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All (34) (0 to 10 of 34 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-222-X
    Description: Labour Statistics at a Glance features short analytical articles on specific topics of interest related to Canada's labour market. The studies examine recent or historical trends using data produced by the Centre for Labour Market Information, i.e., the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment Payrolls and Hours, the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey and the Employment Insurance Statistics Program.
    Release date: 2024-06-13

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2024024
    Description: Using data from the 2022 Time Use Survey, this infographic provides highlights from the study “Telework, time use, and well-being: Evidence from the 2022 Time Use Survey.” Data about the differences in time use between teleworkers and non-teleworkers are shown, particularly where time saved on the commute to and from work is reallocated to other activities such as time spent with children. The infographic also shows the differences in satisfaction with work-life balance when comparing the two groups.
    Release date: 2024-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2024003
    Description: Using data from the 2022 Time Use Survey, this study explores how teleworking is associated with time use and well-being. Two primary research questions are addressed: First, is teleworking associated with time use – such as time in sleep, paid and unpaid work, and leisure? Second, is teleworking associated with work-life balance and time pressure?
    Release date: 2024-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2024001
    Description: This study applies small area estimation (SAE) and a new geographic concept called Self-contained Labor Area (SLA) to the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions (CSBC) with a focus on remote work opportunities in rural labor markets. Through SAE modelling, we estimate the proportions of businesses, classified by general industrial sector (service providers and goods producers), that would primarily offer remote work opportunities to their workforce.
    Release date: 2024-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X202400100002
    Description: Using 2021 Census data, this article examines the link between working from home and the languages used at work. It focuses on three Census metropolitan areas (CMAs) of Moncton, Montréal and Ottawa–Gatineau—three regions where both English and French are used widely at work.
    Release date: 2024-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2023006
    Description: Using Statistics Canada’s COVID-19 Restriction Index and estimates of telework feasibility, this study models, for the period from January 2020 to July 2022, the percentage of Canadian workers who worked most of their hours from home in a given province during a given month.
    Release date: 2023-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202201100001
    Description:

    The Canadian economy has experienced numerous changes over the last four decades. Employment has moved away from manufacturing and towards service sector jobs. Technological changes have brought computer-based technologies and, more recently, robotics and artificial intelligence to the workplace. World prices of oil and natural resources have fluctuated considerably. Since March 2020, work arrangements have been altered substantially, with thousands of employees starting to work from home. In this evolving context, how have unionization rates evolved in Canada over the last four decades? This article uses data from the Survey of Work History of 1981 and the Labour Force Survey to answer this question.

    Release date: 2022-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200800001
    Description:

    As COVID-19 began to spread throughout Canada and the United States in early 2020, many employees were asked to work from home to help control the spread of the virus. COVID restrictions were more stringent in Canada than in the U.S., at least throughout 2021, and the degree to which Canadian and U.S. employees worked from home during the pandemic may have differed across countries. The goal of this paper is to fill this information gap and analyze the trends in work from home rates between the two countries from May 2020 to December 2021.

    Release date: 2022-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200700001
    Description:

    As the labour market recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative to assess which strategies Canadian employers plan to use over the next few months to cope with labour scarcity. This study documents the strategies that private sector businesses expecting labour shortages at the beginning of 2022 plan to use during that year to deal with personnel recruitment, retention and training. The study also investigates the degree to which businesses’ plans to offer telework and flexible scheduling varies across industries.

    Release date: 2022-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200500001
    Description:

    One commonly held view of telework is that prior to COVID-19, teleworkers might have been promoted less often than other employees or might have declined job offers for high-paying jobs that did not offer the opportunity to work from home. Such scenarios imply that prior to COVID-19, employees working from home would have experienced lower wage growth in the long term than other employees. This study assesses whether this is the case using integrated data from Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File (LWF) and the 2006 and 2016 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2022-05-25
Data (7)

Data (7) ((7 results))

Analysis (27)

Analysis (27) (0 to 10 of 27 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-222-X
    Description: Labour Statistics at a Glance features short analytical articles on specific topics of interest related to Canada's labour market. The studies examine recent or historical trends using data produced by the Centre for Labour Market Information, i.e., the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment Payrolls and Hours, the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey and the Employment Insurance Statistics Program.
    Release date: 2024-06-13

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2024024
    Description: Using data from the 2022 Time Use Survey, this infographic provides highlights from the study “Telework, time use, and well-being: Evidence from the 2022 Time Use Survey.” Data about the differences in time use between teleworkers and non-teleworkers are shown, particularly where time saved on the commute to and from work is reallocated to other activities such as time spent with children. The infographic also shows the differences in satisfaction with work-life balance when comparing the two groups.
    Release date: 2024-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2024003
    Description: Using data from the 2022 Time Use Survey, this study explores how teleworking is associated with time use and well-being. Two primary research questions are addressed: First, is teleworking associated with time use – such as time in sleep, paid and unpaid work, and leisure? Second, is teleworking associated with work-life balance and time pressure?
    Release date: 2024-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2024001
    Description: This study applies small area estimation (SAE) and a new geographic concept called Self-contained Labor Area (SLA) to the Canadian Survey on Business Conditions (CSBC) with a focus on remote work opportunities in rural labor markets. Through SAE modelling, we estimate the proportions of businesses, classified by general industrial sector (service providers and goods producers), that would primarily offer remote work opportunities to their workforce.
    Release date: 2024-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X202400100002
    Description: Using 2021 Census data, this article examines the link between working from home and the languages used at work. It focuses on three Census metropolitan areas (CMAs) of Moncton, Montréal and Ottawa–Gatineau—three regions where both English and French are used widely at work.
    Release date: 2024-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2023006
    Description: Using Statistics Canada’s COVID-19 Restriction Index and estimates of telework feasibility, this study models, for the period from January 2020 to July 2022, the percentage of Canadian workers who worked most of their hours from home in a given province during a given month.
    Release date: 2023-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202201100001
    Description:

    The Canadian economy has experienced numerous changes over the last four decades. Employment has moved away from manufacturing and towards service sector jobs. Technological changes have brought computer-based technologies and, more recently, robotics and artificial intelligence to the workplace. World prices of oil and natural resources have fluctuated considerably. Since March 2020, work arrangements have been altered substantially, with thousands of employees starting to work from home. In this evolving context, how have unionization rates evolved in Canada over the last four decades? This article uses data from the Survey of Work History of 1981 and the Labour Force Survey to answer this question.

    Release date: 2022-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200800001
    Description:

    As COVID-19 began to spread throughout Canada and the United States in early 2020, many employees were asked to work from home to help control the spread of the virus. COVID restrictions were more stringent in Canada than in the U.S., at least throughout 2021, and the degree to which Canadian and U.S. employees worked from home during the pandemic may have differed across countries. The goal of this paper is to fill this information gap and analyze the trends in work from home rates between the two countries from May 2020 to December 2021.

    Release date: 2022-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200700001
    Description:

    As the labour market recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative to assess which strategies Canadian employers plan to use over the next few months to cope with labour scarcity. This study documents the strategies that private sector businesses expecting labour shortages at the beginning of 2022 plan to use during that year to deal with personnel recruitment, retention and training. The study also investigates the degree to which businesses’ plans to offer telework and flexible scheduling varies across industries.

    Release date: 2022-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200500001
    Description:

    One commonly held view of telework is that prior to COVID-19, teleworkers might have been promoted less often than other employees or might have declined job offers for high-paying jobs that did not offer the opportunity to work from home. Such scenarios imply that prior to COVID-19, employees working from home would have experienced lower wage growth in the long term than other employees. This study assesses whether this is the case using integrated data from Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File (LWF) and the 2006 and 2016 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2022-05-25
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