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All (92) (0 to 10 of 92 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-20-00032024003
    Description: Are you feeling like it's a little bit harder to bring home the bacon... from the grocery store? The latest data indicate that food prices have mostly stabilized... but why does it feel like the cost of feeding your family is still going up? Today, we're talking food inflation with StatCan's resident smart cookie Taylor Mitchell.
    Release date: 2024-05-08

  • Table: 62-013-X
    Description: These indexes are calculated to establish and adjust the Post Living Allowance (PLA) paid to Canadian government employees serving outside of Canada. They are comparative measurements that numerically express the difference between the retail prices of a representative basket of goods and services at a foreign location with prices for a similar basket of goods and services in Ottawa.

    Three separate reports are provided to reflect the specific terms and conditions of service for these personnel. A description of each report is provided below.

    Foreign Service Directives Post Indexes

    These indexes are calculated for personnel serving under the terms and conditions of the Foreign Service Directives (FSDs). They reflect circumstances for personnel who may have access to certain goods and services that are free of duties or taxes or to sources of supply that are not available to the general public. Where employees do not have (either directly or indirectly) duty-free purchasing privileges, departmental administrators must consult with Statistics Canada to calculate an additional index to reflect the specific circumstances in effect at that post.

    Global Affairs Canada (GAC) Post Indexes (TAH)

    These indexes are calculated for cooperants and advisors serving under the Technical Assistance Handbook (TAH), whose terms and conditions are governed by Global Affairs Canada (GAC).

    Canadian Forces Post Indexes

    These indexes are calculated for Canadian Forces members serving under either the terms and conditions of the Military Foreign Service Instructions (MFSIs) or the Foreign Service Directives (FSDs). They reflect circumstances for personnel who may have access to sources of supply that are not available to the general public. These personnel also may have access to certain goods and services that are free of duties or taxes or may be provided with supplies or allowances by the Department of National Defence or the United Nations. The indexes in this listing are not appropriate for use by non-military personnel.

    Release date: 2024-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202400400004
    Description: This article provides an integrated summary of recent changes in output, consumer prices, employment, and household finances. It highlights changes in the economic data during the second half of 2023 and into the winter months. The article also examines how economic conditions have changed as borrowing costs have risen.
    Release date: 2024-04-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202400100005
    Description: As interest rates rise to curb inflation, so too do risks associated with higher levels of debt. While much has been written about elevated levels of household debt, less attention has been paid to the growth in Canadian corporate debt and its implications for the business and financial sectors. This paper provides an overview of how Canadian corporate borrowing has evolved and what this may mean for risks going forward.
    Release date: 2024-01-24

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2020015
    Description:

    This interactive calculator allows users to create a personal inflation time-series. Users enter dollar amounts in the common expense categories to produce a personalized inflation rate, which will more closely approximate an individual’s inflation experience than the average measure of inflation - the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

    The Personal Inflation Calculator displays your personal index, 12-month percentage change, or 1-month percentage change in personal inflation alongside the official CPI in an interactive chart, allowing the user to compare inflation estimates over time in selected geographies.

    This web-based application is updated monthly, as the data for the latest CPI reference month become available.

    Release date: 2023-11-30

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2023062
    Description: This infographic details the food supply chain by focusing on the price movements for wheat-based food products in 2023 and the costs to move food products from producers to consumers. Since March 2022, some costs along the supply chain have declined while others remained elevated. Prices for bread, pasta and cereal at the grocery store continued to increase in 2023 but at a slower pace compared with 2022.
    Release date: 2023-11-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-631-X2023007
    Description: This presentation provides a summary of recent trends relating to economic growth, inflation and affordability. It highlights examples of current economic pressures and potential challenges.
    Release date: 2023-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2023004
    Description: This paper looks at how profitability has evolved for key Canadian industries from 2017 to 2022. A specific focus is given to the post-lockdown period between the second quarters of 2021 and 2022, during which year-over-year inflation exceeded the Bank of Canada’s inflation-control target range ceiling of 3%. In addition to industry-wide trends, energy and food sectors are analyzed given their day-to-day relevance for Canadians.
    Release date: 2023-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300600002
    Description: As a small open economy, Canada’s price level is vulnerable to external factors that affect import prices such as geopolitical risks, exchange rate variations, global supply constraints, etc. As a large portion of consumption and inputs used in production are imported, rise in import prices will push up consumption prices and production costs as well, and hence may lead to higher inflation. This article aims at examining to what extent the current high inflation in Canada is impacted by the rise in import prices, and then examining what drive the rise in import prices.
    Release date: 2023-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300600004
    Description: In the past two years, Canada has experienced inflation rates that have not been seen in the past two decades. The rise of markups, i.e., price over marginal cost, can be one of the potential drivers or amplifiers of inflation. This study uses firm-level data to estimate markups in Canada's pre- and post-COVID.
    Release date: 2023-06-28
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 62-013-X
    Description: These indexes are calculated to establish and adjust the Post Living Allowance (PLA) paid to Canadian government employees serving outside of Canada. They are comparative measurements that numerically express the difference between the retail prices of a representative basket of goods and services at a foreign location with prices for a similar basket of goods and services in Ottawa.

    Three separate reports are provided to reflect the specific terms and conditions of service for these personnel. A description of each report is provided below.

    Foreign Service Directives Post Indexes

    These indexes are calculated for personnel serving under the terms and conditions of the Foreign Service Directives (FSDs). They reflect circumstances for personnel who may have access to certain goods and services that are free of duties or taxes or to sources of supply that are not available to the general public. Where employees do not have (either directly or indirectly) duty-free purchasing privileges, departmental administrators must consult with Statistics Canada to calculate an additional index to reflect the specific circumstances in effect at that post.

    Global Affairs Canada (GAC) Post Indexes (TAH)

    These indexes are calculated for cooperants and advisors serving under the Technical Assistance Handbook (TAH), whose terms and conditions are governed by Global Affairs Canada (GAC).

    Canadian Forces Post Indexes

    These indexes are calculated for Canadian Forces members serving under either the terms and conditions of the Military Foreign Service Instructions (MFSIs) or the Foreign Service Directives (FSDs). They reflect circumstances for personnel who may have access to sources of supply that are not available to the general public. These personnel also may have access to certain goods and services that are free of duties or taxes or may be provided with supplies or allowances by the Department of National Defence or the United Nations. The indexes in this listing are not appropriate for use by non-military personnel.

    Release date: 2024-05-03

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2020015
    Description:

    This interactive calculator allows users to create a personal inflation time-series. Users enter dollar amounts in the common expense categories to produce a personalized inflation rate, which will more closely approximate an individual’s inflation experience than the average measure of inflation - the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

    The Personal Inflation Calculator displays your personal index, 12-month percentage change, or 1-month percentage change in personal inflation alongside the official CPI in an interactive chart, allowing the user to compare inflation estimates over time in selected geographies.

    This web-based application is updated monthly, as the data for the latest CPI reference month become available.

    Release date: 2023-11-30

  • Table: 62-001-X20040016915
    Description:

    This article provides annual average index movements in components of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the year 2003.

    Release date: 2004-02-20
Analysis (85)

Analysis (85) (0 to 10 of 85 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-20-00032024003
    Description: Are you feeling like it's a little bit harder to bring home the bacon... from the grocery store? The latest data indicate that food prices have mostly stabilized... but why does it feel like the cost of feeding your family is still going up? Today, we're talking food inflation with StatCan's resident smart cookie Taylor Mitchell.
    Release date: 2024-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202400400004
    Description: This article provides an integrated summary of recent changes in output, consumer prices, employment, and household finances. It highlights changes in the economic data during the second half of 2023 and into the winter months. The article also examines how economic conditions have changed as borrowing costs have risen.
    Release date: 2024-04-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202400100005
    Description: As interest rates rise to curb inflation, so too do risks associated with higher levels of debt. While much has been written about elevated levels of household debt, less attention has been paid to the growth in Canadian corporate debt and its implications for the business and financial sectors. This paper provides an overview of how Canadian corporate borrowing has evolved and what this may mean for risks going forward.
    Release date: 2024-01-24

