Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

91 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Portal

    Content

    1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
    Sort Help
    entries

    Results

    All (2,018)

    All (2,018) (0 to 10 of 2,018 results)

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100001
      Description:

      For several decades, national statistical agencies around the world have been using probability surveys as their preferred tool to meet information needs about a population of interest. In the last few years, there has been a wind of change and other data sources are being increasingly explored. Five key factors are behind this trend: the decline in response rates in probability surveys, the high cost of data collection, the increased burden on respondents, the desire for access to “real-time” statistics, and the proliferation of non-probability data sources. Some people have even come to believe that probability surveys could gradually disappear. In this article, we review some approaches that can reduce, or even eliminate, the use of probability surveys, all the while preserving a valid statistical inference framework. All the approaches we consider use data from a non-probability source; data from a probability survey are also used in most cases. Some of these approaches rely on the validity of model assumptions, which contrasts with approaches based on the probability sampling design. These design-based approaches are generally not as efficient; yet, they are not subject to the risk of bias due to model misspecification.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100002
      Description:

      Model-based methods are required to estimate small area parameters of interest, such as totals and means, when traditional direct estimation methods cannot provide adequate precision. Unit level and area level models are the most commonly used ones in practice. In the case of the unit level model, efficient model-based estimators can be obtained if the sample design is such that the sample and population models coincide: that is, the sampling design is non-informative for the model. If on the other hand, the sampling design is informative for the model, the selection probabilities will be related to the variable of interest, even after conditioning on the available auxiliary data. This will imply that the population model no longer holds for the sample. Pfeffermann and Sverchkov (2007) used the relationships between the population and sample distribution of the study variable to obtain approximately unbiased semi-parametric predictors of the area means under informative sampling schemes. Their procedure is valid for both sampled and non-sampled areas.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100003
      Description:

      Probability sampling designs are sometimes used in conjunction with model-based predictors of finite population quantities. These designs should minimize the anticipated variance (AV), which is the variance over both the superpopulation and sampling processes, of the predictor of interest. The AV-optimal design is well known for model-assisted estimators which attain the Godambe-Joshi lower bound for the AV of design-unbiased estimators. However, no optimal probability designs have been found for model-based prediction, except under conditions such that the model-based and model-assisted estimators coincide; these cases can be limiting. This paper shows that the Godambe-Joshi lower bound is an upper bound for the AV of the best linear unbiased estimator of a population total, where the upper bound is over the space of all covariate sets. Therefore model-assisted optimal designs are a sensible choice for model-based prediction when there is uncertainty about the form of the final model, as there often would be prior to conducting the survey. Simulations confirm the result over a range of scenarios, including when the relationship between the target and auxiliary variables is nonlinear and modeled using splines. The AV is lowest relative to the bound when an important design variable is not associated with the target variable.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100004
      Description:

      Cut-off sampling is applied when there is a subset of units from the population from which getting the required information is too expensive or difficult and, therefore, those units are deliberately excluded from sample selection. If those excluded units are different from the sampled ones in the characteristics of interest, naïve estimators may be severely biased. Calibration estimators have been proposed to reduce the design-bias. However, when estimating in small domains, they can be inefficient even in the absence of cut-off sampling. Model-based small area estimation methods may prove useful for reducing the bias due to cut-off sampling if the assumed model holds for the whole population. At the same time, for small domains, these methods provide more efficient estimators than calibration methods. Since model-based properties are obtained assuming that the model holds but no model is exactly true, here we analyze the design properties of calibration and model-based procedures for estimation of small domain characteristics under cut-off sampling. Our results confirm that model-based estimators reduce the bias due to cut-off sampling and perform significantly better in terms of design mean squared error.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100005
      Description:

      Selecting the right sample size is central to ensure the quality of a survey. The state of the art is to account for complex sampling designs by calculating effective sample sizes. These effective sample sizes are determined using the design effect of central variables of interest. However, in face-to-face surveys empirical estimates of design effects are often suspected to be conflated with the impact of the interviewers. This typically leads to an over-estimation of design effects and consequently risks misallocating resources towards a higher sample size instead of using more interviewers or improving measurement accuracy. Therefore, we propose a corrected design effect that separates the interviewer effect from the effects of the sampling design on the sampling variance. The ability to estimate the corrected design effect is tested using a simulation study. In this respect, we address disentangling cluster and interviewer variance. Corrected design effects are estimated for data from the European Social Survey (ESS) round 6 and compared with conventional design effect estimates. Furthermore, we show that for some countries in the ESS round 6 the estimates of conventional design effect are indeed strongly inflated by interviewer effects.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100006
      Description:

      In surveys, logical boundaries among variables or among waves of surveys make imputation of missing values complicated. We propose a new regression-based multiple imputation method to deal with survey nonresponses with two-sided logical boundaries. This imputation method automatically satisfies the boundary conditions without an additional acceptance/rejection procedure and utilizes the boundary information to derive an imputed value and to determine the suitability of the imputed value. Simulation results show that our new imputation method outperforms the existing imputation methods for both mean and quantile estimations regardless of missing rates, error distributions, and missing-mechanisms. We apply our method to impute the self-reported variable “years of smoking” in successive health screenings of Koreans.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Journals and periodicals: 12-001-X
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      The journal publishes articles dealing with various aspects of statistical development relevant to a statistical agency, such as design issues in the context of practical constraints, use of different data sources and collection techniques, total survey error, survey evaluation, research in survey methodology, time series analysis, seasonal adjustment, demographic studies, data integration, estimation and data analysis methods, and general survey systems development. The emphasis is placed on the development and evaluation of specific methodologies as applied to data collection or the data themselves.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2020002
      Description:

      This documentation outlines the methodology used to develop the Distributions of household economic accounts published in June 2020 for the reference years 2010 to 2019. It describes the framework and the steps implemented to produce distributional information aligned with the National balance sheet accounts and other national accounts concepts. It also includes a report on the quality of the estimated distributions.

      Release date: 2020-06-26

    • Public use microdata: 89F0002X
      Description:

      The SPSD/M is a static microsimulation model designed to analyse financial interactions between governments and individuals in Canada. It can compute taxes paid to and cash transfers received from government. It is comprised of a database, a series of tax/transfer algorithms and models, analytical software and user documentation. Glass box versions of the model include alternate algorithms, which allow users to model changes that cannot be modelled easily using the standard SPSD/M.

      Release date: 2020-06-22

    • Table: 11-10-0074-01
      Geography: Census tract
      Frequency: Occasional
      Description:

      The divergence index (D-index) describes the degree that families with different income levels are mixing together in neighbourhoods. It compares neighbourhood (census tract, CT) discrete income distributions to a base distribution, which is the income quintiles of the neighbourhood’s census metropolitan area (CMA).

      Release date: 2020-06-22
    Data (8)

    Data (8) ((8 results))

    • Public use microdata: 89F0002X
      Description:

      The SPSD/M is a static microsimulation model designed to analyse financial interactions between governments and individuals in Canada. It can compute taxes paid to and cash transfers received from government. It is comprised of a database, a series of tax/transfer algorithms and models, analytical software and user documentation. Glass box versions of the model include alternate algorithms, which allow users to model changes that cannot be modelled easily using the standard SPSD/M.

      Release date: 2020-06-22

    • Table: 11-10-0074-01
      Geography: Census tract
      Frequency: Occasional
      Description:

      The divergence index (D-index) describes the degree that families with different income levels are mixing together in neighbourhoods. It compares neighbourhood (census tract, CT) discrete income distributions to a base distribution, which is the income quintiles of the neighbourhood’s census metropolitan area (CMA).

      Release date: 2020-06-22

    • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2020010
      Description:

      The Canadian Statistical Geospatial Explorer empowers users to discover geo enabled data holdings of Statistics Canada at various levels of geography including at the neighbourhood level. Users are able to visualize, thematically map, spatially explore and analyze, export and consume data in various formats. Users can also view the data superimposed on satellite imagery, topographic and street layers.

      Release date: 2020-04-23

    • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2019010
      Description:

      The Housing Data Viewer is a visualization tool that allows users to explore Statistics Canada data on a map. Users can use the tool to navigate, compare and export data.

      Release date: 2019-10-30

    • Table: 53-500-X
      Description:

      This report presents the results of a pilot survey conducted by Statistics Canada to measure the fuel consumption of on-road motor vehicles registered in Canada. This study was carried out in connection with the Canadian Vehicle Survey (CVS) which collects information on road activity such as distance traveled, number of passengers and trip purpose.

      Release date: 2004-10-21

    • Table: 13-220-X
      Description:

      In the 1997 edition, new and revised benchmarks were introduced for 1992 and 1988. The indicators are used to monitor supply, demand and employment for tourism in Canada on a timely basis. The annual tables are derived using the National Income and Expenditure Accounts (NIEA) and various industry and travel surveys. Tables providing actual data and percentage changes, for seasonally adjusted current and constant price estimates are included. In addition, an analytical section provides graphs, and time series of first differences, percentage changes, and seasonal factors for selected indicators. Data are published from 1987 and the publication will be available on the day of release. New data are included in the demand tables for non-tourism commodities produced by non-tourism industries and in the employment tables covering direct tourism employment generated by non-tourism industries. This product was commissioned by the Canadian Tourism Commission to provide annual updates for the Tourism Satellite Account.

      Release date: 2003-01-08

    • Table: 11-516-X
      Description:

      The second edition of Historical statistics of Canada was jointly produced by the Social Science Federation of Canada and Statistics Canada in 1983. This volume contains about 1,088 statistical tables on the social, economic and institutional conditions of Canada from the start of Confederation in 1867 to the mid-1970s. The tables are arranged in sections with an introduction explaining the content of each section, the principal sources of data for each table, and general explanatory notes regarding the statistics. In most cases, there is sufficient description of the individual series to enable the reader to use them without consulting the numerous basic sources referenced in the publication.

      The electronic version of this historical publication is accessible on the Internet site of Statistics Canada as a free downloadable document: text as HTML pages and all tables as individual spreadsheets in a comma delimited format (CSV) (which allows online viewing or downloading).

      Release date: 1999-07-29

    • Table: 82-567-X
      Description:

      The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) is designed to enhance the understanding of the processes affecting health. The survey collects cross-sectional as well as longitudinal data. In 1994/95 the survey interviewed a panel of 17,276 individuals, then returned to interview them a second time in 1996/97. The response rate for these individuals was 96% in 1996/97. Data collection from the panel will continue for up to two decades. For cross-sectional purposes, data were collected for a total of 81,000 household residents in all provinces (except people on Indian reserves or on Canadian Forces bases) in 1996/97.

      This overview illustrates the variety of information available by presenting data on perceived health, chronic conditions, injuries, repetitive strains, depression, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, consultations with medical professionals, use of medications and use of alternative medicine.

      Release date: 1998-07-29
    Analysis (1,557)

    Analysis (1,557) (0 to 10 of 1,557 results)

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100001
      Description:

      For several decades, national statistical agencies around the world have been using probability surveys as their preferred tool to meet information needs about a population of interest. In the last few years, there has been a wind of change and other data sources are being increasingly explored. Five key factors are behind this trend: the decline in response rates in probability surveys, the high cost of data collection, the increased burden on respondents, the desire for access to “real-time” statistics, and the proliferation of non-probability data sources. Some people have even come to believe that probability surveys could gradually disappear. In this article, we review some approaches that can reduce, or even eliminate, the use of probability surveys, all the while preserving a valid statistical inference framework. All the approaches we consider use data from a non-probability source; data from a probability survey are also used in most cases. Some of these approaches rely on the validity of model assumptions, which contrasts with approaches based on the probability sampling design. These design-based approaches are generally not as efficient; yet, they are not subject to the risk of bias due to model misspecification.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100002
      Description:

      Model-based methods are required to estimate small area parameters of interest, such as totals and means, when traditional direct estimation methods cannot provide adequate precision. Unit level and area level models are the most commonly used ones in practice. In the case of the unit level model, efficient model-based estimators can be obtained if the sample design is such that the sample and population models coincide: that is, the sampling design is non-informative for the model. If on the other hand, the sampling design is informative for the model, the selection probabilities will be related to the variable of interest, even after conditioning on the available auxiliary data. This will imply that the population model no longer holds for the sample. Pfeffermann and Sverchkov (2007) used the relationships between the population and sample distribution of the study variable to obtain approximately unbiased semi-parametric predictors of the area means under informative sampling schemes. Their procedure is valid for both sampled and non-sampled areas.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100003
      Description:

      Probability sampling designs are sometimes used in conjunction with model-based predictors of finite population quantities. These designs should minimize the anticipated variance (AV), which is the variance over both the superpopulation and sampling processes, of the predictor of interest. The AV-optimal design is well known for model-assisted estimators which attain the Godambe-Joshi lower bound for the AV of design-unbiased estimators. However, no optimal probability designs have been found for model-based prediction, except under conditions such that the model-based and model-assisted estimators coincide; these cases can be limiting. This paper shows that the Godambe-Joshi lower bound is an upper bound for the AV of the best linear unbiased estimator of a population total, where the upper bound is over the space of all covariate sets. Therefore model-assisted optimal designs are a sensible choice for model-based prediction when there is uncertainty about the form of the final model, as there often would be prior to conducting the survey. Simulations confirm the result over a range of scenarios, including when the relationship between the target and auxiliary variables is nonlinear and modeled using splines. The AV is lowest relative to the bound when an important design variable is not associated with the target variable.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100004
      Description:

      Cut-off sampling is applied when there is a subset of units from the population from which getting the required information is too expensive or difficult and, therefore, those units are deliberately excluded from sample selection. If those excluded units are different from the sampled ones in the characteristics of interest, naïve estimators may be severely biased. Calibration estimators have been proposed to reduce the design-bias. However, when estimating in small domains, they can be inefficient even in the absence of cut-off sampling. Model-based small area estimation methods may prove useful for reducing the bias due to cut-off sampling if the assumed model holds for the whole population. At the same time, for small domains, these methods provide more efficient estimators than calibration methods. Since model-based properties are obtained assuming that the model holds but no model is exactly true, here we analyze the design properties of calibration and model-based procedures for estimation of small domain characteristics under cut-off sampling. Our results confirm that model-based estimators reduce the bias due to cut-off sampling and perform significantly better in terms of design mean squared error.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100005
      Description:

      Selecting the right sample size is central to ensure the quality of a survey. The state of the art is to account for complex sampling designs by calculating effective sample sizes. These effective sample sizes are determined using the design effect of central variables of interest. However, in face-to-face surveys empirical estimates of design effects are often suspected to be conflated with the impact of the interviewers. This typically leads to an over-estimation of design effects and consequently risks misallocating resources towards a higher sample size instead of using more interviewers or improving measurement accuracy. Therefore, we propose a corrected design effect that separates the interviewer effect from the effects of the sampling design on the sampling variance. The ability to estimate the corrected design effect is tested using a simulation study. In this respect, we address disentangling cluster and interviewer variance. Corrected design effects are estimated for data from the European Social Survey (ESS) round 6 and compared with conventional design effect estimates. Furthermore, we show that for some countries in the ESS round 6 the estimates of conventional design effect are indeed strongly inflated by interviewer effects.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202000100006
      Description:

      In surveys, logical boundaries among variables or among waves of surveys make imputation of missing values complicated. We propose a new regression-based multiple imputation method to deal with survey nonresponses with two-sided logical boundaries. This imputation method automatically satisfies the boundary conditions without an additional acceptance/rejection procedure and utilizes the boundary information to derive an imputed value and to determine the suitability of the imputed value. Simulation results show that our new imputation method outperforms the existing imputation methods for both mean and quantile estimations regardless of missing rates, error distributions, and missing-mechanisms. We apply our method to impute the self-reported variable “years of smoking” in successive health screenings of Koreans.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Journals and periodicals: 12-001-X
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      The journal publishes articles dealing with various aspects of statistical development relevant to a statistical agency, such as design issues in the context of practical constraints, use of different data sources and collection techniques, total survey error, survey evaluation, research in survey methodology, time series analysis, seasonal adjustment, demographic studies, data integration, estimation and data analysis methods, and general survey systems development. The emphasis is placed on the development and evaluation of specific methodologies as applied to data collection or the data themselves.

      Release date: 2020-06-30

    • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2020002
      Description:

      This documentation outlines the methodology used to develop the Distributions of household economic accounts published in June 2020 for the reference years 2010 to 2019. It describes the framework and the steps implemented to produce distributional information aligned with the National balance sheet accounts and other national accounts concepts. It also includes a report on the quality of the estimated distributions.

      Release date: 2020-06-26

    • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000300001
      Description:

      This study describes the characteristics of residential postal codes of the Canadian population using the 2016 Census and determines how frequently these postal codes are matched to one or more dissemination areas, a unit of census geography.

      Release date: 2020-06-17

    • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2020009
      Description:

      A summary of methodological treatments as applied to the May 2020 CPI in response to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on price collection, price availability, and business closures.

      Release date: 2020-06-17
    Reference (454)

    Reference (454) (0 to 10 of 454 results)

    • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X
      Description:

      This product contains articles related to the latest methodological, conceptual developments in the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts as well as the analysis of the Canadian economy. It includes articles detailing new methods, concepts and statistical techniques used to compile the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts. It also includes information related to new or expanded data products, provides updates and supplements to information found in various guides and analytical articles touching upon a broad range of topics related to the Canadian economy.

      Release date: 2020-06-10

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-26-0003
      Description:

      Statistics Canada Data Strategy (SCDS) provides a course of action for managing and leveraging the agency’s data assets to ensure their optimal use and value while maintaining public trust. As Statistics Canada is the nation’s trusted provider of high-quality data and information to support evidence-based policy and decision making, the SCDS also naturally includes the agency’s plan for providing support and data expertise to other government organizations (federal, provincial and territorial), non-governmental organizations, the private sector, academia, and other national and international communities).

      The SCDS provides a roadmap for how Statistics Canada will continue to govern and manage its valuable data assets as part of its modernization agenda and in alignment with and response to other federal government strategies and initiatives. These federal strategies include the Data Strategy for the Federal Public Service, Canada’s 2018-2020 National Action Plan on Open Government, and the Treasury Board Secretariat Digital Operations Strategic Plan: 2018-2022.

      Release date: 2020-04-30

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 34-26-0002
      Description:

      As of reference year 2018, the Annual Capital and Repair Expenditures Survey (CAPEX) has added additional content allowing to produce estimates of capital and repair expenditures on infrastructure assets. In addition to the existing content, the new questionnaire asks for a breakdown of expenditures by function (or purpose) as well as the source of funding of capital expenditures from government grants and subsidies.

      This product will decribe the sources and methods used to produce capital and repair expenditure estimates specific to infrastructure assets by function.

      Release date: 2020-04-01

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2020001
      Description:

      This note provides the definition of a first-time homebuyer concept used in the 2018 Canadian Housing Survey (CHS). It also includes the methodology used to identify first-time homebuyers and provides sensitivity analysis under alternative methodologies.

      Release date: 2020-01-15

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-633-X2019005
      Description:

      The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) is a comprehensive source of data that plays a key role in the understanding of the economic behaviour of immigrants. It is the only annual Canadian dataset that allows users to study the characteristics of immigrants to Canada at the time of admission and their economic outcomes and regional (inter-provincial) mobility over a time span of more than 35 years. The IMDB includes Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) administrative records which contain exhaustive information about immigrants who were admitted to Canada since 1952. It also includes data about non-permanent residents who have been issued temporary resident permits since 1980. This report will discuss the IMDB data sources, concepts and variables, record linkage, data processing, dissemination, data evaluation and quality indicators, comparability with other immigration datasets, and the analyses possible with the IMDB.

      Release date: 2019-12-16

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-539-X
      Description:

      This document brings together guidelines and checklists on many issues that need to be considered in the pursuit of quality objectives in the execution of statistical activities. Its focus is on how to assure quality through effective and appropriate design or redesign of a statistical project or program from inception through to data evaluation, dissemination and documentation. These guidelines draw on the collective knowledge and experience of many Statistics Canada employees. It is expected that Quality Guidelines will be useful to staff engaged in the planning and design of surveys and other statistical projects, as well as to those who evaluate and analyze the outputs of these projects.

      Release date: 2019-12-04

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 98-303-X
      Description:

      The Coverage Technical Report will present the error included in census data that results from either persons being missed (not enumerated) or from persons being enumerated more than once by the 2016 Census. The population coverage error is one of the most important types of errors because it affects not only the accuracy of population counts, but also the accuracy of all the census data results describing the characteristics of the population universe.

      Release date: 2019-11-13

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 99-011-X
      Description:

      This topic presents data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, estimates using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal ancestry, (3) Registered or Treaty Indian status and (4) Membership in a First Nation or Indian band. Data from the 2011 National Household Survey are available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including 'on reserve' census subdivisions and Inuit communities of Inuit Nunangat as well as other geographic areas such as the national (Canada), provincial and territorial levels.

      Analytical products

      The analytical document provides analysis on the key findings and trends in the data, and is complimented with the short articles found in NHS in Brief and the NHS Focus on Geography Series.

      Data products

      The NHS Profile is one data product that provides a statistical overview of user selected geographic areas based on several detailed variables and/or groups of variables. Other data products include data tables which represent a series of cross tabulations ranging in complexity and are available for various levels of geography.

      Release date: 2019-10-29

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-621-M2018105
      Description:

      Statistics Canada needs to respond to the legalization of cannabis for non-medical use by measuring various aspects of the introduction of cannabis in the Canadian economy and society. An important part of measuring the economy and society is using statistical classifications. It is common practice with classifications that they are updated and revised as new industries, products, occupations and educational programs are introduced into the Canadian economy and society. This paper describes the changes to the various statistical classifications used by Statistics Canada in order to measure the introduction of legal non-medical cannabis.

      Release date: 2019-07-24

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-514-G
      Description:

      The Guide to the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions, and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, processing, and data quality. The guide covers both components of the survey: the job vacancy component, which is quarterly, and the wage component, which is annual.

      Release date: 2019-06-18
    Date modified: