Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

3 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (31)

All (31) (0 to 10 of 31 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X202400100002
    Description: Using 2021 Census data, this article examines the link between working from home and the languages used at work. It focuses on three Census metropolitan areas (CMAs) of Moncton, Montréal and Ottawa–Gatineau—three regions where both English and French are used widely at work.
    Release date: 2024-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2023006
    Description: Using Statistics Canada’s COVID-19 Restriction Index and estimates of telework feasibility, this study models, for the period from January 2020 to July 2022, the percentage of Canadian workers who worked most of their hours from home in a given province during a given month.
    Release date: 2023-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202201100001
    Description:

    The Canadian economy has experienced numerous changes over the last four decades. Employment has moved away from manufacturing and towards service sector jobs. Technological changes have brought computer-based technologies and, more recently, robotics and artificial intelligence to the workplace. World prices of oil and natural resources have fluctuated considerably. Since March 2020, work arrangements have been altered substantially, with thousands of employees starting to work from home. In this evolving context, how have unionization rates evolved in Canada over the last four decades? This article uses data from the Survey of Work History of 1981 and the Labour Force Survey to answer this question.

    Release date: 2022-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200800001
    Description:

    As COVID-19 began to spread throughout Canada and the United States in early 2020, many employees were asked to work from home to help control the spread of the virus. COVID restrictions were more stringent in Canada than in the U.S., at least throughout 2021, and the degree to which Canadian and U.S. employees worked from home during the pandemic may have differed across countries. The goal of this paper is to fill this information gap and analyze the trends in work from home rates between the two countries from May 2020 to December 2021.

    Release date: 2022-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200700001
    Description:

    As the labour market recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative to assess which strategies Canadian employers plan to use over the next few months to cope with labour scarcity. This study documents the strategies that private sector businesses expecting labour shortages at the beginning of 2022 plan to use during that year to deal with personnel recruitment, retention and training. The study also investigates the degree to which businesses’ plans to offer telework and flexible scheduling varies across industries.

    Release date: 2022-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200500001
    Description:

    One commonly held view of telework is that prior to COVID-19, teleworkers might have been promoted less often than other employees or might have declined job offers for high-paying jobs that did not offer the opportunity to work from home. Such scenarios imply that prior to COVID-19, employees working from home would have experienced lower wage growth in the long term than other employees. This study assesses whether this is the case using integrated data from Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File (LWF) and the 2006 and 2016 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2022-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200001
    Description:

    The substantial increase in telework observed since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic has raised the possibility that in the near future, some Canadian workers might be able to work from home for an employer located in another province or territory. This article focuses on this group of teleworkers and assesses the amount of people who worked remotely, the groups that were more likely to telecommute, their compensation compared to that of other teleworkers, and the amount of teleworkers that are likely to work remotely in the future.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202101000001
    Description:

    Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Statistics Canada has produced several studies on work from home. This article synthesizes the key findings of these studies and identifies questions for future research.

    Release date: 2021-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100500001
    Description:

    As is now well known, the COVID-19 pandemic substantially increased work from home in Canada. This “Spotlight on data and research” estimates to what extent Canadians would prefer working from home once the COVID-19 pandemic is over. The answer has potentially significant implications for future traffic congestion, public transit use, greenhouse gas emissions, demand for office space in city centres and for housing in suburbs, and the dynamism (or lack thereof) of retail trade stores and restaurants located in downtown areas.

    Release date: 2021-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400005
    Description: The increase in telework observed in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic shows that far more workers are able to work from home than had been observed prior to the pandemic.

    The economic costs of the pandemic to this point have been significant and pervasive, both in Canada and other countries. However, the rapid labour market adjustment to telework offers some potential longer-term benefits for a variety of reasons. More broadly, from urban planning and environmental perspectives, more widespread adoption of telework would result in less commuter traffic and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study estimates the extent to which commuter traffic would decrease, which modes of transportation would see the largest decreases and the resulting implications for GHG emissions if the Canadian economy were to operate at its maximum telework capacity, expressed relative to the commuter levels that prevailed before the pandemic.

    Release date: 2021-04-22
Data (7)

Data (7) ((7 results))

Analysis (24)

Analysis (24) (0 to 10 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X202400100002
    Description: Using 2021 Census data, this article examines the link between working from home and the languages used at work. It focuses on three Census metropolitan areas (CMAs) of Moncton, Montréal and Ottawa–Gatineau—three regions where both English and French are used widely at work.
    Release date: 2024-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2023006
    Description: Using Statistics Canada’s COVID-19 Restriction Index and estimates of telework feasibility, this study models, for the period from January 2020 to July 2022, the percentage of Canadian workers who worked most of their hours from home in a given province during a given month.
    Release date: 2023-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202201100001
    Description:

    The Canadian economy has experienced numerous changes over the last four decades. Employment has moved away from manufacturing and towards service sector jobs. Technological changes have brought computer-based technologies and, more recently, robotics and artificial intelligence to the workplace. World prices of oil and natural resources have fluctuated considerably. Since March 2020, work arrangements have been altered substantially, with thousands of employees starting to work from home. In this evolving context, how have unionization rates evolved in Canada over the last four decades? This article uses data from the Survey of Work History of 1981 and the Labour Force Survey to answer this question.

    Release date: 2022-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200800001
    Description:

    As COVID-19 began to spread throughout Canada and the United States in early 2020, many employees were asked to work from home to help control the spread of the virus. COVID restrictions were more stringent in Canada than in the U.S., at least throughout 2021, and the degree to which Canadian and U.S. employees worked from home during the pandemic may have differed across countries. The goal of this paper is to fill this information gap and analyze the trends in work from home rates between the two countries from May 2020 to December 2021.

    Release date: 2022-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200700001
    Description:

    As the labour market recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative to assess which strategies Canadian employers plan to use over the next few months to cope with labour scarcity. This study documents the strategies that private sector businesses expecting labour shortages at the beginning of 2022 plan to use during that year to deal with personnel recruitment, retention and training. The study also investigates the degree to which businesses’ plans to offer telework and flexible scheduling varies across industries.

    Release date: 2022-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200500001
    Description:

    One commonly held view of telework is that prior to COVID-19, teleworkers might have been promoted less often than other employees or might have declined job offers for high-paying jobs that did not offer the opportunity to work from home. Such scenarios imply that prior to COVID-19, employees working from home would have experienced lower wage growth in the long term than other employees. This study assesses whether this is the case using integrated data from Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker File (LWF) and the 2006 and 2016 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2022-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200200001
    Description:

    The substantial increase in telework observed since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic has raised the possibility that in the near future, some Canadian workers might be able to work from home for an employer located in another province or territory. This article focuses on this group of teleworkers and assesses the amount of people who worked remotely, the groups that were more likely to telecommute, their compensation compared to that of other teleworkers, and the amount of teleworkers that are likely to work remotely in the future.

    Release date: 2022-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202101000001
    Description:

    Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Statistics Canada has produced several studies on work from home. This article synthesizes the key findings of these studies and identifies questions for future research.

    Release date: 2021-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100500001
    Description:

    As is now well known, the COVID-19 pandemic substantially increased work from home in Canada. This “Spotlight on data and research” estimates to what extent Canadians would prefer working from home once the COVID-19 pandemic is over. The answer has potentially significant implications for future traffic congestion, public transit use, greenhouse gas emissions, demand for office space in city centres and for housing in suburbs, and the dynamism (or lack thereof) of retail trade stores and restaurants located in downtown areas.

    Release date: 2021-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400005
    Description: The increase in telework observed in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic shows that far more workers are able to work from home than had been observed prior to the pandemic.

    The economic costs of the pandemic to this point have been significant and pervasive, both in Canada and other countries. However, the rapid labour market adjustment to telework offers some potential longer-term benefits for a variety of reasons. More broadly, from urban planning and environmental perspectives, more widespread adoption of telework would result in less commuter traffic and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study estimates the extent to which commuter traffic would decrease, which modes of transportation would see the largest decreases and the resulting implications for GHG emissions if the Canadian economy were to operate at its maximum telework capacity, expressed relative to the commuter levels that prevailed before the pandemic.

    Release date: 2021-04-22
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: