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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-633-X2021002
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) is a comprehensive source of data that plays a key role in the understanding of the economic behaviour of immigrants. It is the only annual Canadian dataset that allows users to study the characteristics of immigrants to Canada at the time of admission and their economic outcomes and regional (inter-provincial) mobility over a time span of more than 35 years. The IMDB includes Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) administrative records which contain exhaustive information about immigrants who were admitted to Canada since 1952. It also includes data about non-permanent residents who have been issued temporary resident permits since 1980. This report will discuss the IMDB data sources, concepts and variables, record linkage, data processing, dissemination, data evaluation and quality indicators, comparability with other immigration datasets, and the analyses possible with the IMDB.

    Release date: 2021-02-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-633-X2019005
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) is a comprehensive source of data that plays a key role in the understanding of the economic behaviour of immigrants. It is the only annual Canadian dataset that allows users to study the characteristics of immigrants to Canada at the time of admission and their economic outcomes and regional (inter-provincial) mobility over a time span of more than 35 years. The IMDB includes Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) administrative records which contain exhaustive information about immigrants who were admitted to Canada since 1952. It also includes data about non-permanent residents who have been issued temporary resident permits since 1980. This report will discuss the IMDB data sources, concepts and variables, record linkage, data processing, dissemination, data evaluation and quality indicators, comparability with other immigration datasets, and the analyses possible with the IMDB.

    The IMDB was released in stages. The sections 2.2 and 7 of this report were revised to take the updates into account.

    Release date: 2020-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020002
    Description:

    Administrative data sets have become increasingly popular sources of information to study mobility across generations. However, the inclusion of parent-child pairs depends on the primary purpose for which the data was collected. In the case of tax records, both parents and children must have worked and filed their taxes, and the children's labour market entry must have happened before they left the parental home. This paper documents selection in samples of parent-child pairs constructed from personal income tax records from Canada, and discusses implications for intergenerational research. It takes advantage of the fact that Statistics Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) includes both survey and administrative data to inform the nature and severity of the resulting sample selection. Results show that respondents who were successfully linked to their parents are more educated, and are more likely to have grown up in better educated, nuclear families. However, correcting for sample selection suggests that there is no bias in unadjusted estimates.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020003
    Description:

    This study investigates the suitability of Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) for research on intergenerational income mobility. The LISA combines survey data, collected biennially since 2012, and the personal income tax records of both respondents and their past and present family members. In comparison, existing work on intergenerational mobility in Canada has often used the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), a purely administrative dataset based on the universe of tax filers. The IID's size has allowed researchers to describe the experience of mobility of narrowly defined geographic units and cohorts. However, its potential to investigate the mechanisms underlying these patterns is limited, given the small set of variables it informs. As such, the LISA is a promising candidate to further our understanding of the drivers of mobility. This study reproduces the analysis from four key papers that have documented the intergenerational transmission of income in Canada using the IID. Despite having a much smaller sample size and a different approach to the establishment of parent-child links, it finds that the LISA produces results that are consistent with the existing literature. This study also explores the sensitivity of rank-rank estimates to the choice of different specification and present results that will guide the methodological choices to be made by users of the LISA intergenerational family files in combination with LISA variables from the survey data.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200003
    Description:

    This article provides a description of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs), a population-based linked datasets of the household population at the time of census collection. The CanCHEC datasets are rich national data resources that can be used to measure and examine health inequalities across socioeconomic and ethnocultural dimensions for different periods and locations. These datasets can also be used to examine the effects of exposure to environmental factors on human health.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2019006
    Description:

    This video describes a new health surveillance program at Statistics Canada: The Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs). The video describes the attributes of and the datasets included in the CanCHECs, how the CanCHECs can be used, and their strengths and limitations. Recent examples of research projects based on the CanCHECs are presented along with information about how to apply for access to these data.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201935022104
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019025
    Description:

    This study identifies gig workers based on characteristics of their work arrangements and how these are reported in tax data. It introduces a definition of gig work specific to the way work arrangements are reported in the Canadian tax system and estimates the size of the gig economy in Canada using administrative data. The share of gig workers among all workers rose from 5.5% in 2005 to 8.2% in 2016. Some of this increase coincided with the introduction and proliferation of online platforms. The analysis highlights gender differences in the trends and characteristics of gig workers. By linking administrative data to 2016 Census microdata, this study also examines educational and occupational differences in the prevalence of gig workers.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201917920478
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019007
    Description:

    Not having a Social Insurance Number (SIN) and not filing taxes may represent challenges to access government programs and supports such as the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) and the Canada Learning Bond (CLB). Limited data availability has prevented a full assessment of the extent of these access challenges. This study attempts to address this knowledge gap by analyzing overall differences in SIN possession and tax-filing uptake by family income, levels of parental education, family type and Indigenous identity of the child and age of children using the 2016 Census data augmented with tax-filing and Social Insurance Number possession indicator flags.

    Release date: 2019-06-21
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  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020002
    Description:

    Administrative data sets have become increasingly popular sources of information to study mobility across generations. However, the inclusion of parent-child pairs depends on the primary purpose for which the data was collected. In the case of tax records, both parents and children must have worked and filed their taxes, and the children's labour market entry must have happened before they left the parental home. This paper documents selection in samples of parent-child pairs constructed from personal income tax records from Canada, and discusses implications for intergenerational research. It takes advantage of the fact that Statistics Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) includes both survey and administrative data to inform the nature and severity of the resulting sample selection. Results show that respondents who were successfully linked to their parents are more educated, and are more likely to have grown up in better educated, nuclear families. However, correcting for sample selection suggests that there is no bias in unadjusted estimates.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020003
    Description:

    This study investigates the suitability of Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) for research on intergenerational income mobility. The LISA combines survey data, collected biennially since 2012, and the personal income tax records of both respondents and their past and present family members. In comparison, existing work on intergenerational mobility in Canada has often used the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), a purely administrative dataset based on the universe of tax filers. The IID's size has allowed researchers to describe the experience of mobility of narrowly defined geographic units and cohorts. However, its potential to investigate the mechanisms underlying these patterns is limited, given the small set of variables it informs. As such, the LISA is a promising candidate to further our understanding of the drivers of mobility. This study reproduces the analysis from four key papers that have documented the intergenerational transmission of income in Canada using the IID. Despite having a much smaller sample size and a different approach to the establishment of parent-child links, it finds that the LISA produces results that are consistent with the existing literature. This study also explores the sensitivity of rank-rank estimates to the choice of different specification and present results that will guide the methodological choices to be made by users of the LISA intergenerational family files in combination with LISA variables from the survey data.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200003
    Description:

    This article provides a description of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs), a population-based linked datasets of the household population at the time of census collection. The CanCHEC datasets are rich national data resources that can be used to measure and examine health inequalities across socioeconomic and ethnocultural dimensions for different periods and locations. These datasets can also be used to examine the effects of exposure to environmental factors on human health.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2019006
    Description:

    This video describes a new health surveillance program at Statistics Canada: The Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs). The video describes the attributes of and the datasets included in the CanCHECs, how the CanCHECs can be used, and their strengths and limitations. Recent examples of research projects based on the CanCHECs are presented along with information about how to apply for access to these data.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201935022104
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019025
    Description:

    This study identifies gig workers based on characteristics of their work arrangements and how these are reported in tax data. It introduces a definition of gig work specific to the way work arrangements are reported in the Canadian tax system and estimates the size of the gig economy in Canada using administrative data. The share of gig workers among all workers rose from 5.5% in 2005 to 8.2% in 2016. Some of this increase coincided with the introduction and proliferation of online platforms. The analysis highlights gender differences in the trends and characteristics of gig workers. By linking administrative data to 2016 Census microdata, this study also examines educational and occupational differences in the prevalence of gig workers.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201917920478
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019007
    Description:

    Not having a Social Insurance Number (SIN) and not filing taxes may represent challenges to access government programs and supports such as the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) and the Canada Learning Bond (CLB). Limited data availability has prevented a full assessment of the extent of these access challenges. This study attempts to address this knowledge gap by analyzing overall differences in SIN possession and tax-filing uptake by family income, levels of parental education, family type and Indigenous identity of the child and age of children using the 2016 Census data augmented with tax-filing and Social Insurance Number possession indicator flags.

