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  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • 2. Immigrant Women Archived
    Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111528
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the immigrant women in Canada. Drawing data from the censuses and administrative sources, the chapter looked at the socio-demographic trends of the female population who came to live in Canada as immigrants. The information included growth and geographic distribution of the female immigrant population, the changing make-up of immigrant women in terms of their language profile, country of birth and visible minority status, as well as the categories under which female permanent residents were admitted to Canada. The socio-economic conditions of immigrant women, such as educational attainment, field of study, occupational group, labour market participation, earnings and component of income were examined and compared with women who were born in Canada. While census was the main data source for the analysis of the population's socio-economic situations, where applicable, data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Immigration Data Base were also included.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913257
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this study sheds light on a specific aspect of newcomers' settlement-recognition of their foreign credentials and work experience in relation to their individual characteristics. These characteristics range from class of immigrant (skilled-worker principal applicants, family class, refugees, etc.), education and field of study to country where the highest credential was earned, and knowledge of English or French. The study also examines foreign credential and work experience recognition at three time points over a four-year period-six months, two years and four years after landing.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810713213
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During their initial years in Canada, a significant minority of new immigrants send money to family members in their country of origin. The incidence of remitting among immigrants from different countries ranges from less than 10% to over 60%, and the annual amounts from about $500 to almost $3,000. While financial and family characteristics are consistently significant with the remittance activities of immigrants from all world regions, factors such as sex and education are significant only for immigrants from some regions but not others.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Remittances "the money immigrants send to family members in their country of origin" are now centre stage in development and immigrant research. Yet, in spite of this interest, research on the characteristics of remittance senders in Canada remains quite limited, in large part because of the absence of household survey data. More broadly, studies of remittance senders in Canada and elsewhere often focus on immigrants from only one or two source countries and, consequently, do not provide a broad cross-national perspective on the issue. This study addresses these gaps by using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada to document the incidence of remitting and the amounts remitted by immigrants from a wide range of countries. Using a common set of concepts and methods, we find that the incidence of remitting by the 2000 to 2001 landing cohort ranges from less than 10% to 60% across immigrants from different countries, while the average annual amounts remitted range from about $500 to almost $3,000. Turning to the factors associated with remitting, the financial and family characteristics are consistently significant among immigrants from all world regions. In contrast, other factors, such as gender and education, are associated with remitting among immigrants from some regions but not from others.

    Release date: 2008-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2008003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    The first two reports analyzed the 2006 labour market experiences of immigrants. This third report updates many of these characteristics for 2007, including analysis by province, sex, educational attainment and selected age groups, using 2007 Labour Force Survey data now available.

    Release date: 2008-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The study is the second in a series of analytical articles on immigrants in the labour force based on data from the Labour Force Survey. It sheds light on the relationship between the region or country of birth for immigrants to Canada, when they landed in Canada, and their labour market outcomes (i.e., unemployment, employment and participation rates) in 2006.

    This second report builds on the findings from the original report. It addresses how well immigrants from specific regions or countries of birth fared in the Canadian labour market in 2006.

    Release date: 2008-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810113201
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Where immigrants choose to settle appears to have an impact on their economic integration. It is much faster outside the large urban centres. In the larger urban centres, immigrants face a large initial income disadvantage and subsequent increases are not enough for them to achieve parity with other Canadians. Better economic integration of immigrants outside the larger urban centres is found even after taking into consideration differences in education, ability in an official language, admission class and country of origin.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006273
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent immigration appears to be characterized by frequent return and onward migration. This has important consequences for the contribution of immigrants to the economy of the host country. The return to host country settlement costs may be very low for some immigrants. Lack of longitudinal data has prevented much analysis of whether recent international migration is more like internal migration and not a once-for-all move with a possible return should the move prove to have been a mistake. A newly available longitudinal data set covering all immigrants to Canada since 1980 provides the opportunity to address the issues raised by the new migration. The results show that a large fraction of immigrants, especially among skilled workers and entrepreneurs, are highly internationally mobile.

    Release date: 2006-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06
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  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • 2. Immigrant Women Archived
    Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111528
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the immigrant women in Canada. Drawing data from the censuses and administrative sources, the chapter looked at the socio-demographic trends of the female population who came to live in Canada as immigrants. The information included growth and geographic distribution of the female immigrant population, the changing make-up of immigrant women in terms of their language profile, country of birth and visible minority status, as well as the categories under which female permanent residents were admitted to Canada. The socio-economic conditions of immigrant women, such as educational attainment, field of study, occupational group, labour market participation, earnings and component of income were examined and compared with women who were born in Canada. While census was the main data source for the analysis of the population's socio-economic situations, where applicable, data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Immigration Data Base were also included.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913257
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this study sheds light on a specific aspect of newcomers' settlement-recognition of their foreign credentials and work experience in relation to their individual characteristics. These characteristics range from class of immigrant (skilled-worker principal applicants, family class, refugees, etc.), education and field of study to country where the highest credential was earned, and knowledge of English or French. The study also examines foreign credential and work experience recognition at three time points over a four-year period-six months, two years and four years after landing.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810713213
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During their initial years in Canada, a significant minority of new immigrants send money to family members in their country of origin. The incidence of remitting among immigrants from different countries ranges from less than 10% to over 60%, and the annual amounts from about $500 to almost $3,000. While financial and family characteristics are consistently significant with the remittance activities of immigrants from all world regions, factors such as sex and education are significant only for immigrants from some regions but not others.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Remittances "the money immigrants send to family members in their country of origin" are now centre stage in development and immigrant research. Yet, in spite of this interest, research on the characteristics of remittance senders in Canada remains quite limited, in large part because of the absence of household survey data. More broadly, studies of remittance senders in Canada and elsewhere often focus on immigrants from only one or two source countries and, consequently, do not provide a broad cross-national perspective on the issue. This study addresses these gaps by using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada to document the incidence of remitting and the amounts remitted by immigrants from a wide range of countries. Using a common set of concepts and methods, we find that the incidence of remitting by the 2000 to 2001 landing cohort ranges from less than 10% to 60% across immigrants from different countries, while the average annual amounts remitted range from about $500 to almost $3,000. Turning to the factors associated with remitting, the financial and family characteristics are consistently significant among immigrants from all world regions. In contrast, other factors, such as gender and education, are associated with remitting among immigrants from some regions but not from others.

    Release date: 2008-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2008003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    The first two reports analyzed the 2006 labour market experiences of immigrants. This third report updates many of these characteristics for 2007, including analysis by province, sex, educational attainment and selected age groups, using 2007 Labour Force Survey data now available.

    Release date: 2008-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The study is the second in a series of analytical articles on immigrants in the labour force based on data from the Labour Force Survey. It sheds light on the relationship between the region or country of birth for immigrants to Canada, when they landed in Canada, and their labour market outcomes (i.e., unemployment, employment and participation rates) in 2006.

    This second report builds on the findings from the original report. It addresses how well immigrants from specific regions or countries of birth fared in the Canadian labour market in 2006.

    Release date: 2008-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810113201
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Where immigrants choose to settle appears to have an impact on their economic integration. It is much faster outside the large urban centres. In the larger urban centres, immigrants face a large initial income disadvantage and subsequent increases are not enough for them to achieve parity with other Canadians. Better economic integration of immigrants outside the larger urban centres is found even after taking into consideration differences in education, ability in an official language, admission class and country of origin.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006273
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent immigration appears to be characterized by frequent return and onward migration. This has important consequences for the contribution of immigrants to the economy of the host country. The return to host country settlement costs may be very low for some immigrants. Lack of longitudinal data has prevented much analysis of whether recent international migration is more like internal migration and not a once-for-all move with a possible return should the move prove to have been a mistake. A newly available longitudinal data set covering all immigrants to Canada since 1980 provides the opportunity to address the issues raised by the new migration. The results show that a large fraction of immigrants, especially among skilled workers and entrepreneurs, are highly internationally mobile.

    Release date: 2006-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06
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