Multifactor productivity

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All (31) (0 to 10 of 31 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019013
    Description:

    The need to measure both the desirable outputs (goods and services) and the undesirable outputs (emissions of greenhouse gases [GHGs] and criteria air contaminants [CACs]) from economic activity is becoming increasingly important as economic performance and environmental performance become ever more intertwined. Standard measures of multifactor productivity (MFP) growth provide insights into rising standards of living and the performance of economies, but they may be misleading if only desirable outputs are considered. This study presents estimates of environmentally adjusted multifactor productivity (EAMFP) growth using a new comprehensive database. This database contains information on GHG and CAC emissions, as well as on the production activities of Canadian manufacturers.

    Release date: 2019-05-08

  • Table: 36-10-0211-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 383-0026)
    Geography: Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Multifactor productivity and related variables in the aggregate business sector and major sub-sectors, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), provinces.
    Release date: 2019-04-12

  • Table: 36-10-0208-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 383-0021)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Multifactor productivity, value-added, capital input and labour input in the aggregate business sector and major sub-sectors, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), annual (index, 2002=100).
    Release date: 2019-03-08

  • Table: 36-10-0217-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 383-0032)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Multifactor productivity, gross output, value-added, capital, labour and intermediate inputs at a detailed industry level, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), annual (index, 2002=100).
    Release date: 2019-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015097
    Description:

    Canada’s aggregate productivity performance has closely tracked changes in Canada’s trading environment. To gain a better understanding of the link, the Economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada has conducted a set of studies that investigate whether and how changes in the trading environment, brought about by trade liberalization policies and exchange-rate movements, contributed to productivity growth. The firm-level analysis provides insights into the productivity dynamics that arise from within-industry growth and restructuring as resources are shifted from declining to growing industries. The paper provides an overview of the key Canadian empirical findings over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2015-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014037
    Description:

    This paper presents estimates of effective multifactor productivity (MFP) growth for Canada, the United States, Australia, Japan and selected European Union (EU) countries, based on the EU KLEMS productivity database and the World Input-Output Tables. Effective MFP growth captures the impact of the productivity gains in upstream industries on the productivity growth and international competitiveness of domestic industries, thereby providing an appropriate measure of productivity growth and international competitiveness in the production of final demand products such as consumption, investment and export products. A substantial portion of MFP growth, especially for small, open economies such as Canada’s, is attributable to gains in the production of intermediate inputs in foreign countries. Productivity growth tends to be higher in investment and export products than for the production of consumption products. Technical progress and productivity growth in foreign countries have made a larger contribution to production growth in investment and export products than in consumption products. The analysis provides empirical evidence consistent with the hypothesis that effective MFP growth is a more informative relevant indicator of international competitiveness than is standard MFP growth.

    Release date: 2014-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014035
    Description:

    This paper highlights revisions to multifactor productivity (MFP) growth and related variables in the business sector and in individual industries, which resulted from the historical revision of the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) released October 1, 2012, revisions to the labour productivity accounts released October 12, 2012, and changes in the estimation of capital input that were made in order to improve its consistency in industry MFP growth estimates.

    The multifactor productivity program produces indexes of MFP and related measures (output, capital input, labour input and intermediate inputs) for the business sector, broad economic sub-sectors, and their constituent industries. The MFP program divides growth in labour productivity into its key determinants: capital intensity (changes in capital per hour worked), investment in human capital, and MFP, which includes technological change, organizational innovation and economies of scale.

    Release date: 2014-07-08

  • Table: 36-10-0309-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 383-0022)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: This table contains 1647 series, with data for years 1961 - 2008 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 items: Canada ...), Multifactor productivity and related variables (27 items: Labour productivity based on gross output; Labour productivity based on value-added; Multifactor productivity based on value-added; Multifactor productivity based on gross output ...), North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (61 items: Agriculture; forestry; fishing and hunting; Crop and animal production; Fishing; hunting and trapping; Forestry and logging ...).
    Release date: 2014-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines two aspects of productivity growth in Canada's broadcasting and telecommunications industry. The first is the extent to which aggregate MFP growth in the sector came from scale economies as opposed to technical progress. The second is the extent to which aggregate labour productivity growth and MFP growth came from within-firm growth, and from the effect of reallocation due to firm entry and exit and within incumbents' the dynamic forces associated with competitive change.

    Release date: 2014-02-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013031
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports the impact of correcting for variations in capacity utilization on multifactor productivity growth in Canadian business industries. It is based on a recently released Statistics Canada research paper. Results show that multifactor productivity growth is procyclical for almost all business industries, and that such pro-cyclicality largely reflects variations in capacity utilization in some industries, especially in manufacturing and mining.

    Release date: 2013-10-04
Data (6)

Data (6) ((6 results))

  • Table: 36-10-0211-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 383-0026)
    Geography: Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Multifactor productivity and related variables in the aggregate business sector and major sub-sectors, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), provinces.
    Release date: 2019-04-12

  • Table: 36-10-0208-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 383-0021)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Multifactor productivity, value-added, capital input and labour input in the aggregate business sector and major sub-sectors, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), annual (index, 2002=100).
    Release date: 2019-03-08

  • Table: 36-10-0217-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 383-0032)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Multifactor productivity, gross output, value-added, capital, labour and intermediate inputs at a detailed industry level, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), annual (index, 2002=100).
    Release date: 2019-03-08

  • Table: 36-10-0309-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 383-0022)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: This table contains 1647 series, with data for years 1961 - 2008 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 items: Canada ...), Multifactor productivity and related variables (27 items: Labour productivity based on gross output; Labour productivity based on value-added; Multifactor productivity based on value-added; Multifactor productivity based on gross output ...), North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (61 items: Agriculture; forestry; fishing and hunting; Crop and animal production; Fishing; hunting and trapping; Forestry and logging ...).
    Release date: 2014-04-23

  • Table: 36-10-0310-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 383-0023)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: This table contains 1404 series, with data for years 1961 - 1997 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years), and was last released on 2009-01-22. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 items: Canada ...), Multifactor productivity and related variables (27 items: Multifactor productivity based on gross output; Multifactor productivity based on value-added; Labour productivity based on value-added; Labour productivity based on gross output ...), Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) (52 items: Agricultural and related services industries; Mining (including milling); quarrying and oil well industries; Fishing and trapping industries; Logging and forestry industries ...).
    Release date: 2009-01-22

  • Table: 15-003-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data is an electronic publication that contains a series of tables on productivity growth and related variables for the business sector and its 51 major sub-sectors based on the North American Industry Classification System. These tables allow users to have a broader perspective on Canadian economic performance. They complement the information available on CANSIM which offers more detail, particularly at the industry level.

    Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) are responsible for producing, analyzing and disseminating Statistics Canada's official data on productivity and for producing and integrating data on employment, hours worked and capital services consistent with the Canadian System of National Accounts. To this end, the CPA comprise three programs. The quarterly program provides current estimates on labour productivity and labour costs at the aggregate level for 15 industry groups. The annual national program provides yearly estimates on labour productivity, multifactor productivity and several indicators of sources of growth and competitiveness as they apply to the major sectors of the economy and to the industry level. Lastly, the annual provincial program, as an integral part of the Provincial Economic Accounts, provides estimates on employment, hours worked, labour productivity and labour costs at the industry level for each province and territory.

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data covers four series of statistical tables:

    Table 1: Output, labour compensation, capital cost and cost of intermediate inputs in current dollars

    Table 2: Productivity and related measures

    Table 3: Productivity and related measures for the business sector, Canada and United States

    Table 4: Productivity and related measures for the manufacturing sector, Canada and United States

    Productivity measures the efficiency with which inputs (labour and capital in particular) are utilized in production. Productivity measures can be applied to a single input, such as labour productivity (output per hour worked), as well as to multifactor productivity (output per unit of combined labour and capital inputs). Statistics Canada produces these two main measures of productivity, but other productivity ratios can also be measured (e.g., output per unit of capital services).

    Release date: 2007-12-06
Analysis (22)

Analysis (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019013
    Description:

    The need to measure both the desirable outputs (goods and services) and the undesirable outputs (emissions of greenhouse gases [GHGs] and criteria air contaminants [CACs]) from economic activity is becoming increasingly important as economic performance and environmental performance become ever more intertwined. Standard measures of multifactor productivity (MFP) growth provide insights into rising standards of living and the performance of economies, but they may be misleading if only desirable outputs are considered. This study presents estimates of environmentally adjusted multifactor productivity (EAMFP) growth using a new comprehensive database. This database contains information on GHG and CAC emissions, as well as on the production activities of Canadian manufacturers.

    Release date: 2019-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015097
    Description:

    Canada’s aggregate productivity performance has closely tracked changes in Canada’s trading environment. To gain a better understanding of the link, the Economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada has conducted a set of studies that investigate whether and how changes in the trading environment, brought about by trade liberalization policies and exchange-rate movements, contributed to productivity growth. The firm-level analysis provides insights into the productivity dynamics that arise from within-industry growth and restructuring as resources are shifted from declining to growing industries. The paper provides an overview of the key Canadian empirical findings over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2015-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014037
    Description:

    This paper presents estimates of effective multifactor productivity (MFP) growth for Canada, the United States, Australia, Japan and selected European Union (EU) countries, based on the EU KLEMS productivity database and the World Input-Output Tables. Effective MFP growth captures the impact of the productivity gains in upstream industries on the productivity growth and international competitiveness of domestic industries, thereby providing an appropriate measure of productivity growth and international competitiveness in the production of final demand products such as consumption, investment and export products. A substantial portion of MFP growth, especially for small, open economies such as Canada’s, is attributable to gains in the production of intermediate inputs in foreign countries. Productivity growth tends to be higher in investment and export products than for the production of consumption products. Technical progress and productivity growth in foreign countries have made a larger contribution to production growth in investment and export products than in consumption products. The analysis provides empirical evidence consistent with the hypothesis that effective MFP growth is a more informative relevant indicator of international competitiveness than is standard MFP growth.

    Release date: 2014-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2014035
    Description:

    This paper highlights revisions to multifactor productivity (MFP) growth and related variables in the business sector and in individual industries, which resulted from the historical revision of the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) released October 1, 2012, revisions to the labour productivity accounts released October 12, 2012, and changes in the estimation of capital input that were made in order to improve its consistency in industry MFP growth estimates.

    The multifactor productivity program produces indexes of MFP and related measures (output, capital input, labour input and intermediate inputs) for the business sector, broad economic sub-sectors, and their constituent industries. The MFP program divides growth in labour productivity into its key determinants: capital intensity (changes in capital per hour worked), investment in human capital, and MFP, which includes technological change, organizational innovation and economies of scale.

    Release date: 2014-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines two aspects of productivity growth in Canada's broadcasting and telecommunications industry. The first is the extent to which aggregate MFP growth in the sector came from scale economies as opposed to technical progress. The second is the extent to which aggregate labour productivity growth and MFP growth came from within-firm growth, and from the effect of reallocation due to firm entry and exit and within incumbents' the dynamic forces associated with competitive change.

    Release date: 2014-02-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013031
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports the impact of correcting for variations in capacity utilization on multifactor productivity growth in Canadian business industries. It is based on a recently released Statistics Canada research paper. Results show that multifactor productivity growth is procyclical for almost all business industries, and that such pro-cyclicality largely reflects variations in capacity utilization in some industries, especially in manufacturing and mining.

    Release date: 2013-10-04

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2013030
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper provides a provincial perspective on the slowdown in productivity and economic growth in the total business sector in Canada between 2000 and 2010 compared to the late 1990s. It uses the most recent provincial multifactor productivity database.

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series summarizes results from current Statistics Canada research on investment and capital stock accumulation. It is based on the study, "Intangible Capital and Productivity Growth in Canada".

    Release date: 2012-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010063
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines how trade liberalization and fluctuations in real exchange rates affect export-market entry/exit and plant-level productivity. It uses the experience of Canadian manufacturing plants over three separate periods that featuring different rates of bilateral tariff reduction and differing movements in bilateral real exchange rates. The patterns of entry and exit responses as well as the productivity outcomes differ markedly in the three periods. Consistent with much of the recent literature, the paper finds that plants self-select into export markets-that is, more efficient plants are more likely to enter and less likely to exit export markets. The reverse also occurs: entrants to export markets improve their productivity performance relative to the population from which they originated and plants that stay in export markets do better than comparable plants that exited, lending support to the thesis that exporting boosts productivity. Finally, we find that overall market access conditions, including real exchange rate trends, significantly affect the extent of productivity gains to be derived from participating in export markets. In particular, the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar during the post-2002 period almost completely offset the productivity growth advantages that new export-market participants would otherwise have enjoyed.

    Release date: 2010-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2008021
    Description:

    This paper makes use of a growth accounting framework to examine the importance of public capital for private sector productivity growth. Most measures of multifactor productivity consider only the inputs of the business sector. This paper produces an alternate measure of multifactor productivity for the business sector that incorporates the impact of public capital. It uses the estimate of the elasticity of business sector output with respect to public capital derived from Macdonald (2008). Over the period, the conventional estimate of MFP growth averages 0.4% per year. About half of this growth is attributable to public capital.

    Release date: 2009-01-14
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2013031
    Description:

    This paper describes the evolution of the Multifactor Productivity Program launched at Statistics Canada in 1987 and the improvements made in multifactor productivity measurement since then. The improvements were made in response to developments in the economic literature, better data sources, and the needs of the user community. The paper also summarizes research that uses alternate data and methodologies to assess the accuracy of the Multifactor Productivity Program and to provide insights into areas that traditional international multifactor productivity programs omit. Finally, the paper outlines future directions that are being contemplated to further improve the measurement of productivity at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2013-05-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2007014
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) of Statistics Canada maintain two multifactor productivity (MFP) programs.

    The Major Sector Multifactor Productivity Program develops the indexes of MFP for the total business sector and major industry groups in the business sector.

    The Industry Multifactor Productivity Program or the Industry KLEMS Productivity Program develops the industry productivity database that includes MFP indexes, output, capital (K), labour (L), energy (E), materials (M) and services (S) inputs for the individual industries of the business sector at various levels of industry aggregation. This paper describes the methodologies and data sources that are used to construct the major sector MFP indexes and the industry productivity database (or the KLEMS database). More specifically, this paper is meant to:provide a background of the major sector MFP program and the industry KLEMS productivity program;present the methodology for measuring MFP;describe the data sources and data available from the MFP programs;present a quality rating of the industry KLEMS productivity data; anddescribe the research agenda related to the MFP program.

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2007009
    Description:

    This paper examines the effects of alternative specifications of the user costs of capital on the estimated price and volume indices of capital services. It asks how sensitive the results are to the use of exogenous versus endogenous rates of return, to alternate ways of including capital gains, and to whether corrections are made for tax rates. The paper also examines the effect of the various user cost formulae on the measured multifactor productivity growth.

    Release date: 2007-04-04
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