    Release date: 2019-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201900100005
    Description:

    The last global financial crisis revealed some important data gaps in countries’ statistics to properly assess the build-up of risk and the interconnectedness in financial markets. These gaps have led to the development of a series of initiatives at the international level with clear deliverables to enhance the quality of the information produced by countries in the area of financial investment statistics, including statistics on securities. The initiative undertaken at Statistics Canada to enhance securities statistics has produced many benefits with important expansions in terms of additional characteristics of instruments issued and held by Canadians, additional sector details as well as increased frequency and timeliness.

    Release date: 2019-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2018001
    Description:

    This study looks at changes introduced in 2018 to the methodology used for the census family low income measure, based on the T1 Family File (T1FF; tax filer data). By making these changes, the methodology becomes better aligned with other data sources at Statistics Canada, such as the Census of Population and the Canadian Income Survey. To account for changes in the methodology, new T1FF standard tables on the census family low income measure (after-tax income), going back to 2004 data, are introduced.

    Release date: 2018-04-05
Reference (16)

Reference (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-633-X2021002
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) is a comprehensive source of data that plays a key role in the understanding of the economic behaviour of immigrants. It is the only annual Canadian dataset that allows users to study the characteristics of immigrants to Canada at the time of admission and their economic outcomes and regional (inter-provincial) mobility over a time span of more than 35 years. The IMDB includes Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) administrative records which contain exhaustive information about immigrants who were admitted to Canada since 1952. It also includes data about non-permanent residents who have been issued temporary resident permits since 1980. This report will discuss the IMDB data sources, concepts and variables, record linkage, data processing, dissemination, data evaluation and quality indicators, comparability with other immigration datasets, and the analyses possible with the IMDB.

    Release date: 2021-02-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-633-X2019005
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) is a comprehensive source of data that plays a key role in the understanding of the economic behaviour of immigrants. It is the only annual Canadian dataset that allows users to study the characteristics of immigrants to Canada at the time of admission and their economic outcomes and regional (inter-provincial) mobility over a time span of more than 35 years. The IMDB includes Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) administrative records which contain exhaustive information about immigrants who were admitted to Canada since 1952. It also includes data about non-permanent residents who have been issued temporary resident permits since 1980. This report will discuss the IMDB data sources, concepts and variables, record linkage, data processing, dissemination, data evaluation and quality indicators, comparability with other immigration datasets, and the analyses possible with the IMDB.

    The IMDB was released in stages. The sections 2.2 and 7 of this report were revised to take the updates into account.

    Release date: 2020-07-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-633-X2018019
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) is a comprehensive source of data that plays a key role in the understanding of the economic behaviour of immigrants. It is the only annual Canadian dataset that allows users to study the characteristics of immigrants to Canada at the time of admission and their economic outcomes and regional (inter-provincial) mobility over a time span of more than 30 years. The IMDB combines administrative files on immigrant admissions and non-permanent resident permits from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) with tax files from the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA). Information is available for immigrant taxfilers admitted since 1980. Tax records for 1982 and subsequent years are available for immigrant taxfilers. This report will discuss the IMDB data sources, concepts and variables, record linkage, data processing, dissemination, data evaluation and quality indicators, comparability with other immigration datasets, and the analyses possible with the IMDB.

    Release date: 2018-12-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-633-X2018011
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) is a comprehensive source of data that plays a key role in the understanding of the economic behaviour of immigrants. It is the only annual Canadian dataset that allows users to study the characteristics of immigrants to Canada at the time of admission and their economic outcomes and regional (inter-provincial) mobility over a time span of more than 30 years. The IMDB combines administrative files on immigrant admissions and non-permanent resident permits from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) with tax files from the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA). Information is available for immigrant taxfilers admitted since 1980. Tax records for 1982 and subsequent years are available for immigrant taxfilers.

    This report will discuss the IMDB data sources, concepts and variables, record linkage, data processing, dissemination, data evaluation and quality indicators, comparability with other immigration datasets, and the analyses possible with the IMDB.

    Release date: 2018-01-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014716
    Description:

    Administrative data, depending on its source and original purpose, can be considered a more reliable source of information than survey-collected data. It does not require a respondent to be present and understand question wording, and it is not limited by the respondent’s ability to recall events retrospectively. This paper compares selected survey data, such as demographic variables, from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) to various administrative sources for which LISA has linkage agreements in place. The agreement between data sources, and some factors that might affect it, are analyzed for various aspects of the survey.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014717
    Description:

    Files with linked data from the Statistics Canada, Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) and tax data can be used to examine the trajectories of students who pursue postsecondary education (PSE) programs and their post-schooling labour market outcomes. On one hand, administrative data on students linked longitudinally can provide aggregate information on student pathways during postsecondary studies such as persistence rates, graduation rates, mobility, etc. On the other hand, the tax data could supplement the PSIS data to provide information on employment outcomes such as average and median earnings or earnings progress by employment sector (industry), field of study, education level and/or other demographic information, year over year after graduation. Two longitudinal pilot studies have been done using administrative data on postsecondary students of Maritimes institutions which have been longitudinally linked and linked to Statistics Canada Ttx data (the T1 Family File) for relevant years. This article first focuses on the quality of information in the administrative data and the methodology used to conduct these longitudinal studies and derive indicators. Second, it will focus on some limitations when using administrative data, rather than a survey, to define some concepts.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014741
    Description:

    Statistics Canada’s mandate includes producing statistical data to shed light on current business issues. The linking of business records is an important aspect of the development, production, evaluation and analysis of these statistical data. As record linkage can intrude on one’s privacy, Statistics Canada uses it only when the public good is clear and outweighs the intrusion. Record linkage is experiencing a revival triggered by a greater use of administrative data in many statistical programs. There are many challenges to business record linkage. For example, many administrative files not have common identifiers, information is recorded is in non-standardized formats, information contains typographical errors, administrative data files are usually large in size, and finally the evaluation of multiple record pairings makes absolute comparison impractical and sometimes impossible. Due to the importance and challenges associated with record linkage, Statistics Canada has been developing a record linkage standard to help users optimize their business record linkage process. For example, this process includes building on a record linkage blocking strategy that reduces the amount of record-pairs to compare and match, making use of Statistics Canada’s internal software to conduct deterministic and probabilistic matching, and creating standard business name and address fields on Statistics Canada’s Business Register. This article gives an overview of the business record linkage methodology and looks at various economic projects which use record linkage at Statistics Canada, these include projects in the National Accounts, International Trade, Agriculture and the Business Register.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014747
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) combines the Immigrant Landing File (ILF) with annual tax files. This record linkage is performed using a tax filer database. The ILF includes all immigrants who have landed in Canada since 1980. In looking to enhance the IMDB, the possibility of adding temporary residents (TR) and immigrants who landed between 1952 and 1979 (PRE80) was studied. Adding this information would give a more complete picture of the immigrant population living in Canada. To integrate the TR and PRE80 files into the IMDB, record linkages between these two files and the tax filer database, were performed. This exercise was challenging in part due to the presence of duplicates in the files and conflicting links between the different record linkages.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014749
    Description:

    As part of the Tourism Statistics Program redesign, Statistics Canada is developing the National Travel Survey (NTS) to collect travel information from Canadian travellers. This new survey will replace the Travel Survey of Residents of Canada and the Canadian resident component of the International Travel Survey. The NTS will take advantage of Statistics Canada’s common sampling frames and common processing tools while maximizing the use of administrative data. This paper discusses the potential uses of administrative data such as Passport Canada files, Canada Border Service Agency files and Canada Revenue Agency files, to increase the efficiency of the NTS sample design.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-005-M2015001
    Description:

    Using the experimental Workplace Survey conducted in 2011, this technical document summarizes the main results and evaluates the quality of the data.

    Release date: 2015-04-28
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