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All (24) (0 to 10 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-598-X2017001
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2015 looks at various factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through previous surveys on apprentices, the last one completed in 2007. The 2015 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Employment and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    A sample of over 28,000 respondents – who had either completed or discontinued an apprenticeship program between 2011 and 2013 – was collected.

    The Canada Overview Report presents a profile of apprentices and their experiences in apprenticeship programs in Canada, including technical training and on-the-job training; challenges and difficulties faced; awareness and use of financial support programs; the certification process, including Red Seal; labour market outcomes and job satisfaction; interprovincial mobility; and attitudes about skilled trades.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-598-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. The survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) and Statistics Canada. It is hoped that the findings will contribute to the ongoing dialogue by governments, industry and unions to ensure that the apprenticeship systems in Canada continue to respond to the demands of the 21st Century.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012345
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) to compare hourly wage differences observed between apprentices who complete their programs and apprentices who discontinue their programs. The primary objective is to estimate the magnitude of the wage difference between these groups while taking into account a broad range of characteristics. Furthermore, wage comparisons are refined further by disaggregating apprentices into four mutually exclusive groups, defined on the basis of program completion and certification.

    Release date: 2012-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011333
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The number of registered apprentices in Canada more than doubled between 1995 and 2007, yet successful completion of apprenticeship programs increased by only about one-third as much. Uncovering the factors related to low completion rates is a necessary first step to ensuring that today's skilled labour is replaced in the future. This study utilizes the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) to investigate the completion behaviour of individuals enrolled in apprenticeship programs. These behaviours include continuing, discontinuing (or quitting), and completing programs. The NAS contains detailed demographic information regarding respondents' backgrounds and the characteristics of apprenticeship programs. The results show that program completion is positively related to a variety of demographic characteristics, including being married and having completed at least a high school education prior to beginning an apprenticeship. Males and females have similar completion probabilities. Completion is negatively related to time in the apprenticeship program (beyond the normal program length) and the number of employers during training. Type of technical training and having a journeyperson always present enhance the probability of completion. The regional unemployment rate has little effect on whether an individual completes an apprenticeship program or not. There are also large provincial and trade group differences.

    This is a revised version of an earlier paper circulated under the same title (Laporte and Mueller 2010). We thank the Canadian Labour Market and Skills Researcher Network (CLSRN) and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) for supporting this research. We would also like to thank an anonymous reviewer, Grant Schellenberg, and Pamela White for useful comments as well as participants at the January 2010 HRSDC-CLSRN Apprenticeship Workshop in Vancouver and many colleagues at Statistics Canada and HRSDC.

    Release date: 2011-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000511367
    Description:

    This article draws a profile of trade qualifiers in 2007, using data from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). A trade qualifier is a person who has not completed an apprenticeship program but has acquired enough practical work experience to write the examination to obtain the certificate of qualification (or certificate of competence) issued by the provincial or territorial authorities responsible for certifying trades workers. Trade qualifiers accounted for 43% of certificates of qualification issued in the apprenticeable trades in 2007.

    Release date: 2010-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000211253
    Description:

    This article summarizes the results of a recent Statistics Canada study that examined completion and discontinuation rates of registered apprentices over a period of 11 years - from 1995 to 2005 - using a longitudinal cohort created from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). The article examines the relationship between the duration of an apprenticeship program and completion and discontinuation rates, which are discussed in relation to the nominal duration of programs, the median time needed for completion, as well as time spent in the program for discontinuers.

    Release date: 2010-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010080
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report looks at completion and discontinuation rates of registered apprentices using two longitudinal cohorts created from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). These cohorts comprised registered apprentices who first enrolled in an apprenticeship program in 1994 or in 1995.

    The purpose of the study is to provide measures of completion of apprenticeship programs and information on the learning paths of the apprentices tracked over an 11-year period. It follows two other reports published in 2005 and in 2008, which examined the same issues. In those studies, results for three provinces - New Brunswick, Ontario and Alberta - were analyzed for the cohorts of new apprenticeship enrolees in the years 1992 and 1993. The current report includes three new provinces: Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia.

    Completion and discontinuation are discussed in relation to the age of the apprentices, major trade groups, nominal duration of programs, time spent in the program for completers and discontinuers and whether or not the trade was covered by the Red Seal Interprovincial Standards Program. Detailed data tables provide information for individual trades in each of the six provinces.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900611127
    Description:

    This article draws on the latest data from Statistics Canada's Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) to examine trends in apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2007 period. Information is provided for trends in the total number of registrations and completions, by major trade group, and by sex and age. References to total registrations include the still-registered apprentices from the previous year plus newly-registered apprentices from the current year.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900210895
    Description:

    This article uses data from the National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 to compare the profiles of apprentices who completed their programs between 2002 and 2004 and who had moved to Alberta by 2007 and those who stayed in their province of enrolment. It also compares a number of variables describing the working conditions of apprenticeship completers who migrated to Alberta for work and those who were working in the province where they received their training (other than Alberta).

    Release date: 2009-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811013217
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Education and training continue to be important in the labour market. To many, this implies a university degree. But society also needs tradesworkers to perform many vital tasks -- build houses, run the electrical lines, fix plumbing and maintain cars to name just a few. Many businesses are reporting difficulties finding skilled tradespersons and governments are responding with policies to stimulate employment in the trades. Employment trends in selected trades over the past 20 years are examined, along with the socio-economic traits of the workers and the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2008-12-18
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 97F0024X2001008
    Description:

    These data tables present 2001 Census highlights on "various indicators of work".

    The tables were available on the official day of release for each of the census topics at various levels of geography. They present information highlights through key indicators, such as 2001 counts and percentage distribution. The tables also allow users to perform simple rank and sort functions.

    Release date: 2003-02-11
Analysis (23)

Analysis (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-598-X2017001
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2015 looks at various factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through previous surveys on apprentices, the last one completed in 2007. The 2015 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Employment and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    A sample of over 28,000 respondents – who had either completed or discontinued an apprenticeship program between 2011 and 2013 – was collected.

    The Canada Overview Report presents a profile of apprentices and their experiences in apprenticeship programs in Canada, including technical training and on-the-job training; challenges and difficulties faced; awareness and use of financial support programs; the certification process, including Red Seal; labour market outcomes and job satisfaction; interprovincial mobility; and attitudes about skilled trades.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-598-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. The survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) and Statistics Canada. It is hoped that the findings will contribute to the ongoing dialogue by governments, industry and unions to ensure that the apprenticeship systems in Canada continue to respond to the demands of the 21st Century.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012345
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) to compare hourly wage differences observed between apprentices who complete their programs and apprentices who discontinue their programs. The primary objective is to estimate the magnitude of the wage difference between these groups while taking into account a broad range of characteristics. Furthermore, wage comparisons are refined further by disaggregating apprentices into four mutually exclusive groups, defined on the basis of program completion and certification.

    Release date: 2012-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011333
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The number of registered apprentices in Canada more than doubled between 1995 and 2007, yet successful completion of apprenticeship programs increased by only about one-third as much. Uncovering the factors related to low completion rates is a necessary first step to ensuring that today's skilled labour is replaced in the future. This study utilizes the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) to investigate the completion behaviour of individuals enrolled in apprenticeship programs. These behaviours include continuing, discontinuing (or quitting), and completing programs. The NAS contains detailed demographic information regarding respondents' backgrounds and the characteristics of apprenticeship programs. The results show that program completion is positively related to a variety of demographic characteristics, including being married and having completed at least a high school education prior to beginning an apprenticeship. Males and females have similar completion probabilities. Completion is negatively related to time in the apprenticeship program (beyond the normal program length) and the number of employers during training. Type of technical training and having a journeyperson always present enhance the probability of completion. The regional unemployment rate has little effect on whether an individual completes an apprenticeship program or not. There are also large provincial and trade group differences.

    This is a revised version of an earlier paper circulated under the same title (Laporte and Mueller 2010). We thank the Canadian Labour Market and Skills Researcher Network (CLSRN) and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) for supporting this research. We would also like to thank an anonymous reviewer, Grant Schellenberg, and Pamela White for useful comments as well as participants at the January 2010 HRSDC-CLSRN Apprenticeship Workshop in Vancouver and many colleagues at Statistics Canada and HRSDC.

    Release date: 2011-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000511367
    Description:

    This article draws a profile of trade qualifiers in 2007, using data from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). A trade qualifier is a person who has not completed an apprenticeship program but has acquired enough practical work experience to write the examination to obtain the certificate of qualification (or certificate of competence) issued by the provincial or territorial authorities responsible for certifying trades workers. Trade qualifiers accounted for 43% of certificates of qualification issued in the apprenticeable trades in 2007.

    Release date: 2010-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000211253
    Description:

    This article summarizes the results of a recent Statistics Canada study that examined completion and discontinuation rates of registered apprentices over a period of 11 years - from 1995 to 2005 - using a longitudinal cohort created from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). The article examines the relationship between the duration of an apprenticeship program and completion and discontinuation rates, which are discussed in relation to the nominal duration of programs, the median time needed for completion, as well as time spent in the program for discontinuers.

    Release date: 2010-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010080
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report looks at completion and discontinuation rates of registered apprentices using two longitudinal cohorts created from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). These cohorts comprised registered apprentices who first enrolled in an apprenticeship program in 1994 or in 1995.

    The purpose of the study is to provide measures of completion of apprenticeship programs and information on the learning paths of the apprentices tracked over an 11-year period. It follows two other reports published in 2005 and in 2008, which examined the same issues. In those studies, results for three provinces - New Brunswick, Ontario and Alberta - were analyzed for the cohorts of new apprenticeship enrolees in the years 1992 and 1993. The current report includes three new provinces: Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia.

    Completion and discontinuation are discussed in relation to the age of the apprentices, major trade groups, nominal duration of programs, time spent in the program for completers and discontinuers and whether or not the trade was covered by the Red Seal Interprovincial Standards Program. Detailed data tables provide information for individual trades in each of the six provinces.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900611127
    Description:

    This article draws on the latest data from Statistics Canada's Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) to examine trends in apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2007 period. Information is provided for trends in the total number of registrations and completions, by major trade group, and by sex and age. References to total registrations include the still-registered apprentices from the previous year plus newly-registered apprentices from the current year.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900210895
    Description:

    This article uses data from the National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 to compare the profiles of apprentices who completed their programs between 2002 and 2004 and who had moved to Alberta by 2007 and those who stayed in their province of enrolment. It also compares a number of variables describing the working conditions of apprenticeship completers who migrated to Alberta for work and those who were working in the province where they received their training (other than Alberta).

    Release date: 2009-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811013217
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Education and training continue to be important in the labour market. To many, this implies a university degree. But society also needs tradesworkers to perform many vital tasks -- build houses, run the electrical lines, fix plumbing and maintain cars to name just a few. Many businesses are reporting difficulties finding skilled tradespersons and governments are responding with policies to stimulate employment in the trades. Employment trends in selected trades over the past 20 years are examined, along with the socio-economic traits of the workers and the characteristics of their jobs.

    Release date: 2008-12-18
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