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    All (48) (0 to 10 of 48 results)

    • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
      Description:

      The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

      Release date: 2020-10-22

    • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100055
      Description:

      As a result of the widespread measures taken to contain the spread of COVID-19, the Canadian economy has dramatically declined over the past few months and has significantly impacted the ability of businesses in Canada to operate.

      As Canada's economy moved towards a recovery, Statistics Canada ran the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions to better understand the ongoing effects on businesses as the economy begins to reopen.

      Release date: 2020-07-16

    • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020009
      Description:

      The main objective of this paper is to determine whether the immigration status of the owner of a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) affects the likelihood of a company implementing an innovation. This paper uses data from a survey of Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in 2011, 2014 and 2017, and asks whether immigrant-owned SMEs were more likely to innovate during the three years prior to the survey than those owned by Canadian-born individuals.

      Release date: 2020-06-09

    • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100018
      Description:

      The Canadian economy changed dramatically in March 2020 as a result of COVID-19 and the situation has had a profound impact on the ability of businesses in Canada to operate. In order to better understand the impact of COVID-19 on businesses, employers and employees, communities and our economy, Statistics Canada and the Canadian Chamber of Commerce collaborated to launch the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions. While the majority of businesses in Canada have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, it appears that small businesses have been hit particularly hard by this crisis.

      Release date: 2020-05-11

    • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018404
      Description:

      Using data from the 2011 and 2014 Survey on Financing and Growth of Small and Medium Enterprises, this paper examines access to financing by immigrant business owners. It documents the main financing sources of immigrant-owned and Canadian-owned small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

      Release date: 2018-06-18

    • Journals and periodicals: 11F0027M
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      The Economic Analysis Research Paper Series provides the circulation of research conducted by the staff of National Accounts and Analytical Studies, visiting fellows and academic associates. The research paper series is meant to stimulate discussion on a range of topics including the impact of the new economy; productivity issues; firm profitability; technology usage; the effect of financing on firm growth; depreciation functions; the use of satellite accounts; savings rates; leasing; firm dynamics; hedonic estimations; diversification patterns; investment patterns; the differences in the performance of small and large, or domestic and multinational firms; and purchasing power parity estimates. Readers of the series are encouraged to contact the authors with comments, criticisms and suggestions.

      The primary distribution medium for the papers is the Internet. These papers can be downloaded from the Internet at www.statcan.gc.ca for free. Papers in the series are distributed to Statistics Canada Regional Offices and provincial statistical focal points.

      All papers in the Economic Analysis Series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a government statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

      The papers in the series often include results derived from multivariate analysis or other statistical techniques. It should be recognized that the results of these analyses are subject to uncertainty in the reported estimates.

      The level of uncertainty will depend on several factors: the nature of the functional form used in the multivariate analysis; the type of econometric technique employed; the appropriateness of the statistical assumptions embedded in the model or technique; the comprehensiveness of the variables included in the analysis; and the accuracy of the data that are utilized. The peer group review process is meant to ensure that the papers in the series have followed accepted standards to minimize problems in each of these areas.

      Release date: 2015-07-24

    • Notices and consultations: 11-017-X
      Description:

      Statistics Canada's Newsletter for Small and Medium-sized Businesses offers information to the business community about Statistics Canada's data and services. The newsletter also offers links to data releases of the Census and National Household Survey, videos, tutorials, media advisories, learning sessions and presentations.

      Release date: 2014-11-20

    • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014088
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This paper compares the relative importance of small and large firms in the business sectors of Canada and the United States from 2002 to 2008 using estimates of the contribution of small and large firms to the gross domestic product (GDP) of each country. It then makes use of estimates of labour input for comparison purposes. In this paper, small firms are defined as those with fewer than 500 employees and large firms as those with 500 or more employees.

      Release date: 2014-01-08

    • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014033
      Description:

      This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

      Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

      The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

      Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

      Release date: 2014-01-08

    • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013087
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      The topic of firm size and performance continues to spark the interest of researchers and policy-makers. Small and medium-sized enterprises receive much of the attention, as they have the potential to grow significantly. However, compared with their larger counterparts, these firms are more likely to fail and are therefore riskier.

      Is risk important in explaining differences in profitability across firm size classes? This study uses a longitudinal firm-level dataset to examine determinants of profitability by firm size, with an emphasis on risk, or the volatility in rates of return. It builds on previous research that found firms with 10 to 20 employees tend to be the most profitable.

      Release date: 2013-12-19
    Data (7)

    Data (7) ((7 results))

    • Table: 63-224-X
      Description:

      The handbook is designed to be a comprehensive source of socio-economic statistics for all those who study the Canadian consumer market - market researchers, strategists, product planners and sales leaders. The broad range of data is equally relevant to consumer and to business-to-business marketing. The data present profiles of key industries, including the small business sector, as well as of consumers in all the provinces and the 45 major cities across Canada. International trade data, households, families and selected economic indicators, to name a few, provide useful information for businesses seeking to expand or develop new product lines. As well as including data from the 2001 Census and a wide range of other surveys, the 2006 edition also incorporates a number of features designed to make it more user-friendly. Features include a user's guide, annotated charts to reveal salient trends, data sources, and references to CANSIM.

      Release date: 2008-04-08

    • Table: 50-002-X20040047024
      Description:

      To provide data users with a more complete picture of the activies associated with the Couriers and Local Messengers industry.

      Release date: 2004-07-14

    • Table: 50-002-X20030037023
      Description:

      To provide data users with a more complete picture of the activies associated with the Couriers and Local Messengers industry.

      Release date: 2003-12-23

    • Table: 50-002-X20030027022
      Description:

      To provide data users with a more complete picture of the activies associated with the Couriers and Local Messengers industry.

      Release date: 2003-12-03

    • Table: 50-002-X20010027021
      Description:

      To provide data users with a more complete picture of the activies associated with the Couriers and Local Messengers industry.

      Release date: 2001-09-18

    • Table: 50-002-X20000037020
      Description:

      To provide data users with a more complete picture of the activies associated with the Couriers and Local Messengers industry.

      Release date: 2000-09-14

    • Table: 50-002-X19990047019
      Description:

      To provide data users with a more complete picture of the activies associated with the Couriers and Local Messengers industry.

      Release date: 1999-07-27
    Analysis (39)

    Analysis (39) (0 to 10 of 39 results)

    • Journals and periodicals: 11-632-X
      Description:

      The newsletter offers information aimed at three main groups, businesses (small to medium), communities and ethno-cultural groups/communities. Articles and outreach materials will assist their understanding of national and local data from the many relevant sources found on the Statistics Canada website.

      Release date: 2020-10-22

    • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100055
      Description:

      As a result of the widespread measures taken to contain the spread of COVID-19, the Canadian economy has dramatically declined over the past few months and has significantly impacted the ability of businesses in Canada to operate.

      As Canada's economy moved towards a recovery, Statistics Canada ran the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions to better understand the ongoing effects on businesses as the economy begins to reopen.

      Release date: 2020-07-16

    • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020009
      Description:

      The main objective of this paper is to determine whether the immigration status of the owner of a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) affects the likelihood of a company implementing an innovation. This paper uses data from a survey of Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in 2011, 2014 and 2017, and asks whether immigrant-owned SMEs were more likely to innovate during the three years prior to the survey than those owned by Canadian-born individuals.

      Release date: 2020-06-09

    • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100018
      Description:

      The Canadian economy changed dramatically in March 2020 as a result of COVID-19 and the situation has had a profound impact on the ability of businesses in Canada to operate. In order to better understand the impact of COVID-19 on businesses, employers and employees, communities and our economy, Statistics Canada and the Canadian Chamber of Commerce collaborated to launch the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions. While the majority of businesses in Canada have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, it appears that small businesses have been hit particularly hard by this crisis.

