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All (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202400100002
    Description: The increase in work from home triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic directly decreased public transit use. While this increase in work from home likely reduced commuting and greenhouse gas emissions caused by transportation, it also put downward pressure on the revenues and ridership of urban public transit systems. This article assesses the degree to which the increase in work from home observed in Canada in recent years may have reduced the number of public transit commuters from 2016 to 2023 in urban areas.
    Release date: 2024-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202301100004
    Description: There is considerable policy interest in engaging hard-to-reach populations in Canada and integrating them into the tax system so they can receive the benefits intended to support them. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database, this study provides insights into the tax-filing behaviour of newly landed immigrants and their families over time in Canada.
    Release date: 2023-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300500002
    Description: The financial security of seniors has long been a concern, especially in recent years, against the backdrop of an aging population. This study analyzes the extent to which pre-retirement lifestyles can be maintained into retirement years by comparing family incomes of five cohorts of individuals as they age from their mid 50s to late 70s.
    Release date: 2023-05-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300400003
    Description: While past Canadian studies have assessed the short-term impact of divorce and widowhood on living standards during retirement years, less is known about the long-term impact and how living standards compare across cohorts. This study follows five cohorts of individuals as they age from their mid 50s to their late 70s.
    Release date: 2023-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200500001
    Description:

    One commonly held view of telework is that prior to COVID-19, teleworkers might have been promoted less often than other employees or might have declined job offers for high-paying jobs that did not offer the opportunity to work from home. Such scenarios imply that prior to COVID-19, employees working from home would have experienced lower wage growth in the long term than other employees. This study assesses whether this is the case using integrated data from Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File (LWF) and the 2006 and 2016 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2022-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200001
    Description:

    The substantial increase in telework observed since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic has raised the possibility that in the near future, some Canadian workers might be able to work from home for an employer located in another province or territory. This article focuses on this group of teleworkers and assesses the amount of people who worked remotely, the groups that were more likely to telecommute, their compensation compared to that of other teleworkers, and the amount of teleworkers that are likely to work remotely in the future.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100500001
    Description:

    As is now well known, the COVID-19 pandemic substantially increased work from home in Canada. This “Spotlight on data and research” estimates to what extent Canadians would prefer working from home once the COVID-19 pandemic is over. The answer has potentially significant implications for future traffic congestion, public transit use, greenhouse gas emissions, demand for office space in city centres and for housing in suburbs, and the dynamism (or lack thereof) of retail trade stores and restaurants located in downtown areas.

    Release date: 2021-05-26

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100012
    Description:

    To what extent are teleworkers more or less productive now relative to when they were at their usual place of work? For those who are less productive, what are the main barriers to productivity? Once the pandemic is over, how many Canadians would prefer to work most of their hours at home or outside the home?

    Answers to these questions are crucial to inform discussions about the sustainability of telework in a post COVID-19 context.

    To shed light on these questions, this study uses the supplement to the Labour Force Survey of February 2021.

    Release date: 2021-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2020004
    Description:

    Statistics Canada has undertaken a broad range of initiatives designed to understand the impacts of COVID-19 on Canadians. This research paper highlights experimental methods designed to measure the impact of the pandemic on month-by-month family income trends of Canadians long before detailed annual statistics become available. The approach integrates weekly earnings available from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) together with information specific to government transfers including special COVID-19 benefits collected through administrative data sources and imputation. The objective is to shed light on the impact of labour market disruptions on Canadians and their families and the extent to which emergency benefits introduced by the government offset these disruptions. This paper describes the data sources used, estimation strategies employed, initial results, limitations, and potential future developments.

    Release date: 2020-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020081
    Description:

    Income data for Canadian tax filers shed light on the distribution of income in 2018. This infographic illuminates selected characteristics of the top 1% of tax filers in Canada that year, including information on age, gender, and geographic location. The top 1% of tax filers is defined as the 1% of tax filers with the highest total incomes when ranked nationally. These estimates are for a pre-pandemic period and do not reflect any impacts of COVID-19. However, they do provide a baseline for analysing changes to the top of the income distribution during the pandemic period, once those data become available.

    Release date: 2020-11-18
Stats in brief (2)

Stats in brief (2) ((2 results))

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202100100012
    Description:

    To what extent are teleworkers more or less productive now relative to when they were at their usual place of work? For those who are less productive, what are the main barriers to productivity? Once the pandemic is over, how many Canadians would prefer to work most of their hours at home or outside the home?

    Answers to these questions are crucial to inform discussions about the sustainability of telework in a post COVID-19 context.

    To shed light on these questions, this study uses the supplement to the Labour Force Survey of February 2021.

    Release date: 2021-04-01

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020081
    Description:

    Income data for Canadian tax filers shed light on the distribution of income in 2018. This infographic illuminates selected characteristics of the top 1% of tax filers in Canada that year, including information on age, gender, and geographic location. The top 1% of tax filers is defined as the 1% of tax filers with the highest total incomes when ranked nationally. These estimates are for a pre-pandemic period and do not reflect any impacts of COVID-19. However, they do provide a baseline for analysing changes to the top of the income distribution during the pandemic period, once those data become available.

    Release date: 2020-11-18
Articles and reports (9)

Articles and reports (9) ((9 results))

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202400100002
    Description: The increase in work from home triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic directly decreased public transit use. While this increase in work from home likely reduced commuting and greenhouse gas emissions caused by transportation, it also put downward pressure on the revenues and ridership of urban public transit systems. This article assesses the degree to which the increase in work from home observed in Canada in recent years may have reduced the number of public transit commuters from 2016 to 2023 in urban areas.
    Release date: 2024-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202301100004
    Description: There is considerable policy interest in engaging hard-to-reach populations in Canada and integrating them into the tax system so they can receive the benefits intended to support them. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database, this study provides insights into the tax-filing behaviour of newly landed immigrants and their families over time in Canada.
    Release date: 2023-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300500002
    Description: The financial security of seniors has long been a concern, especially in recent years, against the backdrop of an aging population. This study analyzes the extent to which pre-retirement lifestyles can be maintained into retirement years by comparing family incomes of five cohorts of individuals as they age from their mid 50s to late 70s.
    Release date: 2023-05-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300400003
    Description: While past Canadian studies have assessed the short-term impact of divorce and widowhood on living standards during retirement years, less is known about the long-term impact and how living standards compare across cohorts. This study follows five cohorts of individuals as they age from their mid 50s to their late 70s.
    Release date: 2023-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200500001
    Description:

    One commonly held view of telework is that prior to COVID-19, teleworkers might have been promoted less often than other employees or might have declined job offers for high-paying jobs that did not offer the opportunity to work from home. Such scenarios imply that prior to COVID-19, employees working from home would have experienced lower wage growth in the long term than other employees. This study assesses whether this is the case using integrated data from Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File (LWF) and the 2006 and 2016 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2022-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200001
    Description:

    The substantial increase in telework observed since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic has raised the possibility that in the near future, some Canadian workers might be able to work from home for an employer located in another province or territory. This article focuses on this group of teleworkers and assesses the amount of people who worked remotely, the groups that were more likely to telecommute, their compensation compared to that of other teleworkers, and the amount of teleworkers that are likely to work remotely in the future.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100500001
    Description:

    As is now well known, the COVID-19 pandemic substantially increased work from home in Canada. This “Spotlight on data and research” estimates to what extent Canadians would prefer working from home once the COVID-19 pandemic is over. The answer has potentially significant implications for future traffic congestion, public transit use, greenhouse gas emissions, demand for office space in city centres and for housing in suburbs, and the dynamism (or lack thereof) of retail trade stores and restaurants located in downtown areas.

    Release date: 2021-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2020004
    Description:

    Statistics Canada has undertaken a broad range of initiatives designed to understand the impacts of COVID-19 on Canadians. This research paper highlights experimental methods designed to measure the impact of the pandemic on month-by-month family income trends of Canadians long before detailed annual statistics become available. The approach integrates weekly earnings available from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) together with information specific to government transfers including special COVID-19 benefits collected through administrative data sources and imputation. The objective is to shed light on the impact of labour market disruptions on Canadians and their families and the extent to which emergency benefits introduced by the government offset these disruptions. This paper describes the data sources used, estimation strategies employed, initial results, limitations, and potential future developments.

    Release date: 2020-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018412
    Description:

    This study assesses job quality in Canada using an internationally inspired multidimensional framework that covers six broad aspects: income and benefits, career prospects, work intensity, working-time quality, skills and discretion, and social environment. The analysis uses the 2016 General Social Survey, which collected a rich set of information on working conditions in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-12-10
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

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