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  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200300002
    Description:

    The 2002 Immigration Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) replaced the Immigration Act, 1976 as the primary legislation guiding immigration in Canada. This article summarizes results from a recent study that compared the long-term use of social assistance among resettled refugees arriving under pre-IRPA guidelines (1997 to 2001), during the transition period (2002 to 2004), and post-IRPA (2005 to 2009). The authors used the Longitudinal immigration database (IMDB) to determine whether resettled refugees arriving after the introduction of IRPA were more likely to rely on social assistance than earlier cohorts.

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2019033
    Description:

    Immigrant Mobility by Geography of admission, Geography of residence, Immigrant mobility indicators, Age groups and sex at taxation year, Pre-admission experience, Knowledge of official languages at admission, Immigrant admission category, and admission year.

    Release date: 2021-12-10

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2019003
    Description:

    Immigrant Income, by sex, pre-landing experience, immigrant admission category, knowledge of official languages at admission, years since landing and landing year, for Canada and provinces.

    Release date: 2021-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100600001
    Description:

    This study examines MHCs by immigrants and refugees-compared with those of Canadian-born respondents-while controlling for self-reported mental health and immigrant characteristics, using a population-based survey linked to immigrant landing information. This study, which is based on a linked database, allows for much richer insight into immigrant populations than most previous studies.

    Release date: 2021-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020018
    Description:

    Although refugee claimants seek asylum in Canada for humanitarian reasons, their labour market outcomes play a crucial role in their successful integration, which is why it is important to monitor the degree of labour market success achieved by refugee claimants. This study compares the long-term labour market outcomes of refugee claimants who eventually became permanent residents in Canada (RC-PRs) with those of government-assisted refugees (GARs) and privately sponsored refugees (PSRs), as well as with refugee claimants who did not become permanent residents in Canada (RC-NPRs).

    Release date: 2020-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000800001
    Description:

    This study fills this gap by examining the self-reported mental health (SRMH) of immigrants by admission category and other immigration dimensions (e.g., source world region and duration since landing) and making comparisons with Canadian-born respondents to a population-based survey.

    Release date: 2020-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020004
    Description:

    Unlike economic and family class immigrants, who mostly make their own choice about where to settle in Canada, the initial geographic location of refugees is strongly influenced by government resettlement programs. Government-assisted refugees (GARs) are assigned to one of many designated communities based on a pre-approved regional quota of refugee allocation and the match between a refugee’s needs and community resources. Privately sponsored refugees (PSRs) are received by their sponsors, who are scattered across the country. While previous research suggests that refugees, especially GARs, are more likely to undertake secondary migration than other immigrants, no large-scale quantitative study has compared the rates of departure from initial destination cities for different immigrant categories in the long term. This study compares long-term secondary migration in Canada by immigrant admission category, with a focus on the size of the initial city of settlement.

    Release date: 2020-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019021
    Description:

    Canada was the first country to introduce private sponsorship, and the program has played a key role in the country’s responses to international refugee crises over the last four decades. Private sponsorship has been regarded as a promising policy option for other major Western countries in their commitments to refugee resettlement. However, empirical evidence regarding the economic outcomes of refugee private sponsorship is notably limited. To fill this gap, this paper examined the long-term economic outcomes of privately sponsored refugees (PSRs) with various human capital levels in Canada. It addressed two questions. First, how do the economic outcomes of PSRs compare with those of government-assisted refugees (GARs) in the initial resettlement period and over the longer term? Second, do the economic outcomes of PSRs vary by the refugees’ initial levels of human capital (official language skills and education)?

    Release date: 2020-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019011
    Description:

    From 1980 to 2017, Canada welcomed 1,088,000 refugees, an average of about 30,000 per year. For many refugees, homeownership is an important milestone in their path to social and economic integration. This article in the Economic Insights series highlights new data on homeownership among residents who came to Canada as resettled refugees. It reports on how the stock of refugee-owned housing in Vancouver and Toronto compares to that of Canadian-born residents, highlighting differences in property values across various segments of the housing market. Information on the location, age and size of properties and on the age and income of property owners is used to assess relative differences in property values between the two groups. Estimates are based on data developed by the Canadian Housing Statistics Program, released in December 2018.

    Release date: 2019-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900400001
    Description:

    This study, based on the linked Canadian Community Health Survey-Longitudinal Immigration database, offers a first look at the healthy immigrant effect among selected immigrants arriving under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act by comparing these results with those for their Canadian-born counterparts.

    Release date: 2019-04-17
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

Analysis (26)

Analysis (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200300002
    Description:

    The 2002 Immigration Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) replaced the Immigration Act, 1976 as the primary legislation guiding immigration in Canada. This article summarizes results from a recent study that compared the long-term use of social assistance among resettled refugees arriving under pre-IRPA guidelines (1997 to 2001), during the transition period (2002 to 2004), and post-IRPA (2005 to 2009). The authors used the Longitudinal immigration database (IMDB) to determine whether resettled refugees arriving after the introduction of IRPA were more likely to rely on social assistance than earlier cohorts.

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100600001
    Description:

    This study examines MHCs by immigrants and refugees-compared with those of Canadian-born respondents-while controlling for self-reported mental health and immigrant characteristics, using a population-based survey linked to immigrant landing information. This study, which is based on a linked database, allows for much richer insight into immigrant populations than most previous studies.

    Release date: 2021-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020018
    Description:

    Although refugee claimants seek asylum in Canada for humanitarian reasons, their labour market outcomes play a crucial role in their successful integration, which is why it is important to monitor the degree of labour market success achieved by refugee claimants. This study compares the long-term labour market outcomes of refugee claimants who eventually became permanent residents in Canada (RC-PRs) with those of government-assisted refugees (GARs) and privately sponsored refugees (PSRs), as well as with refugee claimants who did not become permanent residents in Canada (RC-NPRs).

    Release date: 2020-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000800001
    Description:

    This study fills this gap by examining the self-reported mental health (SRMH) of immigrants by admission category and other immigration dimensions (e.g., source world region and duration since landing) and making comparisons with Canadian-born respondents to a population-based survey.

    Release date: 2020-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020004
    Description:

    Unlike economic and family class immigrants, who mostly make their own choice about where to settle in Canada, the initial geographic location of refugees is strongly influenced by government resettlement programs. Government-assisted refugees (GARs) are assigned to one of many designated communities based on a pre-approved regional quota of refugee allocation and the match between a refugee’s needs and community resources. Privately sponsored refugees (PSRs) are received by their sponsors, who are scattered across the country. While previous research suggests that refugees, especially GARs, are more likely to undertake secondary migration than other immigrants, no large-scale quantitative study has compared the rates of departure from initial destination cities for different immigrant categories in the long term. This study compares long-term secondary migration in Canada by immigrant admission category, with a focus on the size of the initial city of settlement.

    Release date: 2020-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019021
    Description:

    Canada was the first country to introduce private sponsorship, and the program has played a key role in the country’s responses to international refugee crises over the last four decades. Private sponsorship has been regarded as a promising policy option for other major Western countries in their commitments to refugee resettlement. However, empirical evidence regarding the economic outcomes of refugee private sponsorship is notably limited. To fill this gap, this paper examined the long-term economic outcomes of privately sponsored refugees (PSRs) with various human capital levels in Canada. It addressed two questions. First, how do the economic outcomes of PSRs compare with those of government-assisted refugees (GARs) in the initial resettlement period and over the longer term? Second, do the economic outcomes of PSRs vary by the refugees’ initial levels of human capital (official language skills and education)?

    Release date: 2020-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019011
    Description:

    From 1980 to 2017, Canada welcomed 1,088,000 refugees, an average of about 30,000 per year. For many refugees, homeownership is an important milestone in their path to social and economic integration. This article in the Economic Insights series highlights new data on homeownership among residents who came to Canada as resettled refugees. It reports on how the stock of refugee-owned housing in Vancouver and Toronto compares to that of Canadian-born residents, highlighting differences in property values across various segments of the housing market. Information on the location, age and size of properties and on the age and income of property owners is used to assess relative differences in property values between the two groups. Estimates are based on data developed by the Canadian Housing Statistics Program, released in December 2018.

    Release date: 2019-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900400001
    Description:

    This study, based on the linked Canadian Community Health Survey-Longitudinal Immigration database, offers a first look at the healthy immigrant effect among selected immigrants arriving under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act by comparing these results with those for their Canadian-born counterparts.

    Release date: 2019-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019007
    Description:

    Canada welcomed over 830,000 refugees from the 1980s to 2000s. However, their economic outcomes, especially the variation among major refugee groups, have not been examined comprehensively. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database, this paper examines the labour market outcomes of refugees from 13 source countries with large inflows to Canada over the 1980-to-2009 period. The analysis first compares employment rates and earnings among refugees from the 13 source countries. It further compares each refugee group with economic-class and family-class immigrants who arrived during the same period.

    Release date: 2019-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100001
    Description:

    In this study, data from the 2016 Census are used to provide a sociodemographic profile of the Syrian refugees who resettled in Canada between January 1, 2015, and May 10, 2016, and who were still living in Canada at the time of the census. This article also analyses the labour market participation of Syrian refugees, and provides some information about their housing conditions.

    Release date: 2019-02-12
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-633-X2017007
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) is a comprehensive source of data that plays a key role in the understanding of the economic behaviour of immigrants. It is the only annual Canadian dataset that allows users to study the characteristics of immigrants to Canada at the time of admission and their economic outcomes and regional (inter-provincial) mobility over a time span of more than 30 years. The IMDB combines administrative files on immigrant admissions and non-permanent resident permits from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) with tax files from the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA). Information is available for immigrant taxfilers admitted since 1980. Tax records for 1982 and subsequent years are available for immigrant taxfilers.

    This report will discuss the IMDB data sources, concepts and variables, record linkage, data processing, dissemination, data evaluation and quality indicators, comparability with other immigration datasets, and the analyses possible with the IMDB.

    Release date: 2017-06-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-611-X
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), conducted jointly by Statistics Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada under the Policy Research Initiative, is a comprehensive survey designed to study the process by which new immigrants adapt to Canadian society. About 12,000 immigrants aged 15 and older who arrived in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001 were interviewed. By late 2005, when all three waves of interviews will have been completed, the survey will provide a better understanding of how the settlement process unfolds for new immigrants.

    The results of this survey will provide valuable information on how immigrants are meeting various challenges associated with integration and what resources are most helpful to their settlement in Canada. The main topics being investigated include housing, education, foreign credentials recognition, employment, income, the development and use of social networks, language skills, health, values and attitudes, and satisfaction with the settlement experience.

    Release date: 2003-09-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-217-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication describes the structure and administration of provincial/territorial legal aid services in Canada. It also includes information on legislation, organization, coverage, eligibility, duty counsel and tariffs.

    Release date: 2002-05-24
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