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All (69) (0 to 10 of 69 results)

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2018012
    Description:

    This fact sheet explores the education and labour market situation of young Canadians aged 15 to 19. In this paper we find that:

    The proportion of 15 to 19 year old Canadians who are not in employment, education or training (NEET) has fallen over time.

    In general, countries with lower NEET rates for this age group tend to have a higher typical age of high school graduation.

    The 15 to 19 year old group is a heterogeneous one with younger Canadians aged 15 and 16 being much more likely to be in school and older youth in this group starting their first transition to postsecondary education or the labour market.

    There was very little provincial variation in terms of NEET rates that was statistically significant in 2016.

    Release date: 2018-02-22

  • Table: 41-10-0038-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 578-0003)
    Geography: Canada
    Description: Path to obtaining high school diploma and postsecondary education, by Aboriginal identity, age group and sex, population aged 15 years and over, Canada, provinces and territories (occasional).
    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Table: 41-10-0039-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 578-0004)
    Geography: Canada
    Description: Path to obtaining high school diploma and postsecondary education, by age group and sex, Inuit population aged 15 years and over, Canada and Inuit Nunangat (occasional).
    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014717
    Description:

    Files with linked data from the Statistics Canada, Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) and tax data can be used to examine the trajectories of students who pursue postsecondary education (PSE) programs and their post-schooling labour market outcomes. On one hand, administrative data on students linked longitudinally can provide aggregate information on student pathways during postsecondary studies such as persistence rates, graduation rates, mobility, etc. On the other hand, the tax data could supplement the PSIS data to provide information on employment outcomes such as average and median earnings or earnings progress by employment sector (industry), field of study, education level and/or other demographic information, year over year after graduation. Two longitudinal pilot studies have been done using administrative data on postsecondary students of Maritimes institutions which have been longitudinally linked and linked to Statistics Canada Ttx data (the T1 Family File) for relevant years. This article first focuses on the quality of information in the administrative data and the methodology used to conduct these longitudinal studies and derive indicators. Second, it will focus on some limitations when using administrative data, rather than a survey, to define some concepts.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015044
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines academic outcomes of public and private high school students and the factors associated with the differences across sectors. A longer, more detailed study is also available. The article is part of a series examining the academic outcomes of youth.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015367
    Description:

    This study examines the roles played by student characteristics, school resources and teaching practices, peer group effects, and province fixed effects in accounting for differences in the academic outcomes of private and public high school students.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2015010
    Description:

    This paper examines the career expectations of Canadian youth over time, using a longitudinal database, to assess when youth begin to demonstrate consistency in their career choices. In this research, youth are said to demonstrate consistency in their career choices when their response to the question "What kind of job or occupation would you be interested in having when you are about 30 years old?" matches with their answers from earlier cycles of the survey in terms of occupation type and required level of education.

    This paper first examines factors contributing to earlier and later consistency in career expectations, followed by a comparison of educational outcomes based on career consistency patterns. The goal of this analysis is to identify differences in educational outcomes based on the career decision making patterns demonstrated by youth.

    This article uses data from the Statistics Canada's Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) collected between the years 2000 and 2010, and focuses on cohort A. The YITS cohort A members were 15 years old in 2000, and were surveyed every 2 years until the age of 25.

    Release date: 2015-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2014101
    Description:

    Using data from the 2013 National Graduates Survey (Class of 2009-2010), this report describes the educational experiences, labour market outcomes and financing of higher education of recent Canadian postsecondary graduates. Section one describes the profile and educational pathways of graduates from college, bachelor, master and doctorate level programs. Section two focuses on labour market activity three years after graduation. Section three presents information on the sources of financing of postsecondary education as well as debt repayment and its relation to education level and field of study. Section four focuses specifically on co-op education programs. The final section provides a summary and conclusion.

    Release date: 2014-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014354
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the long-term labour market premiums associated with a high school diploma. The focus is on the value of the qualification (the signaling effect), but the premiums associated with the number of years of schooling required to obtain the qualification (the human-capital effect) are also estimated. The labour market outcomes of individuals born in the mid-1960s are measured from their mid-20s to their mid-40s with longitudinal administrative data from the Longitudinal Worker File (LWF) that are linked to the 1991 Census of Population. Two groups are considered: terminal high school graduates (those who had obtained a high school diploma but had not acquired any postsecondary education by the 1991 Census) and individuals without a high school diploma (those who had no high school diploma, were not enrolled in high school, and had no postsecondary education at the time of the 1991 Census).

    Release date: 2014-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2013100
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Past research has revealed that young women are more likely to enter postsecondary programs that have lower returns in the labour market, such as the arts, humanities and social sciences. Young men, conversely, tend to enrol in and graduate from programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), which generally have greater labour market returns. Factors such as academic interests, achievement test scores, and high-school marks can affect later university program choice. Using the linked Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) - Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) data, the current paper examines the relationship between mathematics and science test scores at age 15 and first program choice in university, with a focus on differences in ability in mathematics and science by gender. Generally speaking, the results reveal that the intersection of gender and ability does matter; even young women of high mathematical ability are less likely to enter STEM fields than young men of similar or even lesser mathematical ability. This implies that something other than pure ability is affecting young women's likelihood of entering STEM programs in university.

    Release date: 2013-12-18
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 41-10-0038-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 578-0003)
    Geography: Canada
    Description: Path to obtaining high school diploma and postsecondary education, by Aboriginal identity, age group and sex, population aged 15 years and over, Canada, provinces and territories (occasional).
    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Table: 41-10-0039-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 578-0004)
    Geography: Canada
    Description: Path to obtaining high school diploma and postsecondary education, by age group and sex, Inuit population aged 15 years and over, Canada and Inuit Nunangat (occasional).
    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Table: 81-595-M2005032
    Description:

    This report presents information about doctoral degree recipients who graduated from Canadian universities between July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2004 as collected by the Survey of Earned Doctorates. The analysis focuses on the demographic and educational characteristics of doctoral graduates, how they financed their education, as well as their plans for further study, employment and where they intend to live in the period immediately following graduation.

    Release date: 2005-07-05
Analysis (62)

Analysis (62) (0 to 10 of 62 results)

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2018012
    Description:

    This fact sheet explores the education and labour market situation of young Canadians aged 15 to 19. In this paper we find that:

    The proportion of 15 to 19 year old Canadians who are not in employment, education or training (NEET) has fallen over time.

    In general, countries with lower NEET rates for this age group tend to have a higher typical age of high school graduation.

    The 15 to 19 year old group is a heterogeneous one with younger Canadians aged 15 and 16 being much more likely to be in school and older youth in this group starting their first transition to postsecondary education or the labour market.

    There was very little provincial variation in terms of NEET rates that was statistically significant in 2016.

    Release date: 2018-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015044
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines academic outcomes of public and private high school students and the factors associated with the differences across sectors. A longer, more detailed study is also available. The article is part of a series examining the academic outcomes of youth.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015367
    Description:

    This study examines the roles played by student characteristics, school resources and teaching practices, peer group effects, and province fixed effects in accounting for differences in the academic outcomes of private and public high school students.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2015010
    Description:

    This paper examines the career expectations of Canadian youth over time, using a longitudinal database, to assess when youth begin to demonstrate consistency in their career choices. In this research, youth are said to demonstrate consistency in their career choices when their response to the question "What kind of job or occupation would you be interested in having when you are about 30 years old?" matches with their answers from earlier cycles of the survey in terms of occupation type and required level of education.

    This paper first examines factors contributing to earlier and later consistency in career expectations, followed by a comparison of educational outcomes based on career consistency patterns. The goal of this analysis is to identify differences in educational outcomes based on the career decision making patterns demonstrated by youth.

    This article uses data from the Statistics Canada's Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) collected between the years 2000 and 2010, and focuses on cohort A. The YITS cohort A members were 15 years old in 2000, and were surveyed every 2 years until the age of 25.

    Release date: 2015-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2014101
    Description:

    Using data from the 2013 National Graduates Survey (Class of 2009-2010), this report describes the educational experiences, labour market outcomes and financing of higher education of recent Canadian postsecondary graduates. Section one describes the profile and educational pathways of graduates from college, bachelor, master and doctorate level programs. Section two focuses on labour market activity three years after graduation. Section three presents information on the sources of financing of postsecondary education as well as debt repayment and its relation to education level and field of study. Section four focuses specifically on co-op education programs. The final section provides a summary and conclusion.

    Release date: 2014-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014354
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the long-term labour market premiums associated with a high school diploma. The focus is on the value of the qualification (the signaling effect), but the premiums associated with the number of years of schooling required to obtain the qualification (the human-capital effect) are also estimated. The labour market outcomes of individuals born in the mid-1960s are measured from their mid-20s to their mid-40s with longitudinal administrative data from the Longitudinal Worker File (LWF) that are linked to the 1991 Census of Population. Two groups are considered: terminal high school graduates (those who had obtained a high school diploma but had not acquired any postsecondary education by the 1991 Census) and individuals without a high school diploma (those who had no high school diploma, were not enrolled in high school, and had no postsecondary education at the time of the 1991 Census).

    Release date: 2014-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2013100
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Past research has revealed that young women are more likely to enter postsecondary programs that have lower returns in the labour market, such as the arts, humanities and social sciences. Young men, conversely, tend to enrol in and graduate from programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), which generally have greater labour market returns. Factors such as academic interests, achievement test scores, and high-school marks can affect later university program choice. Using the linked Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) - Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) data, the current paper examines the relationship between mathematics and science test scores at age 15 and first program choice in university, with a focus on differences in ability in mathematics and science by gender. Generally speaking, the results reveal that the intersection of gender and ability does matter; even young women of high mathematical ability are less likely to enter STEM fields than young men of similar or even lesser mathematical ability. This implies that something other than pure ability is affecting young women's likelihood of entering STEM programs in university.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012344
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines differences in postsecondary-participation rates between students with and without immigrant backgrounds in Switzerland and Canada. For both countries, a rich set of longitudinal data, including family background, family aspirations regarding postsecondary education, and students' secondary-school performance as measured by Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) scores, are used to explain these differences. Two groups are analyzed: all 15-year-old students; and all low-performing 15-year-old secondary-school students.

    Release date: 2012-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411594
    Description:

    A typical and direct path to postsecondary education involves high school graduates completing high school in May or June of any given year and then entering postsecondary education in September, resulting in a typical gap of about three months or less. However, not all young people follow this direct path, choosing instead to delay the start of postsecondary studies. This article summarizes the main findings of a recent research report that measured median delay times between high school graduation and starting a first postsecondary program and identified the factors associated with either speeding up or slowing down this transition.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211490
    Description:

    Previous analysis based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) has shown that reading proficiency, as measured in the Programme for the International Student Assessment (PISA) at age 15, is strongly associated with both high school graduation and postsecondary participation. This article uses the most recent data from YITS, collected when youth were age 25, to examine educational, labour market, income and family formation outcomes associated with reading proficiency levels on PISA at age 15. The intent of the analysis is to identify any life-path differences that were associated with reading proficiency levels at age 15. The analysis is descriptive and exploratory in nature. Further analysis is needed to identify causal relationships in the data.

    Release date: 2011-06-27
Reference (4)

Reference (4) ((4 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014717
    Description:

    Files with linked data from the Statistics Canada, Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) and tax data can be used to examine the trajectories of students who pursue postsecondary education (PSE) programs and their post-schooling labour market outcomes. On one hand, administrative data on students linked longitudinally can provide aggregate information on student pathways during postsecondary studies such as persistence rates, graduation rates, mobility, etc. On the other hand, the tax data could supplement the PSIS data to provide information on employment outcomes such as average and median earnings or earnings progress by employment sector (industry), field of study, education level and/or other demographic information, year over year after graduation. Two longitudinal pilot studies have been done using administrative data on postsecondary students of Maritimes institutions which have been longitudinally linked and linked to Statistics Canada Ttx data (the T1 Family File) for relevant years. This article first focuses on the quality of information in the administrative data and the methodology used to conduct these longitudinal studies and derive indicators. Second, it will focus on some limitations when using administrative data, rather than a survey, to define some concepts.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-588-X
    Description:

    The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions and support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

    Objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions are also included family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences.

    The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

    Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 will include information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design will permit analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

    The sample design for the cohort aged 18-20 is similar to that of the Labour-Force survey. The method of data collection is computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The pilot survey was conducted in January 1999. In January-February 2000, 23, 000 youth participated in the main survey data collection.

    Data from both cohorts is expected to be available in 2001. Following release of the first international report by the OECD/PISA project and the first national report, data will be publically available, permitting detailed exploration of content themes.

    Release date: 2001-04-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3156
    Description: The two primary objectives of the School Leavers Survey were 1. To develop comparative profiles of three groups of secondary school attendees a) those who successfully completed secondary school (graduates), b) those still attending (continuers), c) those who left school before receiving a diploma or certificate (leavers); and 2. To establish rates of leaving school before graduation, in Canada and the Provinces.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5066
    Description: The overall objective of the Future to Discover Project is to try to understand whether better information about career choices and/or a promise of financial incentives can encourage students who might not normally decide to pursue post-secondary education (PSE), to complete high school and go on to PSE.
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