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All (58) (0 to 10 of 58 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202400300001
    Description: As the importance of subjective well-being to health continues to garner increasing attention from researchers and policy makers, community belonging has emerged as a potential population health target that has been linked to several self-rated measures of health and well-being in Canada. This study assessed novel area-level community belonging measures derived using small area estimation and examined associations with individual-level measures of community belonging and self-rated health.
    Release date: 2024-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2023004
    Description: This paper examines the social ties that Canadians have in their neighbourhoods, identified in terms of their social contact with neighbours, trust in people in their neighbourhood, and sense of inclusion and belonging. Long-term residents in lower-income neighbourhoods are of particular interest. Supports and resources derived from local ties may be particularly important for this group, given generally modest economic resources and sociodemographic characteristics such as health, household composition and age.
    Release date: 2023-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300100003
    Description: Quality of life and well-being research often involves survey content that is subjective in nature, for example questions pertaining to life satisfaction. Two phenomena impacting responses to self-reported life satisfaction are studied across a range of social surveys: the framing effect, where a respondent’s answer is influenced by the theme of the survey or its content; and the mode effect, where a respondent’s answer is influenced by the method in which survey data is collected (with an interviewer, through an online collection portal, etc.). The objective of this paper is to document the effect that survey collection and survey content have on Canadians’ self-reported satisfaction with their lives. The impact of these effects on life satisfaction responses is measured across three Statistics Canada survey series: the General Social Survey, the Canadian Community Health Survey, and the Canadian Social Survey.
    Release date: 2023-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200400002
    Description:

    Statistics Canada continues develop and refine neighbourhood-level information to answer questions about where Canadians live and how this affects their lives. Based on a sample of almost 50,000 survey respondents, residing in 6,481 neighbourhoods, across 29 CMAs in Canada, this article compares the neighbourhood characteristics of individuals in the bottom 20% of the family income distribution with those in the other 80% of the income distribution. This focus is taken given the primary role that family income plays in shaping housing options and decisions, and the prospects that those in the bottom 20% are most constrained in this respect.

    Release date: 2022-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200400004
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it have contributed to, and probably accelerated, the roles that the internet and digital technologies play in our lives, thrusting large numbers of people and organizations online. But internet and digital skills vary and not everyone had the same capacity to rapidly shift activities of daily life online. The objective of this paper is to document the changes in the online activities and skills reported by Canadians prior to, and during, the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from 2018 and 2020 Canadian Internet Use Surveys are used to categorize Canadians into one of five internet user groups, ranging from non-users to advanced users.

    Release date: 2022-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2022004
    Description:

    This paper examines whether individuals in population groups of interest—specifically individuals in low-income families, those in single-parent families, those with mood or anxiety disorders, those in designated visible minorities categories and immigrants—tend to reside in neighbourhoods with different characteristics. It does so by using a new, integrated dataset that incorporates neighbourhood measures from multiple sources with the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2022-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200005
    Description:

    Using 2016 Census and administrative data, this study estimates the differences in weekly earnings received by workers in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined by the Employment Equity Act, employed in four broad sectors of the Canadian workforce. Of central interest is whether differences in weekly earnings between these categories were larger in small and medium-size commercial enterprises than they were in large commercial enterprises and in organizations and enterprises in the non-commercial sector.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200100004
    Description:

    Using data from the 2016 Census, this study compares the weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined in the Employment Equity Act. This paper addresses three sets of research questions. First, in 2015, were there significant differences in the estimated weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority categories relative to White people? Among which designated visible minority categories were differences in weekly earnings largest? Were these differences similar among women and men? Second, to what extent did sociodemographic and employment characteristics account for differences in average weekly earnings across designated visible minority and White categories? And third, were differences in average weekly earnings narrower, wider or about the same in 2015 as in 2005?

    Release date: 2022-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2021007
    Description:

    Statistics Canada continues to use a variety of data sources to provide neighbourhood-level variables across an expanding set of domains, such as sociodemographic characteristics, income, services and amenities, crime, and the environment. Yet, despite these advances, information on the social aspects of neighbourhoods is still unavailable. In this paper, answers to the Canadian Community Health Survey on respondents’ sense of belonging to their local community were pooled over the four survey years from 2016 to 2019. Individual responses were aggregated up to the census tract (CT) level.

    Release date: 2021-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2021008
    Description:

    A robust Internet typology is essential for monitoring how individuals are responding to the digital transformation and for assessing the divide between digital ‘haves’ and ‘have nots.’ Individuals’ capacities to use the Internet and digital technologies are an important aspect of this digital divide. Using data from the 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS), this study presents an Internet-use typology that is based on the range and complexity of online activities and digital skills that Canadians report they perform. Five Internet-user groups are identified.

    Release date: 2021-11-09
Stats in brief (2)

Stats in brief (2) ((2 results))

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100093
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has had unprecedented impacts on many key aspects of life, such as health, social connections, mobility, employment and incomes. Life satisfaction provides the best available umbrella measure of the combined effects of these changes on the well-being of Canadians. Using population-representative samples from two Statistics Canada surveys, this study compares the life satisfaction of Canadians before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-12-21

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100009
    Description:

    With ‘stay at home' essential to the COVID-19 response, the dwellings in which people live take on added importance in their lives. Extended time indoors is likely to raise various challenges, such as getting physical exercise, maintaining social contacts, or balancing telework, children and home schooling, and household routines in a confined space.

