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  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2020003
    Description:

    This interactive dashboard allows the user to visualize the factors of population growth and how they have changed over time for census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. The dashboard shows population, population growth, factors of population growth (natural increase, international migration, interprovincial migration, intraprovincial migration), and the proportion of the population by age group. The user can view the data by selecting a census metropolitan area or a census agglomeration of interest as well as a year of interest.

    Release date: 2020-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020004
    Description:

    Unlike economic and family class immigrants, who mostly make their own choice about where to settle in Canada, the initial geographic location of refugees is strongly influenced by government resettlement programs. Government-assisted refugees (GARs) are assigned to one of many designated communities based on a pre-approved regional quota of refugee allocation and the match between a refugee’s needs and community resources. Privately sponsored refugees (PSRs) are received by their sponsors, who are scattered across the country. While previous research suggests that refugees, especially GARs, are more likely to undertake secondary migration than other immigrants, no large-scale quantitative study has compared the rates of departure from initial destination cities for different immigrant categories in the long term. This study compares long-term secondary migration in Canada by immigrant admission category, with a focus on the size of the initial city of settlement.

    Release date: 2020-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018411
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Immigrants tend to reside disproportionately in larger Canadian cities, which may challenge their absorptive capacity. This study uses the linked Longitudinal Immigration Database and T1 Family File to examine the initial location and onward migration decisions of immigrants who are economic principal applicants (EPAs) and who have landed since the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act was passed. The main objective of the study is to identify the factors associated with initially residing and remaining in Canada’s three largest gateway cities: Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver (referred to as MTV).

    Release date: 2018-12-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-209-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada analyses recent demographic patterns at the national, provincial and subprovincial levels. Trends in population growth and the evolution of the various components of Canada's population growth - fertility, mortality and migration (interprovincial and international) - as well as marital status, are examined. The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada has been published annually or biennially since 1985. Beginning in 2011, the Report is available as a dynamic, internet-only publication in order to provide the most recent data and analyses on Canadian demographics as soon as they are available.

    Release date: 2018-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201800154958
    Description:

    This article analyzes the most recent internal migration trends in Canada for the period 2015/2016 (July 1 to June 30). A short section also gives an overview of preliminary data for 2016/2017.

    Release date: 2018-06-05

  • Table: 98-400-X2016316
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This table presents components of migration (In- and Out-): mobility 1 year Ago, mother tongue, age and sex for migrants aged 1 year and over in private households of provinces and territories.

    Release date: 2018-03-28

  • Table: 98-400-X2016317
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This table presents components of migration (In- and Out-): mobility 5 years ago, mother tongue, age and sex for migrants aged 5 years and over in private households of provinces and territories.

    Release date: 2018-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201600114650
    Description:

    This article analyzes the most recent internal migration trends in Canada for the periods 2012/2013, 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 (July 1 to June 30). A short section also gives an overview of preliminary data for 2015/2016.

    Release date: 2016-10-14

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201400114012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines patterns of interprovincial migration in Canada, including overall net migration for each province and territory as well as migratory flows between provinces and territories.

    Data on interprovincial migration analyzed in this article for the period 2011/2012, as well as historical data from 1976/1977 are based on administrative files, specifically, income tax files, which are considered final.

    Release date: 2014-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201300111787
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This article examines patterns of interprovincial migration in Canada, including overall net migration for each province and territory as well as migratory flows between provinces and territories. Data on interprovincial migration analyzed in this article for the years 2009/2010 and 2010/2011, as well as historical data from 1976/1977 are based on administrative files, specifically, income tax files, which are considered final.

    Release date: 2013-07-09
Data (17)

Data (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020004
    Description:

    Unlike economic and family class immigrants, who mostly make their own choice about where to settle in Canada, the initial geographic location of refugees is strongly influenced by government resettlement programs. Government-assisted refugees (GARs) are assigned to one of many designated communities based on a pre-approved regional quota of refugee allocation and the match between a refugee’s needs and community resources. Privately sponsored refugees (PSRs) are received by their sponsors, who are scattered across the country. While previous research suggests that refugees, especially GARs, are more likely to undertake secondary migration than other immigrants, no large-scale quantitative study has compared the rates of departure from initial destination cities for different immigrant categories in the long term. This study compares long-term secondary migration in Canada by immigrant admission category, with a focus on the size of the initial city of settlement.

