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  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20040018734
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey generated methodological challenges like choosing the sampling plan, developing the questionnaire, collecting the data, weighting the data and estimating the variance.

    Release date: 2005-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005254
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines changes in the geographic concentration of Canada's major immigrant groups, with respect to their initial destination and subsequent redistribution during the past two decades. At the same time, it examines the role of pre-existing immigrant communities in determining immigrants' locational choices. The results show a large rise in concentration levels at the initial destination among major immigrant groups throughout the 1970s and 1980s; this subsided in the following decade. Redistribution after immigration was generally small-scale, and had inconsistent effects on changing concentration at initial destinations among immigrant groups and across arrival cohorts within an immigrant group. Even for immigrant and refugee groups whose initial settlement was strongly influenced by government intervention, redistribution only partly altered general geographic distribution. Finally, this study finds that the size of the pre-existing immigrant community is not a significant factor in immigrant locational choice when location fixed effects are accounted for.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005241
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of ethnic neighbourhoods on wage growth as well as other labour market outcomes of immigrant men in Canada using the 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1996 Censuses. While the primary measure of affiliation is country of birth, ethnicity, language and visible minority status are also examined to determine the robustness of the findings. Consistent with U.S. findings, ethnic neighbourhoods based on country of birth are found to have a negative impact on the ten-year wage growth of immigrants. Further, the model for wage growth is found to be robust to different lengths of time and different base years as well as the specification of language and ethnicity as the affiliation grouping. Using country of birth as the affiliation index, exposure is also found to have a negative impact on the growth of total and weekly earnings as well as the initial wages of entry cohorts. While little evidence is found on the effects of ethnic neighbourhoods on changes in employment, a negative effect of exposure is found on entry employment rates of the most recent landing cohorts. Although the overall effect of ethnic neighbourhoods on wage growth is negative, ethnic neighbourhoods are found to have a divergent effect on different landing cohorts, having a positive impact on the wage growth of the more recent cohorts and a negative impact on earlier cohorts.

    Release date: 2005-02-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 87-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Travel-log is a quarterly tourism newsletter that examines international travel trends, international travel accounts and the travel price index. It also features the latest tourism indicators and includes feature articles related to tourism.

    Release date: 2005-01-26
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  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20040018734
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey generated methodological challenges like choosing the sampling plan, developing the questionnaire, collecting the data, weighting the data and estimating the variance.

    Release date: 2005-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005254
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines changes in the geographic concentration of Canada's major immigrant groups, with respect to their initial destination and subsequent redistribution during the past two decades. At the same time, it examines the role of pre-existing immigrant communities in determining immigrants' locational choices. The results show a large rise in concentration levels at the initial destination among major immigrant groups throughout the 1970s and 1980s; this subsided in the following decade. Redistribution after immigration was generally small-scale, and had inconsistent effects on changing concentration at initial destinations among immigrant groups and across arrival cohorts within an immigrant group. Even for immigrant and refugee groups whose initial settlement was strongly influenced by government intervention, redistribution only partly altered general geographic distribution. Finally, this study finds that the size of the pre-existing immigrant community is not a significant factor in immigrant locational choice when location fixed effects are accounted for.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005241
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of ethnic neighbourhoods on wage growth as well as other labour market outcomes of immigrant men in Canada using the 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1996 Censuses. While the primary measure of affiliation is country of birth, ethnicity, language and visible minority status are also examined to determine the robustness of the findings. Consistent with U.S. findings, ethnic neighbourhoods based on country of birth are found to have a negative impact on the ten-year wage growth of immigrants. Further, the model for wage growth is found to be robust to different lengths of time and different base years as well as the specification of language and ethnicity as the affiliation grouping. Using country of birth as the affiliation index, exposure is also found to have a negative impact on the growth of total and weekly earnings as well as the initial wages of entry cohorts. While little evidence is found on the effects of ethnic neighbourhoods on changes in employment, a negative effect of exposure is found on entry employment rates of the most recent landing cohorts. Although the overall effect of ethnic neighbourhoods on wage growth is negative, ethnic neighbourhoods are found to have a divergent effect on different landing cohorts, having a positive impact on the wage growth of the more recent cohorts and a negative impact on earlier cohorts.

    Release date: 2005-02-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 87-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Travel-log is a quarterly tourism newsletter that examines international travel trends, international travel accounts and the travel price index. It also features the latest tourism indicators and includes feature articles related to tourism.

    Release date: 2005-01-26
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