    Release date: 2020-05-04
Articles and reports (55)

Articles and reports (55) (0 to 10 of 55 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202400300001
    Description: As the importance of subjective well-being to health continues to garner increasing attention from researchers and policy makers, community belonging has emerged as a potential population health target that has been linked to several self-rated measures of health and well-being in Canada. This study assessed novel area-level community belonging measures derived using small area estimation and examined associations with individual-level measures of community belonging and self-rated health.
    Release date: 2024-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2023004
    Description: This paper examines the social ties that Canadians have in their neighbourhoods, identified in terms of their social contact with neighbours, trust in people in their neighbourhood, and sense of inclusion and belonging. Long-term residents in lower-income neighbourhoods are of particular interest. Supports and resources derived from local ties may be particularly important for this group, given generally modest economic resources and sociodemographic characteristics such as health, household composition and age.
    Release date: 2023-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300100003
    Description: Quality of life and well-being research often involves survey content that is subjective in nature, for example questions pertaining to life satisfaction. Two phenomena impacting responses to self-reported life satisfaction are studied across a range of social surveys: the framing effect, where a respondent’s answer is influenced by the theme of the survey or its content; and the mode effect, where a respondent’s answer is influenced by the method in which survey data is collected (with an interviewer, through an online collection portal, etc.). The objective of this paper is to document the effect that survey collection and survey content have on Canadians’ self-reported satisfaction with their lives. The impact of these effects on life satisfaction responses is measured across three Statistics Canada survey series: the General Social Survey, the Canadian Community Health Survey, and the Canadian Social Survey.
    Release date: 2023-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200400002
    Description:

    Statistics Canada continues develop and refine neighbourhood-level information to answer questions about where Canadians live and how this affects their lives. Based on a sample of almost 50,000 survey respondents, residing in 6,481 neighbourhoods, across 29 CMAs in Canada, this article compares the neighbourhood characteristics of individuals in the bottom 20% of the family income distribution with those in the other 80% of the income distribution. This focus is taken given the primary role that family income plays in shaping housing options and decisions, and the prospects that those in the bottom 20% are most constrained in this respect.

    Release date: 2022-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200400004
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it have contributed to, and probably accelerated, the roles that the internet and digital technologies play in our lives, thrusting large numbers of people and organizations online. But internet and digital skills vary and not everyone had the same capacity to rapidly shift activities of daily life online. The objective of this paper is to document the changes in the online activities and skills reported by Canadians prior to, and during, the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from 2018 and 2020 Canadian Internet Use Surveys are used to categorize Canadians into one of five internet user groups, ranging from non-users to advanced users.

    Release date: 2022-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2022004
    Description:

    This paper examines whether individuals in population groups of interest—specifically individuals in low-income families, those in single-parent families, those with mood or anxiety disorders, those in designated visible minorities categories and immigrants—tend to reside in neighbourhoods with different characteristics. It does so by using a new, integrated dataset that incorporates neighbourhood measures from multiple sources with the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2022-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200005
    Description:

    Using 2016 Census and administrative data, this study estimates the differences in weekly earnings received by workers in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined by the Employment Equity Act, employed in four broad sectors of the Canadian workforce. Of central interest is whether differences in weekly earnings between these categories were larger in small and medium-size commercial enterprises than they were in large commercial enterprises and in organizations and enterprises in the non-commercial sector.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200100004
    Description:

    Using data from the 2016 Census, this study compares the weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority and White categories, as defined in the Employment Equity Act. This paper addresses three sets of research questions. First, in 2015, were there significant differences in the estimated weekly earnings of individuals in designated visible minority categories relative to White people? Among which designated visible minority categories were differences in weekly earnings largest? Were these differences similar among women and men? Second, to what extent did sociodemographic and employment characteristics account for differences in average weekly earnings across designated visible minority and White categories? And third, were differences in average weekly earnings narrower, wider or about the same in 2015 as in 2005?

    Release date: 2022-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2021007
    Description:

    Statistics Canada continues to use a variety of data sources to provide neighbourhood-level variables across an expanding set of domains, such as sociodemographic characteristics, income, services and amenities, crime, and the environment. Yet, despite these advances, information on the social aspects of neighbourhoods is still unavailable. In this paper, answers to the Canadian Community Health Survey on respondents’ sense of belonging to their local community were pooled over the four survey years from 2016 to 2019. Individual responses were aggregated up to the census tract (CT) level.

    Release date: 2021-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2021008
    Description:

    A robust Internet typology is essential for monitoring how individuals are responding to the digital transformation and for assessing the divide between digital ‘haves’ and ‘have nots.’ Individuals’ capacities to use the Internet and digital technologies are an important aspect of this digital divide. Using data from the 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS), this study presents an Internet-use typology that is based on the range and complexity of online activities and digital skills that Canadians report they perform. Five Internet-user groups are identified.

    Release date: 2021-11-09
Journals and periodicals (1)

Journals and periodicals (1) ((1 result))

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-519-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report depicts the demographic characteristics, health and wellness, living arrangements, social networks and social participation, security from crime and victimization, work patterns and related activities, income and expenditures, and lifestyles of the population aged 65 and over. It examines many of these issues, where data allow, in terms of different age groups within the senior population, for example those aged 65 to 74 and those aged 85 and over. Information are also presented for individuals in the 55 to 64 age range.

    The report also includes a chapter on Aboriginal seniors and a chapter on immigrant seniors.

    It presents the most comprehensive statistical picture of the situation of Canada's senior population with data drawn from a wide array of sources including the census, as well as other surveys such as the National Population Health Survey, General Social Survey, Canadian Community Health Survey, and Survey of Labour and Income dynamics.

    Release date: 2007-02-27
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