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All (92) (0 to 10 of 92 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020001
    Description:

    Multifactor productivity (MFP) declined in Canada from 2000 to 2009 and then recovered after. The movements in productivity since 2000 have attracted great attention from researchers and policy makers because productivity is important both for economic growth and for improvements in living standards. This paper applies the stochastic frontier framework to decompose each firm’s MFP into two parts: its technological frontier and its technical efficiency. Change in the aggregate technological frontier refers to improvements in the productivity potential of an economy, i.e., the maximum productivity of an economy if all firms are fully efficient. Aggregate technical efficiency reflects the economy’s capacity to achieve that potential. The results of this decomposition can show whether the movements in productivity after 2000 in Canada were mainly the result of changes in the technological frontier and productivity potential or of changes in the technical efficiency.

    Release date: 2020-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210739
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) included two questions that dealt with the issues of organizational and technological change. This article will examine organizational and technological change in the private and public sectors, providing the first look at this cross-economy data. An upcoming article will explore the relationship between the introduction of significantly improved organizational structures, management techniques, or technology and the training associated with implementation of these changes.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-552-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was a seven-country initiative conducted in the fall of 1994. Its goal was to create comparable literacy profiles across national, linguistic and cultural boundaries. Successive waves of the survey now encompass close to 30 countries around the world. This monograph series features detailed studies from the IALS database by literacy scholars and experts in Canada and the United States. The research is primarily funded by Human Resources Development Canada. Monographs focus on current policy issues and cover topics such as adult training, literacy skill match and mismatch in the workplace, seniors' literacy skills and health, literacy and economic security, and many others.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2008001
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of innovative exporting firms using formal intellectual property (IP) regimes and those using informal intellectual property regimes. Two service industry groups are examined: Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Selected Professional, Scientific and Technical Services. The data are based on the 2003 Survey of Innovation

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2007006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper employs the databases that are used to construct Statistics Canada's Productivity Accounts to examine the sources of growth in the Canadian economy and the history of productivity growth in Canada over the period 1961 to 2002. It makes use of a new time series using the North American Industry Classification System. The growth accounting system provides the framework for the analysis. This framework provides estimates of the relative importance of labour inputs, investments in capital, and productivity growth. The data that are required to address this issue also allow changes in the composition of capital and labour inputs to be investigated. In addition, the underlying factors that determine labour productivity (multifactor productivity, capital deepening, and increases in skill level) are outlined. Since the database is constructed at the industry level, all these relationships can be pursued both at the level of the total economy and for individual industries.

    Release date: 2007-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200611013173
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Rapid technological change and an increased emphasis on skill-based knowledge have led to an increased need for training entry-level workers and retraining older ones. How do the training rates of workers aged 25 to 34 compare with those aged 55 to 64? Personal and job-related characteristics are examined for training participants, as are employer support, self-directed learning, barriers faced, and objectives and outcomes of training.

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610613165
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2000, and particularly the latter half of the 1990s, the earnings gap widened between young workers who were less-educated and those who were well-educated. Some research attributes the gap to technological change, which requires a workforce that is more skilled and better educated. The subsequent demand resulted in higher wages for such workers and hence increased returns to education. However, the past five years have seen strong job growth in industries that employ many young people with less education. How has the earnings gap been affected?

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006006
    Description:

    This paper conceptualizes business incubation and translates theoretical ideas into measurable metrics. Specifically, it explains and develops the concept, discusses the influence of major economic and technological events on its evolution, identifies different models and explains how business incubators create value. It then explains how these concepts have been implemented in Statistics Canada's first survey of business incubators.

    Release date: 2006-07-24
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 87-211-X
    Description:

    The third edition of Canadian culture in perspective: a statistical overview, provides a comprehensive statistical portrait of the health and vitality of cultural activities and industries in Canada. This compendium incorporates data from all surveys in Statistics Canada's Culture Statistics Program, as well as data from other internal and external sources, enabling readers to track various themes and trends over time.

    This edition contains sections on: the economic impact of the culture sector, culture activities by tourists and the international trade position of the culture sector; on social dimensions of culture, including characteristics of the cultural labour force, philanthropic behaviour, and the consumers of cultural goods and services; and on various sectors such as heritage, the performing arts and festivals, visual arts and libraries. It also explores ownership and content issues in the culture industries (publishing, film, broadcasting and music).

    Release date: 2000-12-22
Analysis (87)

Analysis (87) (0 to 10 of 87 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020001
    Description:

    Multifactor productivity (MFP) declined in Canada from 2000 to 2009 and then recovered after. The movements in productivity since 2000 have attracted great attention from researchers and policy makers because productivity is important both for economic growth and for improvements in living standards. This paper applies the stochastic frontier framework to decompose each firm’s MFP into two parts: its technological frontier and its technical efficiency. Change in the aggregate technological frontier refers to improvements in the productivity potential of an economy, i.e., the maximum productivity of an economy if all firms are fully efficient. Aggregate technical efficiency reflects the economy’s capacity to achieve that potential. The results of this decomposition can show whether the movements in productivity after 2000 in Canada were mainly the result of changes in the technological frontier and productivity potential or of changes in the technical efficiency.

    Release date: 2020-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210739
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) included two questions that dealt with the issues of organizational and technological change. This article will examine organizational and technological change in the private and public sectors, providing the first look at this cross-economy data. An upcoming article will explore the relationship between the introduction of significantly improved organizational structures, management techniques, or technology and the training associated with implementation of these changes.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-552-M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was a seven-country initiative conducted in the fall of 1994. Its goal was to create comparable literacy profiles across national, linguistic and cultural boundaries. Successive waves of the survey now encompass close to 30 countries around the world. This monograph series features detailed studies from the IALS database by literacy scholars and experts in Canada and the United States. The research is primarily funded by Human Resources Development Canada. Monographs focus on current policy issues and cover topics such as adult training, literacy skill match and mismatch in the workplace, seniors' literacy skills and health, literacy and economic security, and many others.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2008001
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of innovative exporting firms using formal intellectual property (IP) regimes and those using informal intellectual property regimes. Two service industry groups are examined: Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Selected Professional, Scientific and Technical Services. The data are based on the 2003 Survey of Innovation

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2007006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper employs the databases that are used to construct Statistics Canada's Productivity Accounts to examine the sources of growth in the Canadian economy and the history of productivity growth in Canada over the period 1961 to 2002. It makes use of a new time series using the North American Industry Classification System. The growth accounting system provides the framework for the analysis. This framework provides estimates of the relative importance of labour inputs, investments in capital, and productivity growth. The data that are required to address this issue also allow changes in the composition of capital and labour inputs to be investigated. In addition, the underlying factors that determine labour productivity (multifactor productivity, capital deepening, and increases in skill level) are outlined. Since the database is constructed at the industry level, all these relationships can be pursued both at the level of the total economy and for individual industries.

    Release date: 2007-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200611013173
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Rapid technological change and an increased emphasis on skill-based knowledge have led to an increased need for training entry-level workers and retraining older ones. How do the training rates of workers aged 25 to 34 compare with those aged 55 to 64? Personal and job-related characteristics are examined for training participants, as are employer support, self-directed learning, barriers faced, and objectives and outcomes of training.

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610613165
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2000, and particularly the latter half of the 1990s, the earnings gap widened between young workers who were less-educated and those who were well-educated. Some research attributes the gap to technological change, which requires a workforce that is more skilled and better educated. The subsequent demand resulted in higher wages for such workers and hence increased returns to education. However, the past five years have seen strong job growth in industries that employ many young people with less education. How has the earnings gap been affected?

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006006
    Description:

    This paper conceptualizes business incubation and translates theoretical ideas into measurable metrics. Specifically, it explains and develops the concept, discusses the influence of major economic and technological events on its evolution, identifies different models and explains how business incubators create value. It then explains how these concepts have been implemented in Statistics Canada's first survey of business incubators.

    Release date: 2006-07-24
Reference (4)

Reference (4) ((4 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19990015640
    Description:

    This paper states how SN is preparing for a new era in the making of statistics, as it is triggered by technological and methodological developments. An essential feature of the turn to the new era is the farewell to the stovepipe way of data processing. The paper discusses how new technological and methodological tools will affect processes and their organization. Special emphasis is put on one of the major chances and challenges the new tools offer: establishing coherence in the content of statistics and in the presentation to users.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19990024878
    Description:

    In his paper Fritz Scheuren considers the possible uses of administrative records to enhance and improve population censuses. After reviewing previous uses of administrative records in an international context, he puts forward several proposals for research and development towards increased use of administrative records in the American statistical system.

    Release date: 2000-03-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1994008
    Description:

    This document describes the survey content for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income data questionnaire and explains the interview process.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1995012
    Description:

    This paper describes the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income data collection procedures and provides an overview of the interview process. May 1995 was the first year respondents could choose to carry out the interview as in the previous year, or they could grant permission for Statistics Canada to access their income tax returns from Revenue Canada and forego the interview.

    Release date: 1995-12-30
Date modified: