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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 98-26-0008
    Description: This report presents the results of a study on the estimated number of children eligible for instruction in the minority official language, pursuant to section 23 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, who were classified as ineligible in the 2021 Census because relationships between family members living at different addresses could not be established within this data source. Using other data sources, including previous censuses and administrative data (such as vital statistics and tax data), we were able to establish these family relationships within the 2021 Census. This report presents the methods and data sources used first, then the results by selected regions and age groups.
    Release date: 2024-03-26

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016006
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series describes the family situations of children living in a lone-parent family, in a stepfamily or without their biological or adoptive parents. This document also highlights a few differences by the age of the children and by province and territory.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Table: 98-400-X2016024
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration, Census metropolitan area part, Census agglomeration part
    Description:

    This table presents Census Family Structure Including Stepfamily Status and Number and Age Combinations of Children for Census Families with Children in Private Households of Canada, Provinces and Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Table: 98-400-X2016025
    Geography: Province or territory, Census division, Census subdivision
    Description:

    This table presents Census Family Structure Including Stepfamily Status and Number and Age Combinations of Children for Census Families with Children in Private Households of Canada, Provinces and Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Table: 98-400-X2016026
    Geography: Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration, Census tract
    Description:

    This table presents Census Family Structure Including Stepfamily Status and Number and Age Combinations of Children for Census Families with Children in Private Households of Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114547
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Household Survey (NHS) to examine the living arrangements of Aboriginal children aged 14 and under, and includes results about the proportion of Aboriginal children who lived with lone parents, with their grandparents, or in a stepfamily. The study also provides key statistics about Aboriginal foster children.

    Release date: 2016-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114235
    Description:

    The majority of women and girls in Canada live in families although there is much diversity in their particular living arrangements. This chapter of Women in Canada begins with a brief overview of the family context and living arrangements of girls aged 14 and under but focuses primarily on those of women aged 15 and over. Topics to be examined include the conjugal status of women, that is, the extent to which women are in legal marriages or common-law unions, and whether these women in couples are opposite-sex or same-sex or include children in the home. In addition, trends related to women in stepfamilies, divorced or separated women and lone-mother families will be analysed. Other living arrangements of women, such as living alone, with relatives, or only with non-relatives, as well as fertility patterns, will also be explored.

    Release date: 2015-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008014
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This research paper explores youth delinquency using data from the International Youth Survey as self-reported by Toronto youth in 2006. In particular, the study examines how the associations between youth delinquency and age, sex, family composition and generational status are affected by factors related to school, victimization and family and friends. Detailed findings are presented for both property and violent delinquency.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700510501
    Description:

    This article uses the first three cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to ask the question: are there any differences in early labour market outcomes following postsecondary graduation for young adults who took a break of more than four months between finishing high school and starting postsecondary studies compared to those who went straight on to postsecondary education? Results suggest that taking time off between high school graduation and postsecondary studies affects university and college educated young adults differently. Moreover, what matters most is not whether youth had delayed starting a postsecondary program following high school graduation, but rather whether they went to a postsecondary program and saw it through to completion. Meanwhile, pertinent background factors include grade-point average, parental education and sex.

    Release date: 2008-01-07

  • Table: 89-625-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Cycle 20 of the General Social Survey (GSS) conducted from June to October 2006, collected detailed information from 23,608 persons aged 15 and older and living in a private household in one of 10 Canadian provinces. The survey focused on information about the respondent's family. This publication presents data on the number of families by family structure by Regions.

    Release date: 2007-08-23
Data (6)

Data (6) ((6 results))

Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016006
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series describes the family situations of children living in a lone-parent family, in a stepfamily or without their biological or adoptive parents. This document also highlights a few differences by the age of the children and by province and territory.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114547
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Household Survey (NHS) to examine the living arrangements of Aboriginal children aged 14 and under, and includes results about the proportion of Aboriginal children who lived with lone parents, with their grandparents, or in a stepfamily. The study also provides key statistics about Aboriginal foster children.

    Release date: 2016-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114235
    Description:

    The majority of women and girls in Canada live in families although there is much diversity in their particular living arrangements. This chapter of Women in Canada begins with a brief overview of the family context and living arrangements of girls aged 14 and under but focuses primarily on those of women aged 15 and over. Topics to be examined include the conjugal status of women, that is, the extent to which women are in legal marriages or common-law unions, and whether these women in couples are opposite-sex or same-sex or include children in the home. In addition, trends related to women in stepfamilies, divorced or separated women and lone-mother families will be analysed. Other living arrangements of women, such as living alone, with relatives, or only with non-relatives, as well as fertility patterns, will also be explored.

    Release date: 2015-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008014
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This research paper explores youth delinquency using data from the International Youth Survey as self-reported by Toronto youth in 2006. In particular, the study examines how the associations between youth delinquency and age, sex, family composition and generational status are affected by factors related to school, victimization and family and friends. Detailed findings are presented for both property and violent delinquency.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700510501
    Description:

    This article uses the first three cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to ask the question: are there any differences in early labour market outcomes following postsecondary graduation for young adults who took a break of more than four months between finishing high school and starting postsecondary studies compared to those who went straight on to postsecondary education? Results suggest that taking time off between high school graduation and postsecondary studies affects university and college educated young adults differently. Moreover, what matters most is not whether youth had delayed starting a postsecondary program following high school graduation, but rather whether they went to a postsecondary program and saw it through to completion. Meanwhile, pertinent background factors include grade-point average, parental education and sex.

    Release date: 2008-01-07

  • 6. Spousal violence Archived
    Articles and reports: 85-224-X20040006982
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Societal recognition of the problem of domestic violence has led to an overall shift in the criminal justice system's response to violence in spousal relationships, as well as the implementation of prevention and intervention initiatives at the community level over the past number of decades. Furthermore, research conducted by governments and academics has allowed us to gain a better understanding of the nature and extent of violence, the risk factors associated with spousal violence, and the characteristics of victims and offenders.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • 7. Update on families Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016529
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This update outlines the major changes that have occurred within families and to their living arrangements over the last 20 years.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-576-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The increasing popularity of common-law unions is transforming family life in Canada, according to new data from the 2001 General Social Survey. Over the past 30 years, common-law unions have become more and more popular, especially in Quebec and among younger women in other provinces.

    Although younger women are more likely to start their conjugal life by living common law, most will eventually marry. First common-law unions are twice as likely to end in separation as first marriages. What is more, a growing proportion of women have experienced at least two unions, and the likelihood of choosing a common-law relationship over marriage for the second union is also increasing. The analysis shows that the trends observed in the formation and break-up of unions apply equally to men and women. Since men are on average older than women when they start their conjugal life, they tend to experience the events at an older age.

    Release date: 2002-07-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20010006461
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005750
    Geography: Canada
    Description: In the present research, our aims are to trace the emergence of the "blended family" (the term generally employed to describe stepfamilies with a common child), exploring which features of stepfamilies make them most susceptible to become blended families, and to assess how being born into a stepfamily affects the family experience and subsequent life course of the growing number of children involved.
    Release date: 2001-06-22
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 98-26-0008
    Description: This report presents the results of a study on the estimated number of children eligible for instruction in the minority official language, pursuant to section 23 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, who were classified as ineligible in the 2021 Census because relationships between family members living at different addresses could not be established within this data source. Using other data sources, including previous censuses and administrative data (such as vital statistics and tax data), we were able to establish these family relationships within the 2021 Census. This report presents the methods and data sources used first, then the results by selected regions and age groups.
    Release date: 2024-03-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89M0015G
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is a long-term research program (started in 1994) that will track a large sample of children over many years, enabling researchers to monitor children's well-being and development.

    Not all the information collected for the first cycle of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth are included in this first microdata file. The second release will be in 1997.

    Release date: 1996-12-18
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