    Release date: 2020-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018411
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Immigrants tend to reside disproportionately in larger Canadian cities, which may challenge their absorptive capacity. This study uses the linked Longitudinal Immigration Database and T1 Family File to examine the initial location and onward migration decisions of immigrants who are economic principal applicants (EPAs) and who have landed since the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act was passed. The main objective of the study is to identify the factors associated with initially residing and remaining in Canada’s three largest gateway cities: Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver (referred to as MTV).

    Release date: 2018-12-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-209-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada analyses recent demographic patterns at the national, provincial and subprovincial levels. Trends in population growth and the evolution of the various components of Canada's population growth - fertility, mortality and migration (interprovincial and international) - as well as marital status, are examined. The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada has been published annually or biennially since 1985. Beginning in 2011, the Report is available as a dynamic, internet-only publication in order to provide the most recent data and analyses on Canadian demographics as soon as they are available.

    Release date: 2018-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201800154958
    Description:

    This article analyzes the most recent internal migration trends in Canada for the period 2015/2016 (July 1 to June 30). A short section also gives an overview of preliminary data for 2016/2017.

    Release date: 2018-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201600114650
    Description:

    This article analyzes the most recent internal migration trends in Canada for the periods 2012/2013, 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 (July 1 to June 30). A short section also gives an overview of preliminary data for 2015/2016.

    Release date: 2016-10-14

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201400114012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines patterns of interprovincial migration in Canada, including overall net migration for each province and territory as well as migratory flows between provinces and territories.

    Data on interprovincial migration analyzed in this article for the period 2011/2012, as well as historical data from 1976/1977 are based on administrative files, specifically, income tax files, which are considered final.

    Release date: 2014-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201300111787
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This article examines patterns of interprovincial migration in Canada, including overall net migration for each province and territory as well as migratory flows between provinces and territories. Data on interprovincial migration analyzed in this article for the years 2009/2010 and 2010/2011, as well as historical data from 1976/1977 are based on administrative files, specifically, income tax files, which are considered final.

    Release date: 2013-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008318
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The recent economic boom in the Canadian province of Alberta provides an ideal "natural experiment" to examine immigrants' responses to a strong labour demand outside major metropolitan centres. The key finding of our study, which is based on a unique dataset that combines administrative and immigrant records, is that not only did immigrants respond to the recent economic boom in Alberta, but they responded generally more strongly than non-immigrants. We find, however, a great deal of heterogeneity in the magnitude of the response across different regions and for different categories of immigrants.

    Release date: 2008-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X200400010665
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this article, the authors analyze the migration flows of Canadians between 2001 and 2006 using the 2006 Census data. First, the major internal migration movements are described at various geographic levels. The results can show certain phenomena that have marked the 2001-2006 intercensal period, such as the overall decline in mobility, the attraction exercised by Alberta, the urban expansion and the outflow of young people from rural areas. Second, various migrant characteristics are examined using a multivariate statistical model including several types of destination. The results help better understand the socio-demographic characteristics associated with mobility status, such as age, marital status, education, family structure or immigrant status.

    Release date: 2008-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2007008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    If low fertility, aging, demographic growth and ethnocultural diversity are phenomena that accurately describe Canada overall, the same patterns may not necessarily hold true for urban and rural areas. The rhythm and sources of demographic growth have often been significantly different from one area to the next, which would suggest that the situation across Canada stems from the aggregation of different demographies, which are variable between types of regions.

    The objective of this study is to examine demographic differences between urban and rural areas in Canada by analyzing communities along a gradient ranging from the largest metropolitan regions to the most rural areas. Applying a geographic structure to Census data from 1971 to 2001 that maintains constant borders over time, the authors analyze population growth across eight types of urban and rural regions; as well as the contribution of immigration, fertility and internal migration to growth differentials; and the consequences of these observed demographic differences in terms of aging and ethnocultural diversity.

    The study finds that growth is concentrated in the most metropolitan areas in the country and in the rural areas on which they have a strong influence, and diminished as the degree of rurality increases. Internal migration between the different types of areas has largely contributed to this differential growth: the most urbanized areas-with the exception of Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver-underwent significant migratory gains as well as strong growth. This was also the case with the rural regions that had a strong metropolitan influence. The most rural regions experienced a weak demographic growth, in some cases a decline, despite having higher fertility than other regions. The strong growth in the three largest urban areas in Canada-Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver-is largely attributed to the high numbers of international immigrants who decided to settle there. The concentration of newcomers in these regions helped increase the gap between these three areas and the rest of the country in terms of ethnocultural diversity.

    Release date: 2007-04-26
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