      Release date: 2020-05-11

    • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018404
      Description:

      Using data from the 2011 and 2014 Survey on Financing and Growth of Small and Medium Enterprises, this paper examines access to financing by immigrant business owners. It documents the main financing sources of immigrant-owned and Canadian-owned small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

      Release date: 2018-06-18

    • Journals and periodicals: 11F0027M
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      The Economic Analysis Research Paper Series provides the circulation of research conducted by the staff of National Accounts and Analytical Studies, visiting fellows and academic associates. The research paper series is meant to stimulate discussion on a range of topics including the impact of the new economy; productivity issues; firm profitability; technology usage; the effect of financing on firm growth; depreciation functions; the use of satellite accounts; savings rates; leasing; firm dynamics; hedonic estimations; diversification patterns; investment patterns; the differences in the performance of small and large, or domestic and multinational firms; and purchasing power parity estimates. Readers of the series are encouraged to contact the authors with comments, criticisms and suggestions.

      The primary distribution medium for the papers is the Internet. These papers can be downloaded from the Internet at www.statcan.gc.ca for free. Papers in the series are distributed to Statistics Canada Regional Offices and provincial statistical focal points.

      All papers in the Economic Analysis Series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a government statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

      The papers in the series often include results derived from multivariate analysis or other statistical techniques. It should be recognized that the results of these analyses are subject to uncertainty in the reported estimates.

      The level of uncertainty will depend on several factors: the nature of the functional form used in the multivariate analysis; the type of econometric technique employed; the appropriateness of the statistical assumptions embedded in the model or technique; the comprehensiveness of the variables included in the analysis; and the accuracy of the data that are utilized. The peer group review process is meant to ensure that the papers in the series have followed accepted standards to minimize problems in each of these areas.

      Release date: 2015-07-24

    • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014088
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This paper compares the relative importance of small and large firms in the business sectors of Canada and the United States from 2002 to 2008 using estimates of the contribution of small and large firms to the gross domestic product (GDP) of each country. It then makes use of estimates of labour input for comparison purposes. In this paper, small firms are defined as those with fewer than 500 employees and large firms as those with 500 or more employees.

      Release date: 2014-01-08

    • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014033
      Description:

      This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

      Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

      The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

      Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

      Release date: 2014-01-08

    • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013087
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      The topic of firm size and performance continues to spark the interest of researchers and policy-makers. Small and medium-sized enterprises receive much of the attention, as they have the potential to grow significantly. However, compared with their larger counterparts, these firms are more likely to fail and are therefore riskier.

      Is risk important in explaining differences in profitability across firm size classes? This study uses a longitudinal firm-level dataset to examine determinants of profitability by firm size, with an emphasis on risk, or the volatility in rates of return. It builds on previous research that found firms with 10 to 20 employees tend to be the most profitable.

      Release date: 2013-12-19

    • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2013032
      Description:

      This paper examines differences in labour productivity across small, medium- and large-sized enterprises in Canada.

      In 2008, the level of labour productivity, as measured by nominal gross domestic product per hour worked, in large businesses was greater than that for medium-sized and small businesses. This gap between large businesses relative to small and medium-sized businesses narrowed slightly during the post-2000 period. The paper also examines the impact of changes in industrial structure on labour productivity.

      Release date: 2013-08-26
    Reference (2)

    Reference (2) ((2 results))

    • Notices and consultations: 11-017-X
      Description:

      Statistics Canada's Newsletter for Small and Medium-sized Businesses offers information to the business community about Statistics Canada's data and services. The newsletter also offers links to data releases of the Census and National Household Survey, videos, tutorials, media advisories, learning sessions and presentations.

      Release date: 2014-11-20

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-580-X
      Description:

      The adult education and training sector is as complex as it is dynamic. In order to describe all its facets, Statistics Canada surveys many different populations. Given the number of data sources and their conceptual and methodological differences, it is sometimes very difficult for researchers and decision makers to obtain required information or data. This guide is a tool that has been developed to assist them. It provides a summary description of all Statistics Canada surveys related to adult education and training. From a selected variable, it allows the identification of surveys that can provide information. It also indicates relevant publications and how to obtain additional information.

      Release date: 1997-03-12
    Date modified: