Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (15)

All (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100063
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has already resulted in a considerable slowdown in economic activity in Canada. Young people have been hit particularly hard. This article presents estimates of the cumulative earnings losses in the first five years after graduation that this year's graduating class could experience, depending on the depth of the economic downturn. Specifically, five scenarios for this year's youth unemployment rate are examined.

    Release date: 2020-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020012
    Description:

    In this Economic Insights article, the potential earnings losses experienced by this year’s class of high school and postsecondary graduates as a result of COVID-19 are simulated. These graduates may face very challenging conditions as they enter the labour market, which could have long-term ramifications for their earnings prospects. Consequently, earnings losses are simulated up to five years after graduation, based on various scenarios of this year’s youth unemployment rate.

    Release date: 2020-07-28

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100029
    Description:

    The economic lockdown to stop the spread of COVID-19 has led to steep declines in employment and hours worked for many Canadians. For workers in essential services, in jobs that can be done with proper physical distancing measures or in jobs that can be done from home, the likelihood of experiencing a work interruption during the pandemic is lower than for other workers. This article assesses how the feasibility of working from home varies across Canadian families. It also considers the implications of these differences for family earnings inequality.

    Release date: 2020-06-08

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100026
    Description:

    Physical distancing measures to stop the spread of COVID-19 have resulted in a large number of Canadians working from home, many for the first time. This sudden transition in how the economy is operating raises questions about how many jobs can reasonably be performed from home.

    Release date: 2020-05-28

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100010
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has led to massive work interruptions in Canada and several other countries since mid-March 2020. The resulting economic lockdown has raised concerns about the ability of Canadian families to meet their financial obligations and essential needs. This article focuses on families who rely primarily on earnings—wages and salaries and self-employment income—to maintain their living standards.

    Release date: 2020-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019018
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of public sector salary disclosure laws on university faculty salaries in Canada. These laws, which give the public access to the salaries of individual faculty members if they exceed specified thresholds, were introduced in different provinces at different points in time. One of the most persistent and salient features of labour markets around the world is that women earn less than men. A hypothesis recently gaining traction among academic researchers and policy makers is that the gender earnings gap persists in part because it is hidden. There have also been calls in the private sector for more transparency on pay discrepancies between male and female workers. This paper provides new evidence on the causal effect of pay transparency laws on salaries.

    Release date: 2019-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019001
    Description:

    What is the effect of having an employer-sponsored pension plan (EPP) on financial performance in non-workplace investments? This paper offers new insight into this unresolved empirical issue, using administrative data on over 345,000 taxfilers from Canada.

    Release date: 2019-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018410
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which older Canadian taxfilers, aged 60 to 69, respond to predictable changes in marginal tax rates created by the tax and transfer system by exhibiting sorting behaviour in taxable income.

    Using administrative tax data for the years from 2001 to 2012, the analysis assesses how individuals respond to changes in marginal tax rates created at the lower bounds of the second, third and fourth federal tax brackets; the lower bounds of the second and third provincial and territorial tax brackets; and the thresholds at which the Old Age Security and Employment Insurance benefits start being clawed back through recovery taxes.

    Release date: 2018-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018012
    Description:

    This study investigates the extent to which income tax reassessments and delayed tax filing affect the reliability of Canadian administrative tax datasets used for economic analysis. The study is based on individual income tax records from the T1 Personal Master File and Historical Personal Master File for selected years from 1990 to 2010. These datasets contain tax records for approximately 100% of initial and all income tax filers, who submitted returns to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) before specific processing cut-off dates.

    Release date: 2018-01-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017400
    Description:

    Despite a large literature estimating the effects of income taxation on the labour decisions of young and middle-aged workers, little is known about the extent to which older workers respond to changes in their income taxes. This paper explores this unresolved empirical issue, using longitudinal administrative data on more than one million individuals from Canada and exploiting a recent tax reform in the empirical identification strategy that explicitly targeted older couples. The findings offer new insight into the “black box” of intra-household labour supply and inform the optimal designs of income tax and retirement income systems.

    Release date: 2017-11-23
Stats in brief (4)

Stats in brief (4) ((4 results))

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100063
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has already resulted in a considerable slowdown in economic activity in Canada. Young people have been hit particularly hard. This article presents estimates of the cumulative earnings losses in the first five years after graduation that this year's graduating class could experience, depending on the depth of the economic downturn. Specifically, five scenarios for this year's youth unemployment rate are examined.

    Release date: 2020-07-28

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100029
    Description:

    The economic lockdown to stop the spread of COVID-19 has led to steep declines in employment and hours worked for many Canadians. For workers in essential services, in jobs that can be done with proper physical distancing measures or in jobs that can be done from home, the likelihood of experiencing a work interruption during the pandemic is lower than for other workers. This article assesses how the feasibility of working from home varies across Canadian families. It also considers the implications of these differences for family earnings inequality.

    Release date: 2020-06-08

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100026
    Description:

    Physical distancing measures to stop the spread of COVID-19 have resulted in a large number of Canadians working from home, many for the first time. This sudden transition in how the economy is operating raises questions about how many jobs can reasonably be performed from home.

    Release date: 2020-05-28

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100010
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has led to massive work interruptions in Canada and several other countries since mid-March 2020. The resulting economic lockdown has raised concerns about the ability of Canadian families to meet their financial obligations and essential needs. This article focuses on families who rely primarily on earnings—wages and salaries and self-employment income—to maintain their living standards.

    Release date: 2020-05-06
Articles and reports (11)

Articles and reports (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020012
    Description:

    In this Economic Insights article, the potential earnings losses experienced by this year’s class of high school and postsecondary graduates as a result of COVID-19 are simulated. These graduates may face very challenging conditions as they enter the labour market, which could have long-term ramifications for their earnings prospects. Consequently, earnings losses are simulated up to five years after graduation, based on various scenarios of this year’s youth unemployment rate.

    Release date: 2020-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019018
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of public sector salary disclosure laws on university faculty salaries in Canada. These laws, which give the public access to the salaries of individual faculty members if they exceed specified thresholds, were introduced in different provinces at different points in time. One of the most persistent and salient features of labour markets around the world is that women earn less than men. A hypothesis recently gaining traction among academic researchers and policy makers is that the gender earnings gap persists in part because it is hidden. There have also been calls in the private sector for more transparency on pay discrepancies between male and female workers. This paper provides new evidence on the causal effect of pay transparency laws on salaries.

    Release date: 2019-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019001
    Description:

    What is the effect of having an employer-sponsored pension plan (EPP) on financial performance in non-workplace investments? This paper offers new insight into this unresolved empirical issue, using administrative data on over 345,000 taxfilers from Canada.

    Release date: 2019-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018410
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which older Canadian taxfilers, aged 60 to 69, respond to predictable changes in marginal tax rates created by the tax and transfer system by exhibiting sorting behaviour in taxable income.

    Using administrative tax data for the years from 2001 to 2012, the analysis assesses how individuals respond to changes in marginal tax rates created at the lower bounds of the second, third and fourth federal tax brackets; the lower bounds of the second and third provincial and territorial tax brackets; and the thresholds at which the Old Age Security and Employment Insurance benefits start being clawed back through recovery taxes.

    Release date: 2018-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018012
    Description:

    This study investigates the extent to which income tax reassessments and delayed tax filing affect the reliability of Canadian administrative tax datasets used for economic analysis. The study is based on individual income tax records from the T1 Personal Master File and Historical Personal Master File for selected years from 1990 to 2010. These datasets contain tax records for approximately 100% of initial and all income tax filers, who submitted returns to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) before specific processing cut-off dates.

    Release date: 2018-01-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017400
    Description:

    Despite a large literature estimating the effects of income taxation on the labour decisions of young and middle-aged workers, little is known about the extent to which older workers respond to changes in their income taxes. This paper explores this unresolved empirical issue, using longitudinal administrative data on more than one million individuals from Canada and exploiting a recent tax reform in the empirical identification strategy that explicitly targeted older couples. The findings offer new insight into the “black box” of intra-household labour supply and inform the optimal designs of income tax and retirement income systems.

    Release date: 2017-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017010
    Description:

    Using an employer–employee matched dataset of administrative tax records on most Canadian firms and the full populations of their workers, this paper documents relationships between firm size, industry, and the typical ages of firms’ workforces. In particular, the paper considers both differences in levels for the calendar years 2003 to 2010 inclusive, as well as changes in the age composition of firms’ workforces over this time as observed in a longitudinal analysis.

    Release date: 2017-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017391
    Description:

    This paper assesses the extent to which education affects how Canadians save and accumulate wealth for retirement. The paper makes three contributions. First, a descriptive analysis is presented of differences in savings and home values across individuals based on their levels of educational attainment. To this end, new datasets that link survey respondents from the 1991 and 2006 censuses of Canada to their administrative tax records are used. These data provide a unique opportunity to jointly observe education, savings, home values, and a plethora of other factors of relevance. Second, the causal effect of high school completion on savings rates in tax-preferred accounts is estimated, exploiting compulsory schooling reforms in the identification. Third, building on a recent study by Messacar (2015), education is also found to affect how individuals re-optimize their savings rates in response to an automatic change in pension wealth accumulation. The implications of this study’s findings for the “nudge paradigm” in behavioural economics are discussed.

    Release date: 2017-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016064
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents an overview of recent trends in registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) use among Canadian taxfilers aged 25 to 54, from 2000 to 2013. The analysis centres on differences in RRSP contribution and withdrawal behaviour across income groups, and around the time that the tax free savings account (TFSA) was introduced.

    Release date: 2017-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015371
    Description:

    This paper investigates whether registered pension plans (RPPs) help households prepare financially for retirement or simply substitute for other forms of private saving. This issue is addressed using a panel of 1.8 million Canadian households, from 1991 to 2010, which appear in the Longitudinal Administrative Databank. The analysis controls for correlations in savings across accounts due to unobserved tastes for saving by exploiting the fact that employer contribution rates increase discontinuously on earnings above the average industrial wage, a unique feature of occupational pensions in Canada, the effect being estimated in a Regression Kink Design.

    Release date: 2015-12-21
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