Employment and unemployment

Key indicators

Changing any selection will automatically update the page content.

Selected geographical area: Nova Scotia

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Nova Scotia

Selected geographical area: New Brunswick

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: New Brunswick

Selected geographical area: Quebec

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Quebec

Selected geographical area: Ontario

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Ontario

Selected geographical area: Manitoba

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Manitoba

Selected geographical area: Saskatchewan

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Saskatchewan

Selected geographical area: Alberta

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Alberta

Selected geographical area: British Columbia

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: British Columbia

Selected geographical area: Yukon

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Yukon

Selected geographical area: Northwest Territories

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Northwest Territories

Selected geographical area: Nunavut

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Nunavut

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (540)

All (540) (0 to 10 of 540 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400004
    Description:

    This study examines whether the gaps in the employment rates and weekly earnings between immigrants and Canadian-born individuals increased or decreased over the last two decades. Earlier studies have well documented the expanding earnings gap between new immigrant workers and their Canadian-born counterparts during the 1980s and 1990s. However, significant policy changes in immigration selection and settlement have been introduced since the early 2000s, and the employment rate and entry earnings among new immigrants have been improving in recent years. Little research has been undertaken to examine whether the earnings gap between new immigrant and Canadian-born workers has recently started to close.

    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100300001
    Description:

    Analysts often use the unemployment and labour force participation rates as key indicators of the dynamism—or lack thereof—of the labour market, while some analysts want to know what percentage of jobs are part-time or temporary, or what percentage of workers are self-employed. One labour market indicator summarizes the influence of these five factors: the percentage of the population holding a paid job that is full-time and permanent.

    Release date: 2021-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200002
    Description:

    This Insights article examines the degree to which workers who lost their job in 2009 started a business, changed regions, went back to school or began a registered apprenticeship in 2010, the year following job loss. The analysis combines the 2001 Census of Population with Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File and Registered Apprenticeship Information System.

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    In recent years, technological advancements in artificial intelligence and machine learning have broadened the realm of tasks that have the potential to be accomplished through automation technology. Consequently, these developments have raised questions about the future of work. Debate on this issue has focused primarily on the risk of job loss attributable to automation, with less attention given to how automation may change the nature of workers’ jobs. This study employs a task-based approach that shifts the focus from job replacement to changes in the nature of Canadians’ work. This approach views occupations as a set of tasks, allowing researchers to assess the effects of automation in the context of changes in occupational tasks.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100005
    Description:

    Around the world, one critical response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been the implementation of physical distancing measures. These policies, which are necessary to contain the spread of the virus, have had serious consequences on the organization of work. This study used the Labour Force Survey (LFS), which makes it possible to compare the estimates of the hours worked in an employee’s main job in 2020 with the 2017-to-2019 average of hours worked (hereafter referred to as the “baseline”). The main contribution of the article is that it provides estimates of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic not only by industry and province but also by firm size, which is an important dimension more rarely discussed.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020018
    Description:

    Although refugee claimants seek asylum in Canada for humanitarian reasons, their labour market outcomes play a crucial role in their successful integration, which is why it is important to monitor the degree of labour market success achieved by refugee claimants. This study compares the long-term labour market outcomes of refugee claimants who eventually became permanent residents in Canada (RC-PRs) with those of government-assisted refugees (GARs) and privately sponsored refugees (PSRs), as well as with refugee claimants who did not become permanent residents in Canada (RC-NPRs).

    Release date: 2020-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020024
    Description:

    Recent improvements in robotics have rekindled ancient fears about the impact of robotics on humankind. Unfortunately, existing data seldom distinguishes robots from other types of automation, so research into their impact so far has been difficult. This article introduces research from a new Statistics Canada dataset, Robots!, on the impact of robots at the firm-level. The article examines the impact of robot investment on firm performance and employment at the enterprise level.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020025
    Description:

    Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, advances in artificial intelligence and robotics raised concerns that automation might lead to relatively high unemployment rates in the coming years. This Economic Insights article examines the degree to which Canadians’ views about the impact of automation on net job creation in 1989 materialized three decades later.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020017
    Description:

    This study examines how employment and organizations have changed in response to robot adoption. As robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) become increasingly used by firms as the next engine of innovation and productivity growth, their effects on labour, firm practices and productivity have become a subject of growing importance. The study provides the most comprehensive evidence possible at the level of individual businesses on the employment and organizational effects of robot investments.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2020002
    Description:

    Among the employed population, women are generally younger than men. Furthermore, there are notable differences for particular occupations, which is even more pronounced for certain groups of women. This study uses data primarily from the 2016 Census of Population to examine the prevalence and age composition of three groups of women-South Asian, Chinese and Black-across occupations of various skill levels.

    Release date: 2020-10-22
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (540)

Analysis (540) (0 to 10 of 540 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400004
    Description:

    This study examines whether the gaps in the employment rates and weekly earnings between immigrants and Canadian-born individuals increased or decreased over the last two decades. Earlier studies have well documented the expanding earnings gap between new immigrant workers and their Canadian-born counterparts during the 1980s and 1990s. However, significant policy changes in immigration selection and settlement have been introduced since the early 2000s, and the employment rate and entry earnings among new immigrants have been improving in recent years. Little research has been undertaken to examine whether the earnings gap between new immigrant and Canadian-born workers has recently started to close.

    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100300001
    Description:

    Analysts often use the unemployment and labour force participation rates as key indicators of the dynamism—or lack thereof—of the labour market, while some analysts want to know what percentage of jobs are part-time or temporary, or what percentage of workers are self-employed. One labour market indicator summarizes the influence of these five factors: the percentage of the population holding a paid job that is full-time and permanent.

    Release date: 2021-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100200002
    Description:

    This Insights article examines the degree to which workers who lost their job in 2009 started a business, changed regions, went back to school or began a registered apprenticeship in 2010, the year following job loss. The analysis combines the 2001 Census of Population with Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File and Registered Apprenticeship Information System.

    Release date: 2021-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    In recent years, technological advancements in artificial intelligence and machine learning have broadened the realm of tasks that have the potential to be accomplished through automation technology. Consequently, these developments have raised questions about the future of work. Debate on this issue has focused primarily on the risk of job loss attributable to automation, with less attention given to how automation may change the nature of workers’ jobs. This study employs a task-based approach that shifts the focus from job replacement to changes in the nature of Canadians’ work. This approach views occupations as a set of tasks, allowing researchers to assess the effects of automation in the context of changes in occupational tasks.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100005
    Description:

    Around the world, one critical response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been the implementation of physical distancing measures. These policies, which are necessary to contain the spread of the virus, have had serious consequences on the organization of work. This study used the Labour Force Survey (LFS), which makes it possible to compare the estimates of the hours worked in an employee’s main job in 2020 with the 2017-to-2019 average of hours worked (hereafter referred to as the “baseline”). The main contribution of the article is that it provides estimates of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic not only by industry and province but also by firm size, which is an important dimension more rarely discussed.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020018
    Description:

    Although refugee claimants seek asylum in Canada for humanitarian reasons, their labour market outcomes play a crucial role in their successful integration, which is why it is important to monitor the degree of labour market success achieved by refugee claimants. This study compares the long-term labour market outcomes of refugee claimants who eventually became permanent residents in Canada (RC-PRs) with those of government-assisted refugees (GARs) and privately sponsored refugees (PSRs), as well as with refugee claimants who did not become permanent residents in Canada (RC-NPRs).

    Release date: 2020-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020024
    Description:

    Recent improvements in robotics have rekindled ancient fears about the impact of robotics on humankind. Unfortunately, existing data seldom distinguishes robots from other types of automation, so research into their impact so far has been difficult. This article introduces research from a new Statistics Canada dataset, Robots!, on the impact of robots at the firm-level. The article examines the impact of robot investment on firm performance and employment at the enterprise level.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020025
    Description:

    Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, advances in artificial intelligence and robotics raised concerns that automation might lead to relatively high unemployment rates in the coming years. This Economic Insights article examines the degree to which Canadians’ views about the impact of automation on net job creation in 1989 materialized three decades later.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020017
    Description:

    This study examines how employment and organizations have changed in response to robot adoption. As robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) become increasingly used by firms as the next engine of innovation and productivity growth, their effects on labour, firm practices and productivity have become a subject of growing importance. The study provides the most comprehensive evidence possible at the level of individual businesses on the employment and organizational effects of robot investments.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2020002
    Description:

    Among the employed population, women are generally younger than men. Furthermore, there are notable differences for particular occupations, which is even more pronounced for certain groups of women. This study uses data primarily from the 2016 Census of Population to examine the prevalence and age composition of three groups of women-South Asian, Chinese and Black-across occupations of various skill levels.

    Release date: 2020-10-22
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024349
    Description:

    Measurement of gross flows in labour force status is an important objective of the continuing labour force surveys carried out by many national statistics agencies. However, it is well known that estimation of these flows can be complicated by nonresponse, measurement errors, sample rotation and complex design effects. Motivated by nonresponse patterns in household-based surveys, this paper focuses on estimation of labour force gross flows, while simultaneously adjusting for nonignorable nonresponse. Previous model-based approaches to gross flows estimation have assumed nonresponse to be an individual-level process. We propose a class of models that allow for nonignorable household-level nonresponse. A simulation study is used to show, that individual-level labour force gross flows estimates from household-based survey data, may be biased and that estimates using household-level models can offer a reduction in this bias.

    Release date: 1999-01-14
Date modified: