudinal Worker File (LWF), it is now possible to follow individuals in the labour market for a longer period of time than is feasible with existing survey data. The purpose of this study is to compare labour market outcomes of individuals with different levels of educational attainment over a 20-year period spanning their mid-30s to their mid-50s. Three levels of education are considered, corresponding to the decisions made by students following high school graduation: a high school diploma, a college certificate, and a bachelor's degree. Longitudinal data are used to track total earnings (wages and salaries plus net self-employment income), coverage in an employer-sponsored pension plan, employment, union membership, and permanent and temporary layoffs over the period 1991 to 2010.

    Release date: 2014-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009072
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This report provides new and unique empirical evidence on postsecondary education pathways in Atlantic Canada based on the data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS). This study covers postsecondary students in public institutions at all levels of study - college, bachelor's, master's, Ph.D. and first professional degrees - with the emphasis on college and bachelor's students. The focus is on students who start new programs over the period of study, years 2001 through to 2004, and then observing who, in each year of their studies, graduates, continues in the same program, switches programs or leaves postsecondary education without graduating. The number of students who leave and then return to postsecondary studies and the number of students who graduate from a program and then continue in their studies are also identified. Students in this study can be tracked longitudinally as they move both within and across all institutions in the Atlantic.

    The research file used for this study was created by Statistics Canada using PSIS data from the Atlantic region. One of the key objectives of the PSIS is to provide information that will enable researchers to perform studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. PSIS is designed to hold a complete inventory of all Canadian postsecondary institutions and the programs and courses they offer, as well as demographic, program and course information for each student registered at these institutions. Atlantic Canada has participated in PSIS since the inception of PSIS and therefore was well positioned to take advantage of a longitudinal study using PSIS.

    The research file includes one longitudinal record for each postsecondary student who studied in Atlantic Canada at some point during the years 2001 through to 2004. The term "longitudinal" means that, as the student progresses through the postsecondary system, the PSIS record will provide a cumulative history of their postsecondary activity. It is the longitudinal nature of the database that allows for statistical studies of student mobility, pathways and their relationship to education and labour market outcomes. The research file contains 337,000 student records.

    Release date: 2009-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007059
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999.

    Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the first four cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2005 when they were 24 to 26 years of age.

    Previous research on postsecondary participation of Canadian youth found that no one factor can fully account for who goes on to postsecondary education. There was, instead, a wide variety of characteristics which distinguish youth who undertake postsecondary education from those who do not. This report will examine demographic and family characteristics, high school engagement, academic performance, and first year postsecondary experience of those who attended postsecondary education and those who did not or dropped out.

    Chapter 2 looks at the relationship between various demographic, family and school characteristics and youth participation in postsecondary education, with respect to the type of institution attended and the level of program taken in university (bachelors versus graduate studies).

    Chapter 3 analyses the relationship between the same characteristics and youth participation status in postsecondary education, that is graduates, continuers or drop outs.

    Chapter 4, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings.

    Release date: 2007-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410376
    Description:

    This article presents some of what we currently know to begin to address some of the crucial questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in the health sector? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this article reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on the interest of youth in health occupations, the characteristics of students and faculty in university health programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs, and the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this publication presents some of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands? As such, the report is primarily comprised of information tables accompanied by some brief analysis intended to highlight broad findings that may guide the reader in interpreting the tables.

    Release date: 2007-08-13
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-133-X
    Description:

    This report describes changes planned for the 2006 Census education questions. Education questions are a part of the Form 2B (the long form) of the census. This form is completed by 20% of all households. These changes were tested in the May 2004 Census test of over 300,000 households. The changes aim to address data limitations in the 2001 Census questions and to enhance their relevance to education studies by allowing a better reflection of the range of educational pathways taken by Canadians. The report includes an explanation of the reasons for modifying the 2006 Census education content, a detailed look at each of the changes, and a discussion on historical consistency.

    Release date: 2005-08-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89M0015G
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is a long-term research program (started in 1994) that will track a large sample of children over many years, enabling researchers to monitor children's well-being and development.

    Not all the information collected for the first cycle of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth are included in this first microdata file. The second release will be in 1997.

    Release date: 1996-12-18
Date modified: