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  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100023
    Description:

    Using the 2016 Census and the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, the article highlights key measures of economic well being (low income, food security, ability to deal with unexpected expenses) for First Nations people, Métis and Inuit living in urban areas.

    Release date: 2020-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020006
    Description:

    This paper examines the role of firm characteristics in accounting for the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion in the Canadian business sector between 2002 and 2015. It uses two decomposition methods to analyze the level of and changes in the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion by firm characteristics, such as productivity, globalization status (importing, exporting, foreign ownership), technology intensity, firm size, firm age, industry and geographic region.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020007
    Description:

    The dispersion of earnings among workers may come from multiple sources. It may reflect differences in workers’ characteristics, such as education and experience. It may also be because workers are employed at different firms that pay differently. Recent studies from other countries have found that firms play an important role in explaining earnings disparities among workers, often through the link between productivity and pay. However, there has been no Canadian evidence on the link between the earnings dispersion and firm differences because of a lack of matched employer–employee data. This paper presents developments in the dispersion of individuals’ earnings in Canada and examines the potential of firm characteristics to account for this dispersion and changes in this dispersion in the post-2000 period using the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Table: 11-23-0001
    Description:

    Annual information is available on Canadians who filed a personal tax return in the reference year. Data provided include the number and percentage of tax filers with wages, salaries and commissions, as well as the median wages, salaries and commissions by sex, age group and main industry based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). The latest data (2018) can be requested for selected levels of postal and census geographies. The statistics are derived from a preliminary version of the annual taxfile provided by the Canada Revenue Agency.

    Release date: 2020-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2020001
    Description:

    This paper reviews alternative measures of income mixing within geographic units and applies them using geographically detailed income data derived from tax records. It highlights the characteristics of these measures, particularly their ease of interpretation and their suitability to decomposition across different levels of analysis, from neighbourhoods to individual apartment buildings. The discussion focuses on three measures: the dissimilarity index, the information theory index and the divergence index (D-index). Particular emphasis is placed on the D-index because it most effectively describes how income distributions at the sub-metropolitan level (e.g., neighbourhoods) differ from distributions at the metropolitan level (i.e., how much income sorting occurs across neighbourhoods). Furthermore, the D-index can consistently measure the contributions of income sorting within neighbourhoods (e.g., across individual apartment buildings) to the degree of income mixing at the neighbourhood and metropolitan scales.

    Release date: 2020-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200002
    Description:

    The routine measurement of population health status indicators like mortality is important to assess progress in the reduction of inequalities. Previous studies of mortality inequalities have relied on area-based measures of socioeconomic indicators. A new series of census-mortality linked datasets has been created in Canada to quantify mortality inequalities based on individual-level data and examine whether these inequalities have changed over time. This study used the 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006, and 2011 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs) with five years of mortality follow-up. It estimated age-standardized mortality rates by sex according to income quintile and highest level of educational attainment categories for the household population aged 25 or older.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019023
    Description:

    In Canada, immigrants represented more than half of the population in the prime working ages with at least a bachelor’s degree in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields of study in 2016. They accounted for three-quarters of engineering and computer science graduates with a master’s or doctorate degree. This paper examines the skill utilization and earnings of employed STEM-educated immigrants by field of study and degree level.

    Release date: 2019-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019016
    Description:

    University graduates generally earn more than community college graduates, both shortly after graduation and for many years thereafter (Frenette 2019). This may partially reflect the fact that university programs are generally longer in duration. Most university students enroll in a four-year bachelor’s degree program, whereas most college students enroll in a one-year certificate program or in a two- or three-year diploma program. Recently, some colleges (mostly situated in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia) have been offering four-year bachelor’s degree programs. Given the emergence of these new offerings, it would be informative for students, parents, education planners and employers to know whether college bachelor’s degree (CBD) programs are associated with similar labour market and educational pathways as university bachelor’s degree (UBD) programs.

    Release date: 2019-09-09

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019029
    Description:

    This infographic examines economic wellbeing for millennials (those between 25 and 34 years old in 2016) and provides a comparison with generation X at the same age (those between 25 and 34 years old in 1999). Information is provided on income, assets, debts and net worth.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019004
    Description:

    The study aims to discuss homelessness in Canada. Using data from the 2016 Census of Population, we shed light on a segment of homelessness by characterising individuals who were staying in a shelter on Census Day in 2016. The study profiles these individuals by geography, age, sex, and marital status. The study also looks more closely at income levels and income sources in order to highlight the differences between residents who live in particular types of shelters as well as the population living in private dwellings.

    Release date: 2019-04-15
Data (22)

Data (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Table: 11-23-0001
    Description:

    Annual information is available on Canadians who filed a personal tax return in the reference year. Data provided include the number and percentage of tax filers with wages, salaries and commissions, as well as the median wages, salaries and commissions by sex, age group and main industry based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). The latest data (2018) can be requested for selected levels of postal and census geographies. The statistics are derived from a preliminary version of the annual taxfile provided by the Canada Revenue Agency.

    Release date: 2020-02-18

  • Table: 11-10-0036-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 109-0007)
    Frequency: Every 5 years
    Description:

    This table contains 2052 series, with data for years 1996 - 1996 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years), and is no longer being released. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (171 items: Canada; Newfoundland and Labrador; Health and Community Services St John's Region, Newfoundland and Labrador; Health and Community Services Eastern Region, Newfoundland and Labrador; ...);  Income profile (12 items: Total, economic families; Economic families - low income; Economic families - other income; Economic families - incidence of low income; ...).

    Release date: 2017-03-06

  • Table: 99-014-X2011043
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration, Census metropolitan area part, Census agglomeration part
    Description:

    This table presents a cross-tabulation of data using selected characteristics from the National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2013-09-11

  • Table: 97-563-X2006017
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Income and earnings,' which presents data on the income of Canadian individuals, families, and households in the year 2005, including the composition of income, and data that serve to measure low income, known as the low income cut-off (LICO). The data also include the household incomes of Canadians by family type, age, and geography, as well as the household incomes of certain population groups (e.g., immigrants).

    The composition of income includes earnings, income from government sources, and investments.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Income and Earnings, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-563-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-563-XWE2006017.

    Release date: 2008-05-01

  • Table: 97-563-X2006029
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Income and earnings,' which presents data on the income of Canadian individuals, families, and households in the year 2005, including the composition of income, and data that serve to measure low income, known as the low income cut-off (LICO). The data also include the household incomes of Canadians by family type, age, and geography, as well as the household incomes of certain population groups (e.g., immigrants).

    The composition of income includes earnings, income from government sources, and investments.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Income and Earnings, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-563-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-563-XWE2006029.

    Release date: 2008-05-01

  • Table: 97F0020X2001080
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Income of Individuals, Families and Households," which shows 2001 Census data on the income of Canadian individuals, families and households in the year 2000. The data include the composition of income that serves to measure low income, known as the low-income cut-off (LICO). The composition of income consists of earnings, income from government sources and investments. The data also include the household incomes of Canadians by family type, age and geography, as well as the household incomes of certain population groups, such as immigrants.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0020XIE2001080.

    Release date: 2004-01-08

  • Table: 97F0020X2001081
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Income of Individuals, Families and Households," which shows 2001 Census data on the income of Canadian individuals, families and households in the year 2000. The data include the composition of income that serves to measure low income, known as the low-income cut-off (LICO). The composition of income consists of earnings, income from government sources and investments. The data also include the household incomes of Canadians by family type, age and geography, as well as the household incomes of certain population groups, such as immigrants.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0020XIE2001081.

    Release date: 2004-01-08

  • Table: 13-217-X
    Description:

    This publication presents detailed tabulations on annual employment earnings of men and women from data collected by the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF), an annual supplement to the monthly Labour Force Survey (LFS). The report, one in a series of annual reports from the SCF, enables users to contrast and compare the earnings status of men and women, with tables presenting statistics by sex for two major subgroups of earners: those that worked at a full-time job year-round (where "year-round" is defined as forty-nine or more weeks of the year), and all other workers (ie., those that worked at a part-time job from one to fifty-two weeks, combined with those that worked full-time for less than forty-nine weeks).

    Release date: 1999-05-28

  • Table: 94F0009X1996096
    Description:

    Series Description - The Dimensions Series (1996 Census of Population) provides an in-depth analysis of census data. More than 150 tables represent a variety of special interest subjects linking a number of Census variables. Statistical information is presented on themes of considerable public interest with some tables examining historical trends and other tables detailing significant sub-populations. Data for geographical levels of Canada, Provinces and Territories are most widely represented with some data tables produced at the Census Metropolitan Area level. The Portrait of Official Language Communities in Canada and the Portrait of Aboriginal Population of Canada contain some information at the community level.

    The data tables are grouped by common theme and are available on 7 different CD-ROMs:

    94F0004XCB96000 - Ethnocultural and Social Characteristics of the Canadian Population94F0005XCB96000 - Canadian Income and Earnings for 1990 and 199594F0006XCB96000 - Labour Force and Unpaid Work of Canadians94F0007XCB96000 - Place of Work of the Canadian Population94F0008XCB96000 - Canadian Demographic Characteristics (including language and mobility)94F0010XCB96000 - Portrait of Official Language Communities in Canada94F0011XCB96000 - Portrait of Aboriginal Population in Canada

    A detailed list of tables is included on each CD-ROM. Some tables show comparisons with data from earlier censuses to provide an historical perspective. It should be noted that the Dimension Series was not produced for the 1991 Census.

    Release date: 1999-02-15

  • Table: 94F0009X1996098
    Description:

    Series Description - The Dimensions Series (1996 Census of Population) provides an in-depth analysis of census data. More than 150 tables represent a variety of special interest subjects linking a number of Census variables. Statistical information is presented on themes of considerable public interest with some tables examining historical trends and other tables detailing significant sub-populations. Data for geographical levels of Canada, Provinces and Territories are most widely represented with some data tables produced at the Census Metropolitan Area level. The Portrait of Official Language Communities in Canada and the Portrait of Aboriginal Population of Canada contain some information at the community level.

    The data tables are grouped by common theme and are available on 7 different CD-ROMs:

    94F0004XCB96000 - Ethnocultural and Social Characteristics of the Canadian Population94F0005XCB96000 - Canadian Income and Earnings for 1990 and 199594F0006XCB96000 - Labour Force and Unpaid Work of Canadians94F0007XCB96000 - Place of Work of the Canadian Population94F0008XCB96000 - Canadian Demographic Characteristics (including language and mobility)94F0010XCB96000 - Portrait of Official Language Communities in Canada94F0011XCB96000 - Portrait of Aboriginal Population in Canada

    A detailed list of tables is included on each CD-ROM. Some tables show comparisons with data from earlier censuses to provide an historical perspective. It should be noted that the Dimension Series was not produced for the 1991 Census.

    Release date: 1999-02-15
Analysis (38)

Analysis (38) (0 to 10 of 38 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100023
    Description:

    Using the 2016 Census and the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, the article highlights key measures of economic well being (low income, food security, ability to deal with unexpected expenses) for First Nations people, Métis and Inuit living in urban areas.

    Release date: 2020-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020006
    Description:

    This paper examines the role of firm characteristics in accounting for the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion in the Canadian business sector between 2002 and 2015. It uses two decomposition methods to analyze the level of and changes in the between-firm average employment earnings dispersion by firm characteristics, such as productivity, globalization status (importing, exporting, foreign ownership), technology intensity, firm size, firm age, industry and geographic region.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020007
    Description:

    The dispersion of earnings among workers may come from multiple sources. It may reflect differences in workers’ characteristics, such as education and experience. It may also be because workers are employed at different firms that pay differently. Recent studies from other countries have found that firms play an important role in explaining earnings disparities among workers, often through the link between productivity and pay. However, there has been no Canadian evidence on the link between the earnings dispersion and firm differences because of a lack of matched employer–employee data. This paper presents developments in the dispersion of individuals’ earnings in Canada and examines the potential of firm characteristics to account for this dispersion and changes in this dispersion in the post-2000 period using the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2020001
    Description:

    This paper reviews alternative measures of income mixing within geographic units and applies them using geographically detailed income data derived from tax records. It highlights the characteristics of these measures, particularly their ease of interpretation and their suitability to decomposition across different levels of analysis, from neighbourhoods to individual apartment buildings. The discussion focuses on three measures: the dissimilarity index, the information theory index and the divergence index (D-index). Particular emphasis is placed on the D-index because it most effectively describes how income distributions at the sub-metropolitan level (e.g., neighbourhoods) differ from distributions at the metropolitan level (i.e., how much income sorting occurs across neighbourhoods). Furthermore, the D-index can consistently measure the contributions of income sorting within neighbourhoods (e.g., across individual apartment buildings) to the degree of income mixing at the neighbourhood and metropolitan scales.

    Release date: 2020-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200002
    Description:

    The routine measurement of population health status indicators like mortality is important to assess progress in the reduction of inequalities. Previous studies of mortality inequalities have relied on area-based measures of socioeconomic indicators. A new series of census-mortality linked datasets has been created in Canada to quantify mortality inequalities based on individual-level data and examine whether these inequalities have changed over time. This study used the 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006, and 2011 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs) with five years of mortality follow-up. It estimated age-standardized mortality rates by sex according to income quintile and highest level of educational attainment categories for the household population aged 25 or older.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019023
    Description:

    In Canada, immigrants represented more than half of the population in the prime working ages with at least a bachelor’s degree in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields of study in 2016. They accounted for three-quarters of engineering and computer science graduates with a master’s or doctorate degree. This paper examines the skill utilization and earnings of employed STEM-educated immigrants by field of study and degree level.

    Release date: 2019-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019016
    Description:

    University graduates generally earn more than community college graduates, both shortly after graduation and for many years thereafter (Frenette 2019). This may partially reflect the fact that university programs are generally longer in duration. Most university students enroll in a four-year bachelor’s degree program, whereas most college students enroll in a one-year certificate program or in a two- or three-year diploma program. Recently, some colleges (mostly situated in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia) have been offering four-year bachelor’s degree programs. Given the emergence of these new offerings, it would be informative for students, parents, education planners and employers to know whether college bachelor’s degree (CBD) programs are associated with similar labour market and educational pathways as university bachelor’s degree (UBD) programs.

    Release date: 2019-09-09

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019029
    Description:

    This infographic examines economic wellbeing for millennials (those between 25 and 34 years old in 2016) and provides a comparison with generation X at the same age (those between 25 and 34 years old in 1999). Information is provided on income, assets, debts and net worth.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019004
    Description:

    The study aims to discuss homelessness in Canada. Using data from the 2016 Census of Population, we shed light on a segment of homelessness by characterising individuals who were staying in a shelter on Census Day in 2016. The study profiles these individuals by geography, age, sex, and marital status. The study also looks more closely at income levels and income sources in order to highlight the differences between residents who live in particular types of shelters as well as the population living in private dwellings.

    Release date: 2019-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019002
    Description:

    Based on the preliminary T1 Family File (T1FF) for the 2017 reference year, this study gives an overview for Canada, the provinces and the territories of income from annual wages, salaries and commissions of T1 tax filers. The paper focusses on some characteristics of this income source and of the wage-earning tax filers.

    Release date: 2019-01-29
Reference (6)

Reference (6) ((6 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 97-563-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following variables: After-tax income, Total income and its components, Income status as well as other related variables from the Income and earnings release.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 97-563-G
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following variables: After-tax income, Total income and its components, Income status as well as other related variables from the Income and earnings release.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1998 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1999 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19980015023
    Description:

    The study of social mobility, between labour market statuses or between income levels, for example, is often based on the analysis of mobility matrices. When comparing these transition matrices, with a view to evaluating behavioural changes, one often forgets that the data derive from a sample survey and are therefore affected by sampling variances. Similarly, it is assumed that the responses collected correspond to the ' true value.'

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1993017
    Description:

    This report presents the results of the May 1993 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) test as they relate to the wealth items, at the individual level and at the family level.

    Release date: 1995-12-30
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