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  • 36-23-0001
    Description:

    The input-output (IO) models are generally used to simulate the economic impacts of an expenditure on a given basket of goods and services or the output of one or several industries. The simulation results from a "shock" to an IO model will show the direct, indirect and induced impacts on GDP, which industries benefit the most, the number of jobs created, estimates of indirect taxes and subsidies generated, etc. For more details, ask us for the Guide to using the input-output simulation model, available free of charge upon request. At various times, clients have requested the use of IO price, energy, tax and market models. Given their availability, arrangements can be made to use these models on request. The national IO model was not released in 2015 or 2016.

    Release date: 2019-05-01

  • 36-23-0002
    Description:

    The input-output (IO) models are generally used to simulate the economic impacts of an expenditure on a given basket of goods and services or the output of one or several industries. The simulation results from a "shock" to an IO model will show the direct, indirect and induced impacts on GDP, which industries benefit the most, the number of jobs created, estimates of indirect taxes and subsidies generated, etc. For more details, ask us for the Guide to using the input-output simulation model, available free of charge upon request. At various times, clients have requested the use of IO price, energy, tax and market models. Given their availability, arrangements can be made to use these models on request. The interprovincial IO model was not released in 2015 or 2016.

    Release date: 2019-05-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15F0004X
    Description:

    The input-output (IO) models are generally used to simulate the economic impacts of an expenditure on a given basket of goods and services or the output of one or several industries. The simulation results from a "shock" to an IO model will show the direct, indirect and induced impacts on GDP, which industries benefit the most, the number of jobs created, estimates of indirect taxes and subsidies generated, etc. For more details, ask us for the Guide to using the input-output simulation model, available free of charge upon request.

    At various times, clients have requested the use of IO price, energy, tax and market models. Given their availability, arrangements can be made to use these models on request.

    The national IO model was not released in 2015 or 2016.

    Release date: 2019-04-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15F0009X
    Description:

    The input-output (IO) models are generally used to simulate the economic impacts of an expenditure on a given basket of goods and services or the output of one or several industries. The simulation results from a "shock" to an IO model will show the direct, indirect and induced impacts on GDP, which industries benefit the most, the number of jobs created, estimates of indirect taxes and subsidies generated, etc. For more details, ask us for the Guide to using the input-output simulation model, available free of charge upon request.

    At various times, clients have requested the use of IO price, energy, tax and market models. Given their availability, arrangements can be made to use these models on request.

    The interprovincial IO model was not released in 2015 or 2016.

    Release date: 2019-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019005
    Description:

    This note describes methodological changes made to the Market Basket Measure (MBM) in Calendar year 2019. These revisions mainly affect MBM estimates for 2008 and 2009, but they also affect the overall interpretation of the trends in the MBM over the 2000s.

    Release date: 2019-02-26

  • Table: 98-400-X2016147
    Description:

    This table presents individual Market Basket Measure (MBM) low-income status, age and sex for the population in private households of Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Table: 98-400-X2016148
    Description:

    This table presents individual Market Basket Measure (MBM) low-income status and economic family characteristics of persons for the population in private households of Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2016002
    Description:

    Statistics Canada currently measures low-income using three low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs), and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). This publication provides a description of the methods used to arrive at each of these thresholds. It also explains how low-income status and various low-income statistics are determined. Tables presenting thresholds and low-income statistics are available on CANSIM.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2015002
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Employment and Social Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    This update presents revised LIMs for 2006 to 2011 resulting from the reweighting of SLID data. This reweighting makes it possible to compare results from CIS to earlier years.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2015001
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Employment and Social Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2015-07-08
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019005
    Description:

    This note describes methodological changes made to the Market Basket Measure (MBM) in Calendar year 2019. These revisions mainly affect MBM estimates for 2008 and 2009, but they also affect the overall interpretation of the trends in the MBM over the 2000s.

    Release date: 2019-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2016002
    Description:

    Statistics Canada currently measures low-income using three low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs), and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). This publication provides a description of the methods used to arrive at each of these thresholds. It also explains how low-income status and various low-income statistics are determined. Tables presenting thresholds and low-income statistics are available on CANSIM.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2015002
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Employment and Social Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    This update presents revised LIMs for 2006 to 2011 resulting from the reweighting of SLID data. This reweighting makes it possible to compare results from CIS to earlier years.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2015001
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Employment and Social Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2015-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2014003
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Employment and Social Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2014-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2013002
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Human Resources and Skill Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2013-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2012002
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Human Resources and Skill Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2012-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2012001
    Description:

    This study examines low income in Canada over a 34-year period from 1976 to 2009 with a multi-line, multi-index approach using data from the Survey of Consumer Finance (1976 to 1995) and Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (1996 to 2009). Three different low income lines are used: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs); the Low Income Measure (LIM) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). In addition, three indexes are used to measure the incidence, depth and severity of low income in the study.

    We first examine the evolution of low-income at the national level. This is followed by an investigation of the low income experiences of children, seniors, lone-parents, unattached non-elderly individuals, recent immigrants, off-reserve aboriginals and persons with activity limitations. Next, we compare low incomes across the ten provinces as well as seven Census Metropolitan Areas (CMA). Finally, we study low income mobility in Canada during the 1993-to-2009 period.

    Release date: 2012-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2011003
    Description:

    Existing studies on Canadian poverty (or low-income) dynamics are mainly based on 1990s data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database or the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). These studies typically rely on a single low-income threshold.

    Our work extends the existing studies beyond 1999 by using SLID data from Panel 3 (1999 to 2004) and Panel 4 (2002 to 2007). We consider all three low-income thresholds established by federal departments: Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off (LICO) and low-income measure (LIM), and the market basket measure (MBM) of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.

    Release date: 2011-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2011002
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Human Resources and Skill Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2011-06-15
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15F0004X
    Description:

    The input-output (IO) models are generally used to simulate the economic impacts of an expenditure on a given basket of goods and services or the output of one or several industries. The simulation results from a "shock" to an IO model will show the direct, indirect and induced impacts on GDP, which industries benefit the most, the number of jobs created, estimates of indirect taxes and subsidies generated, etc. For more details, ask us for the Guide to using the input-output simulation model, available free of charge upon request.

    At various times, clients have requested the use of IO price, energy, tax and market models. Given their availability, arrangements can be made to use these models on request.

    The national IO model was not released in 2015 or 2016.

    Release date: 2019-04-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15F0009X
    Description:

    The input-output (IO) models are generally used to simulate the economic impacts of an expenditure on a given basket of goods and services or the output of one or several industries. The simulation results from a "shock" to an IO model will show the direct, indirect and induced impacts on GDP, which industries benefit the most, the number of jobs created, estimates of indirect taxes and subsidies generated, etc. For more details, ask us for the Guide to using the input-output simulation model, available free of charge upon request.

    At various times, clients have requested the use of IO price, energy, tax and market models. Given their availability, arrangements can be made to use these models on request.

    The interprovincial IO model was not released in 2015 or 2016.

    Release date: 2019-04-04
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