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  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100032
    Description:

    To provide insights into how COVID-19 could potentially impact postsecondary institutions, this article provides estimates of the share of enrolments that were international by academic program and source country prior to COVID-19 based on the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS).

    Release date: 2020-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020003
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article discusses the share of postsecondary enrolments that are international by program of study and source country. Given the ongoing uncertainties around the COVID-19 pandemic, including the new public health restrictions imposed on international travel and physical distancing guidelines affecting classroom structures, the share of enrolments in various academic programs that are international is of high relevance at the moment.

    Release date: 2020-06-15

  • Public use microdata: 66M0001X
    Description:

    Records relate to the activities of Canadians travelling outside the country and visitors to Canada: Canadian residents; travellers; non-residents; expenditures; length of stay; type of transportation; purpose of trip; accommodation used; places visited; expenditure by categories.

    International travel data are collected in two flows: Canadian returning from abroad; visitors from the USA and from other countries to Canada.

    Release date: 2019-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016383
    Description:

    This study assesses immigrants’ acculturation profiles as measured by their sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It first examines the relative distribution of immigrants who have a strong sense of belonging to both Canada and their source country; a strong sense of belonging to Canada only; a strong sense of belonging to their source country only; and a weak sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It further examines four sets of determinants of these acculturation profiles, including source-country socioeconomic and cultural characteristics, immigration entry status, post-migration experience, and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2016-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201600114615
    Description:

    This chapter of the Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada shows recent trends related to international immigration in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-05

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2016006
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at immigration to Canada since Canada's Confederation.

    Release date: 2016-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016377
    Description:

    It has been well documented that the children of immigrants in Canada outperform their peers with Canadian-born parents in educational attainment, and that the two groups have similar labour market outcomes. However, large variations by ethnicity or source country exist among the children of immigrants. This study examines the extent to which admission class (e.g., skilled workers, business immigrants, live-in caregivers, the family class and refugees) also matters in the socioeconomic outcomes of childhood immigrants who arrived in Canada before the age of 18.

    Release date: 2016-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016055
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents differences in labour market participation observed between immigrant wives and Canadian-born wives over the 2006-to-2014 period. It also assesses the degree to which the lower participation of immigrant wives, as compared with their Canadian-born counterparts, can be accounted for by differences in socioeconomic characteristics, such as family size, weekly wages of husbands, and labour force participation in the source country. The study uses the Labour Force Survey and World Bank indicators on source-country characteristics to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to Canadian-born women and landed immigrant women aged 25 to 54 who are married (or living in common-law relationships) with husbands aged 25 to 54 who are employed as paid workers. For simplicity, the terms ‘husbands’ and ‘wives’ are used to refer to men and women who are married or in common-law relationships.

    Release date: 2016-01-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114299
    Description:

    This article provides information about the number and characteristics of international students in Canada, and about their rate of transition into permanent residence. The article also examines the extent to which the transition rate varied across characteristics and cohorts, and whether these variations affected the profile of immigrants who are former international students. It does so by using a new administrative database—the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD).

    Release date: 2015-12-10
Data (13)

Data (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Public use microdata: 66M0001X
    Description:

    Records relate to the activities of Canadians travelling outside the country and visitors to Canada: Canadian residents; travellers; non-residents; expenditures; length of stay; type of transportation; purpose of trip; accommodation used; places visited; expenditure by categories.

    International travel data are collected in two flows: Canadian returning from abroad; visitors from the USA and from other countries to Canada.

    Release date: 2019-12-24

  • Table: 63-007-X
    Description:

    This publication presents sales data (in dollars and units) of new vehicles by type (commercial vehicles, buses and coaches, and passenger cars), by origin of manufacture (North America, Canada, United States and Mexico, and Japan and other) and by province of sale. Average price of vehicles sold and market share data are available by the same breakdowns. Seasonally adjusted estimates are available at the national level for sales (in units and in dollars) by type of vehicle. Seasonally adjusted passenger car sales are also available by origin (North America and overseas). Total annual sales estimates, based on the raw monthly data, are also available. These data are available by the same breakdowns as are available for the unadjusted monthly series.

    Release date: 2012-04-18

  • Table: 11-210-X
    Description:

    This companion volume contains historical annual series that correspond to those published in the monthly tables. It includes Canada-wide data on the national accounts, prices, international and domestic trade, labour and financial markets, as well as provincial data on employment earnings, retail trade, housing and consumer price indexes.

    Release date: 2011-07-14

  • Table: 97-556-X2006016
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Mobility and migration', which presents data on the geographic mobility of Canadians; that is, on place of residence one year and five years prior to the census. These data include changes in place of residence for persons who moved within Canada and place of origin for persons who moved to Canada from another country at a given point in time.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-556-XWE2006016.

    Release date: 2008-07-23

  • Table: 97-556-X2006017
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Mobility and migration', which presents data on the geographic mobility of Canadians; that is, on place of residence one year and five years prior to the census. These data include changes in place of residence for persons who moved within Canada and place of origin for persons who moved to Canada from another country at a given point in time.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-556-XWE2006017.

    Release date: 2008-07-23

  • Table: 97-557-X2006022
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Immigration and citizenship', which presents data on immigration trends in Canada. Information is provided on Canada's immigrant or foreign-born population: its size, its geographic distribution, its origins and its demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for the Canadian-born population and non-permanent residents. Citizenship information from the census shows, for example, the number of immigrants who have acquired Canadian citizenship, and the number of Canadians who hold dual citizenship.

    This table can be found in topic bundle: Immigration and citizenship, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-557-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-557-XWE2006022.

    Release date: 2007-12-04

  • Table: 97F0008X2001009
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canadians on the Move," which shows 2001 Census data on the geographic mobility of Canadians, that is, on place of residence one year and five years prior to the census. These data include changes in place of residence for persons who moved within Canada and place of origin for persons who moved to Canada from another country at a given point in time. From these data, it is possible to obtain information on persons who migrated from one province to another or from one census metropolitan area to another, and to paint a picture of some of their characteristics.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0008XIE2001009.

    Release date: 2003-03-26

  • Table: 97F0008X2001010
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canadians on the Move," which shows 2001 Census data on the geographic mobility of Canadians, that is, on place of residence one year and five years prior to the census. These data include changes in place of residence for persons who moved within Canada and place of origin for persons who moved to Canada from another country at a given point in time. From these data, it is possible to obtain information on persons who migrated from one province to another or from one census metropolitan area to another, and to paint a picture of some of their characteristics.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0008XIE2001010.

    Release date: 2003-03-26

  • Table: 23-603-X
    Description:

    This publication contains data from 1976 to date for major livestock series: cattle and calves, hogs, sheep and lambs, wool, furs, trade and prices, stocks of frozen meats, and apparent per capita meat consumption. Data highlights are also included. New and revised estimates for these data are released four times a year.

    Release date: 2003-03-05

  • Table: 96F0030X2001008
    Description:

    This analytic document presents new information from the 2001 Census on the ethnocultural portrait of Canada. The analysis is divided into three themes: historical and recent immigration trends; growth and composition of the visible minority population; and ethnic origins of the population. The immigration theme also focusses on the characteristics and settlement patterns of immigrants who came to Canada in the past 10 years, that is, the 1990 immigrants. These three themes are examined at the national and provincial/territorial geographical levels and for census metropolitan areas.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-01-21
Analysis (48)

Analysis (48) (20 to 30 of 48 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Remittances "the money immigrants send to family members in their country of origin" are now centre stage in development and immigrant research. Yet, in spite of this interest, research on the characteristics of remittance senders in Canada remains quite limited, in large part because of the absence of household survey data. More broadly, studies of remittance senders in Canada and elsewhere often focus on immigrants from only one or two source countries and, consequently, do not provide a broad cross-national perspective on the issue. This study addresses these gaps by using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada to document the incidence of remitting and the amounts remitted by immigrants from a wide range of countries. Using a common set of concepts and methods, we find that the incidence of remitting by the 2000 to 2001 landing cohort ranges from less than 10% to 60% across immigrants from different countries, while the average annual amounts remitted range from about $500 to almost $3,000. Turning to the factors associated with remitting, the financial and family characteristics are consistently significant among immigrants from all world regions. In contrast, other factors, such as gender and education, are associated with remitting among immigrants from some regions but not from others.

    Release date: 2008-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2008003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    The first two reports analyzed the 2006 labour market experiences of immigrants. This third report updates many of these characteristics for 2007, including analysis by province, sex, educational attainment and selected age groups, using 2007 Labour Force Survey data now available.

    Release date: 2008-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The study is the second in a series of analytical articles on immigrants in the labour force based on data from the Labour Force Survey. It sheds light on the relationship between the region or country of birth for immigrants to Canada, when they landed in Canada, and their labour market outcomes (i.e., unemployment, employment and participation rates) in 2006.

    This second report builds on the findings from the original report. It addresses how well immigrants from specific regions or countries of birth fared in the Canadian labour market in 2006.

    Release date: 2008-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810113201
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Where immigrants choose to settle appears to have an impact on their economic integration. It is much faster outside the large urban centres. In the larger urban centres, immigrants face a large initial income disadvantage and subsequent increases are not enough for them to achieve parity with other Canadians. Better economic integration of immigrants outside the larger urban centres is found even after taking into consideration differences in education, ability in an official language, admission class and country of origin.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006273
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent immigration appears to be characterized by frequent return and onward migration. This has important consequences for the contribution of immigrants to the economy of the host country. The return to host country settlement costs may be very low for some immigrants. Lack of longitudinal data has prevented much analysis of whether recent international migration is more like internal migration and not a once-for-all move with a possible return should the move prove to have been a mistake. A newly available longitudinal data set covering all immigrants to Canada since 1980 provides the opportunity to address the issues raised by the new migration. The results show that a large fraction of immigrants, especially among skilled workers and entrepreneurs, are highly internationally mobile.

    Release date: 2006-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20040018734
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey generated methodological challenges like choosing the sampling plan, developing the questionnaire, collecting the data, weighting the data and estimating the variance.

    Release date: 2005-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-13
Reference (1)

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