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All (106)

All (106) (20 to 30 of 106 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513142
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Call centres are believed to be largely responsible for the phenomenal growth of the business support services industry over the past two decades. The Labour Force Survey is used to profile call-centre workers and to substantiate or disprove some commonly held perceptions.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007457
    Description:

    The Canadian economy is characterized by the size of the service sector. Elsewhere, the research and development (R&D) activity contributes to the growth of the economy. Paradoxically, R&D is sometime considered as an activity performed by the manufacturing sector. This article sheds light on the importance of efforts dedicated to R&D in the business services sector.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X20040036917
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to address the question: What are the differences between Canada's domestic resort market and the non-resort market?

    Release date: 2004-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036755
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines household spending on entertainment services in 2001, focussing on differences in spending by household type and income. Entertainment services industries rely on spending by various types of households. Knowledge about the characteristics of consumers and their spending patterns enables entertainment service providers to market their products to meet the needs of the current market, and to develop programs to attract new consumers.

    Previous research looking at differences in spending on entertainment services has shown that consumer preferences vary across socio-economic factors such as income, household type and geographical region. Similar to entertainment spending patterns in 1997, there was evidence that Canadians continued to 'cocoon' in 2001, spending more on entertainment inside the home and less outside the home.

    Spending on entertainment services also varied by level of household income. It is not surprising that both the percentage of households that spent on entertainment and the average amount spent increased with income. Households in the highest income quintile accounted for a disproportionate share of the consumer market for entertainment services in 2001.

    The presence of children in the household made a real difference in spending patterns. Households with children represented the highest percentage of reporting households in seven of the eight categories of entertainment spending and, on average, they spent the most in six of the eight categories.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20030036710
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The need for Information Technology (IT) support has never been greater than it is today. Businesses, institutions, government and individuals all rely heavily on IT networks to convey information, process data, and provide or access services.

    This paper describes how a leading IT industry, including computer systems design and related services, has responded to the mounting demand for IT services in Canada. Structural differences between small and large system design firms are explored and data describing industry growth rates, export markets, and employment characteristics are examined.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003046
    Description:

    Services constitute the single most important industry in Canada's economy, with 68% of total gross domestic product, 75% of employment and 53% of consumer spending. However, this industry is not widely perceived as being Canada's spearhead of research and development (R&D), a role more traditionally assigned to the manufacturing sector. Still, services are becoming an increasingly important force in R&D, and this is why we should reconsider the true role played by R&D in the service sector. This article, in fact, sets out to quantify R&D activities within the service sector.

    Here are some highlights of this exploratory study:

    - In 2002, the commercial service sector was responsible for 28.5% of all R&D expenditures for the economy as a whole.

    - In 2000, 36.6% of all personnel assigned full time to R&D worked in the commercial service sector.

    - Quantification of the amounts spent on R&D from within the service sector does not necessarily correspond to traditional industrial classifications. For example, R&D is primarily performed in such sectors as biotechnology, software, telecommunications, the environment and logistics, which are not included in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) classification scheme.

    - Several service sector activities are very labour intensive and require highly skilled R&D workers. For example, of all employees performing R&D in the field of biotechnology, 23% hold doctorates or master's degrees.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003047
    Description:

    Even though all of the campgrounds and outfitters combined were self-categorized as midscale accommodations, 87% of the campgrounds catered to an economy/midscale market while around 84% of the outfitters were midscale/upscale. Only outfitters derived more revenue from packaged vacations than from guest units. Americans made up the greatest number of those visiting Canada's hunting and fishing camps while campgrounds generated most of their business from Canadian travellers. Canada's pristine wilderness draws foreign travellers who want to experience world-class hunting and fishing expeditions.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003045
    Description:

    The need for Information Technology (IT) support has never been greater than it is today. Businesses, institutions, government and individuals, all rely heavily on IT networks to convey information, process data and provide, or access, services.

    This paper focusses on describing how a leading IT industry, Computer Systems Design and Related Services, has responded to the mounting demand for IT services in Canada. The paper explores structural differences between small and large system design firms and examines data describing industry growth rates, export markets and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-09-02

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20030016584
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article analyzes the performance of three services industries which grew strongly in 2001 in spite of the general economic slowdown in that year. The industries analysed are Engineering services, Commercial and industrial machinery and equipment rental and leasing, as well as Surveying and mapping services. In all three industries revenues from natural resources projects, especially oil and gas, were high.

    Release date: 2003-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003044
    Description:

    Today, the phrases 'Fierce competition' and 'Internet access provision' are synonymous. The vastly changing Internet-access market is no longer the domain of its original pioneers - the so called 'traditional' Internet service providers (ISPs). As cable firms, telecommunication carriers and, more recently, wireless carriers flood the market, the business challenges facing firms classified to the ISP industry continue to mount.

    Utilizing data from the 2001 Annual Survey of Internet Service Providers and Related Services, this paper examines some of these challenges by exploring various industry characteristics in conjunction with important issues for future growth. The primary focus of this paper revolves is the industry's perception of factors that impede the growth of businesses and highlights the significant distinguishing characteristics among small, medium and large-sized firms. Examination of responses from firms revealed five principal obstacles to growth: 1) competition; 2) cost-related impediments revolving around both ends of the ISP business, their links to consumers and their links to the Internet; 3) delays in obtaining facilities from suppliers; 4) access to financing; and 5) access to markets.

    To provide additional context to the main analysis, the paper also contains background information on the demand and supply side of the Internet-access market, financial performance analysis and structure of the ISP industry.

    Release date: 2003-07-15
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Analysis (106)

Analysis (106) (0 to 10 of 106 results)

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2019004
    Description:

    This article presents emissions estimates related to spending on food and beverage products and services. These estimates are based on an input-output model that combines physical flow data on greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by industry with economic data on production and consumption of goods and services.

    Release date: 2019-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017067
    Description:

    This Economic Insights compares the performance of automotive manufacturers and service providers since the 2008-2009 recession. The report highlights the structural declines in manufacturing, as export-oriented Canadian manufacturers have lost market share to Mexico. On account of strong post-recession growth in consumer demand for new motor vehicles in Canada, trends for the service industries have differed from manufacturing when comparing performance for output, employment and earnings. The paper will outline the differences in post-recession performance for these key indicators.

    Release date: 2017-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2016081
    Description:

    The Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators (PTCI) are timely economic estimates of culture and sport in Canada. The PTCI are an extension of the more comprehensive Provincial and Territorial Culture Satellite Account and measure the economic importance of culture and sport in terms of output, gross domestic product and employment across Canada for reference years 2010 to 2014.

    Release date: 2016-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009083
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the legal and accounting industries, and highlights key characteristics of these industries in relation to the professional sector as a whole and to the Canadian economy. Trends in employment, earnings, output as measured by gross domestic product, capital expenditures, rates of self-employment and of incorporation are investigated. Also socio-economic characteristics of the workforce in legal and accounting services industries are examined.

    Release date: 2009-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200800210622
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Fishing or angling has historically been a popular leisure activity for both Canadians and visitors alike. This article provides a portrait of recreational fishing in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-06-25

  • 7. Kids' Sports Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110573
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article will examine trends in organized sports participation of children aged 5 to 14, and the important role that the family plays. It will also look at the factors that influence children's participation in sports including parental involvement in sports, socio-demographic characteristics of the family, and geography.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2008053
    Description:

    With the growth of the service economy, business support services have become more important to the Canadian economy. Changes in business practices such as outsourcing have been made possible by advances in telecommunications technology. Consequently, the business support services industry, which includes credit agencies, telephone call centres, and document preparation and business service centres, has experienced steady growth. Telephone call centres in particular have been identified as potential catalysts for regional development. Research in this area has tended to deal with employment issues (e.g. job creation) or with case studies of firms or communities. Using an industry life cycle approach, this study examines the changing location of telephone call centres.

    Release date: 2008-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2007052
    Description:

    This paper shows how peoples decisions on whether to own or rent their residences impacted residential landlords and their market. It will also examine how the characteristics of renters have changed since 1986, and offer a brief profile of the residential real estate lessors industry.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006006
    Description:

    This paper conceptualizes business incubation and translates theoretical ideas into measurable metrics. Specifically, it explains and develops the concept, discusses the influence of major economic and technological events on its evolution, identifies different models and explains how business incubators create value. It then explains how these concepts have been implemented in Statistics Canada's first survey of business incubators.

    Release date: 2006-07-24
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