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2023062
    Description: This infographic details the food supply chain by focusing on the price movements for wheat-based food products in 2023 and the costs to move food products from producers to consumers. Since March 2022, some costs along the supply chain have declined while others remained elevated. Prices for bread, pasta and cereal at the grocery store continued to increase in 2023 but at a slower pace compared with 2022.
    Release date: 2023-11-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-631-X2023007
    Description: This presentation provides a summary of recent trends relating to economic growth, inflation and affordability. It highlights examples of current economic pressures and potential challenges.
    Release date: 2023-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2023004
    Description: This paper looks at how profitability has evolved for key Canadian industries from 2017 to 2022. A specific focus is given to the post-lockdown period between the second quarters of 2021 and 2022, during which year-over-year inflation exceeded the Bank of Canada’s inflation-control target range ceiling of 3%. In addition to industry-wide trends, energy and food sectors are analyzed given their day-to-day relevance for Canadians.
    Release date: 2023-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300600002
    Description: As a small open economy, Canada’s price level is vulnerable to external factors that affect import prices such as geopolitical risks, exchange rate variations, global supply constraints, etc. As a large portion of consumption and inputs used in production are imported, rise in import prices will push up consumption prices and production costs as well, and hence may lead to higher inflation. This article aims at examining to what extent the current high inflation in Canada is impacted by the rise in import prices, and then examining what drive the rise in import prices.
    Release date: 2023-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300600004
    Description: In the past two years, Canada has experienced inflation rates that have not been seen in the past two decades. The rise of markups, i.e., price over marginal cost, can be one of the potential drivers or amplifiers of inflation. This study uses firm-level data to estimate markups in Canada's pre- and post-COVID.
    Release date: 2023-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300600005
    Description: The recent period of high inflation has prompted a number of studies examining its causes and consequences. Of particular interest if whether “greedflation”, the situation where businesses are taking the opportunity in a high inflationary environment to increase their prices above their underlying costs of production in order to garner higher profits. This article sheds light on this by investigating how labour costs (primarily wages and salaries), and non-labour costs (primarily returns to capital) are evolving relative to inflation.
    Release date: 2023-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2023003
    Description: This paper describes the composition of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) basket and the changes introduced with the 2023 basket update, based on 2022 expenditure weights.
    Release date: 2023-06-20
Reference (4)

Reference (4) ((4 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005005
    Description:

    This discussion paper reviews the previous research into the subject of presenting historical time series and comparisons in constant dollars for the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), and its predecessor the Family Expenditure Survey (FAMEX). It examines two principal methods of converting spending data into constant dollars. The purpose of this discussion paper is to show interested parties how the two methods differ in complexity of implementation and interpretation.

    Release date: 2005-07-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62-560-X
    Description:

    This teacher's kit helps students understand how the Consumer Price Index (CPI) reflects price changes for the goods and services they buy.

    The Custom Inflation Simulator is a Web-based resource that demonstrates how the many consumer goods and services in the 'basket' are used to calculate the CPI, and how consumption patterns differ from person to person. Using the simulator, students can also see the effect of individual price increases on overall inflation, in other words how each item in the basket is 'weighted' to reflect its importance in Canadians' consumption patterns.

    Release date: 2004-10-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 21-601-M2004072
    Description:

    The Farm Product Price Index (FPPI) is a monthly series that measures the changes in prices that farmers receive for the agriculture commodities they produce and sell.

    The FPPI was discontinued in March 1995; it was revived in April 2001 owing to continued demand for an index of prices received by farmers.

    Release date: 2004-09-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2001008
    Description:

    Under any degree of inflation, high or low, the values of changes in inventories (VPC) is generally different when it is calculated at the quarterly interval and the four quarters are aggregated into a year compared with its calculation done at the yearly interval. It is argued in this paper that it is an inherent problem as one of the basic axioms of annual accounts is violated, namely, the assumption of price homogeneity over an accounting period.

    Release date: 2001-03-16
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