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All (24) (0 to 10 of 24 results)

  • Geographic files and documentation: 16-510-X2017001
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This product contains restored 1971 census enumeration area boundaries for Canada's largest cities. It provides the public with a historical spatial data set to be used for reference, mapping, spatial and time series analysis. The restored boundaries include population and dwelling statistics.

    Release date: 2017-05-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-567-X
    Description:

    The Coverage Technical Report will present the error included in census data that results from persons missed by the 2006 Census or persons enumerated in error. Population coverage errors are one of the most important types of error because they affect not only the accuracy of population counts but also the accuracy of all of the census data describing characteristics of the population universe.

    Release date: 2010-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-002-X20060019254
    Description:

    This article explains how to append census area-level summary data to survey or administrative data. It uses examples from datasets present in Statistics Canada Research Data Centres, but the methods also apply to external datasets. Four examples illustrate common situations faced by researchers: (1) when the survey (or administrative) and census data both contain the same level of geographic identifiers, coded to the same year standard ("vintage") of census geography; (2) when the two files contain geographic identifiers of the same vintage, but at different levels of census geography; (3) when the two files contain data coded to different vintages of census geography; (4) when the survey data are lacking in geographic identifiers, and those identifiers must first be generated from postal codes present on the file. The examples are shown using SAS syntax, but the principles apply to other programming languages or statistical packages.

    Release date: 2006-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20030017596
    Description:

    This paper discusses the measurement problems that affected the Demographic Analysis (DA), a coverage measurement program used for Census 2000.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20030017601
    Description:

    This paper proposes the use of sequential-interval-Poisson (SIP) sampling across many surveys in order to limit the number of times an individual farm is enumerated for a National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) survey.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20020026418
    Description:

    National statistical offices are often called upon to produce statistics for small geographic areas, in addition to their primary responsibility for measuring the condition of the country as a whole and its major subdivisions. This task presents challenges that are different from those faced in statistical programs aiming primarily at national or provincial statistics. This paper examines these challenges and identifies strategies and approaches for the development of programs of small area statistics. The important foundation of a census of population, as well as the primary role of a consistent geographic infrastructure, are emphasized. Potential sources and methods for the production of small area data in the social, economic and environmental fields are examined. Some organizational and dissemination issues are also discussed.

    Release date: 2003-01-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016265
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Several key strategies contributed to the success of the United States' Census 2000. This paper describes the strategy for the Address Building Process that incorporated numerous address lists and updated activities. The Field Interview Process created close to 900,000 jobs that needed to be filled. Two key strategies to achieve this are also described. The Formal Quality Control Process established principles to guide the quality assurance (QA) programs. These programs are presented, as are some of the examples of their implementation. The Coverage Measurement and Correction Process was used to increase census accuracy through the use of statistical methods. The steps taken to ensure Annual Capital Expenditures (ACE) accuracy and quality are described and the preliminary estimates of the undercount are reported.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016266
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The key measure of Census quality is the level of response achieved. In recent censuses around the world, this level has been in the high nineties percentage range. This was also true of the 1991 Census in Britain (98%). However, what was particularly noticeable about this Census was the differential response rate and the difficulty in effectively measuring this rate. The United Kingdom set up the One Number Census program in order to research and develop a more effective methodology to measure and account for under-enumeration in the 2001 Census. The key element in this process is the Census Coverage Survey - a significantly larger and redesigned post-enumeration survey.

    This paper describes the planning and design of the Census Coverage Survey with particular emphasis on the implementation of the proposed field methodology. It also provides a high-level overview of the success of this survey.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0147X
    Description:

    The set of Dissemination Area Reference Maps by Non-tracted Census Agglomeration covers the smaller census agglomerations that are not part of the census tract program. Each map in the set covers one census agglomeration (CA) and shows the boundaries and codes of dissemination areas within that CA. The maps also show the boundaries of census subdivisions (municipalities), as well as urban areas, and representative points for designated places. The maps include background information such as rivers, lakes, railroad tracks and provincial boundaries, and other significant features.There are 173 maps in this set - between one and four maps per census agglomeration.. Some maps include insets to show detail for the congested areas. These insets appear on the main map where possible, but in some cases it appears on a second map sheet. The maps vary in scale and size, the maximum dimensions being approximately 91 cm by 101 cm (36 inches by 40 inches). A reference guide is available (Catalogue No. 92F0146GIE).Dissemination area reference maps are also available for census tract for large urban centres, that is, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations (92F0146XCB, 92F0146XIB, 92F0146XPB), and by census division for areas outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations (92F0148XCB, 92F0148XIB, 92F0148XPB). Together, the three sets of dissemination area maps cover all of Canada.

    Release date: 2002-03-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 21-006-X2001003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this bulletin is to review various responses to "Why are you asking about rural populations?"; to summarize and compare alternative definitions that have been used to delineate the "rural" population within the databases at Statistics Canada; and to offer alternative definitions of "rural" that would be appropriate to each reason for asking about the rural population.

    Release date: 2001-11-19
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 92F0138M2000001
    Description:

    With this working paper, Statistics Canada is releasing 1991 Census data tabulated by a new geographic classification called "census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zones", or MIZ. This classification applies to census subdivisions (municipalities) that lie outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. This part of Canada covers 96% of the country's total land mass and contains 22% of its population, yet up to now we have been limited in our means of differentiating this vast area. The MIZ classification shows the influence of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA) on surrounding census subdivisions as measured by commuting flows based on 1991 Census place of work data. This version of the MIZ classification also incorporates a preliminary version of a north concept that flags census subdivisions according to their location in the north or south of Canada.

    The series of tables presented here show detailed demographic, social and economic characteristics for Canada as a whole, for the six major regions of Canada, and for individual provinces and territories. Within each table, the data are subdivided into five categories: census metropolitan area or census agglomeration, strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ and no MIZ. Within each of these categories, the data are further subdivided into north and south.

    Readers are invited to review and use the data tables to assess whether this combined MIZ and north/south classification of non-CMA/CA areas provides sufficient detail to support data analysis and research. The intent of this MIZ classification is to reveal previously hidden data detail and thereby help users address issues related to this vast geographic area.

    This is the first of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE). The second working paper (no. 2000-2, 92F0138MPE00002) provides background information about the methodology used to delineate the MIZ classification. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Table: 95F0226X1996003
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 97-570-X1991106
    Description:

    This table details population 15 years and over by age groups and sex, showing work activity in 1990, for canada, provinces, territories, federal electoral districts and enumeration areas, 1991 census.

    Release date: 1993-06-01
Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-002-X20060019254
    Description:

    This article explains how to append census area-level summary data to survey or administrative data. It uses examples from datasets present in Statistics Canada Research Data Centres, but the methods also apply to external datasets. Four examples illustrate common situations faced by researchers: (1) when the survey (or administrative) and census data both contain the same level of geographic identifiers, coded to the same year standard ("vintage") of census geography; (2) when the two files contain geographic identifiers of the same vintage, but at different levels of census geography; (3) when the two files contain data coded to different vintages of census geography; (4) when the survey data are lacking in geographic identifiers, and those identifiers must first be generated from postal codes present on the file. The examples are shown using SAS syntax, but the principles apply to other programming languages or statistical packages.

    Release date: 2006-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20030017596
    Description:

    This paper discusses the measurement problems that affected the Demographic Analysis (DA), a coverage measurement program used for Census 2000.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20030017601
    Description:

    This paper proposes the use of sequential-interval-Poisson (SIP) sampling across many surveys in order to limit the number of times an individual farm is enumerated for a National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) survey.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20020026418
    Description:

    National statistical offices are often called upon to produce statistics for small geographic areas, in addition to their primary responsibility for measuring the condition of the country as a whole and its major subdivisions. This task presents challenges that are different from those faced in statistical programs aiming primarily at national or provincial statistics. This paper examines these challenges and identifies strategies and approaches for the development of programs of small area statistics. The important foundation of a census of population, as well as the primary role of a consistent geographic infrastructure, are emphasized. Potential sources and methods for the production of small area data in the social, economic and environmental fields are examined. Some organizational and dissemination issues are also discussed.

    Release date: 2003-01-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016265
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Several key strategies contributed to the success of the United States' Census 2000. This paper describes the strategy for the Address Building Process that incorporated numerous address lists and updated activities. The Field Interview Process created close to 900,000 jobs that needed to be filled. Two key strategies to achieve this are also described. The Formal Quality Control Process established principles to guide the quality assurance (QA) programs. These programs are presented, as are some of the examples of their implementation. The Coverage Measurement and Correction Process was used to increase census accuracy through the use of statistical methods. The steps taken to ensure Annual Capital Expenditures (ACE) accuracy and quality are described and the preliminary estimates of the undercount are reported.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016266
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The key measure of Census quality is the level of response achieved. In recent censuses around the world, this level has been in the high nineties percentage range. This was also true of the 1991 Census in Britain (98%). However, what was particularly noticeable about this Census was the differential response rate and the difficulty in effectively measuring this rate. The United Kingdom set up the One Number Census program in order to research and develop a more effective methodology to measure and account for under-enumeration in the 2001 Census. The key element in this process is the Census Coverage Survey - a significantly larger and redesigned post-enumeration survey.

    This paper describes the planning and design of the Census Coverage Survey with particular emphasis on the implementation of the proposed field methodology. It also provides a high-level overview of the success of this survey.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2001047
    Description:

    This study gives a snapshot of where the larger concentrations of livestock and poultry were at the time of the Census of Agriculture in May 1996.

    Release date: 2001-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 92F0138M2000004
    Description:

    Up to and including the 1996 Census, the enumeration area (EA) served as both the primary collection area and the basic dissemination area. Optimising both the collection and dissemination functions was a difficult undertaking and compromises were made. For the 2001 Census, the new digital cartographic file called the National Geographic Base (NGB) and the block program have made it possible to create separate enumeration areas for data collection and dissemination areas for data dissemination. This working paper describes the design criteria that have been specified for the implementation of the dissemination area (DA). These criteria address the improvements most frequently requested by users such as increased temporal stability, reduced area suppression, intuitive boundaries, compactness and homogeneity. In addition to integrating and reflecting the recommendations from the user community, the dissemination area design incorporates operational factors related to the DA code structure, maximum code size and production timeframes.

    NOTE: This working paper was first released in March 2000 and described the design criteria and their parameters that were being considered for creating the dissemination area (DA) for the 2001 Census. Since that time, the design criteria have been finalised. New information is highlighted as "Updates" in this version of the paper (June 2001). The remainder of the paper is the same as the version released in March 2000.

    Release date: 2000-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 92F0138M2000002
    Description:

    This working paper provides an overview of census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones, or MIZ, their background and the methodology used to define them. The MIZ classification is an approach to better differentiate areas of Canada outside of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA). Census subdivisions that lie outside these areas are classified into one of four zones of influence ranging from "strong" to "no" influence according to the degree of influence that CMA/CAs have on them. The MIZ classification fills a gap in Statistics Canada's geographic framework and promotes data integration since we expect it will be possible to obtain survey data as well as census data based on the same geographic structure. Studies done with a preliminary version of MIZ showed the potential of MIZ to reveal the diversity of non-metropolitan Canada. Based on feedback received on that initial research, this working paper reports on more recent work that has been done to refine the number and data breakpoints for MIZ categories and to examine the additional variables of distances between census subdivisions (CSDs), physical adjacency and a north-south allocation.

    This is the second in a series of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE) that describe a new statistical area classification that includes census metropolitan areas/census agglomerations, MIZ and the North concept. The first working paper (no. 2000-1, 92F0138MPE00001) briefly describes MIZ and provides tables of selected socio-economic characteristics from the 1991 Census tabulated by the MIZ categories. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the North concept and the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 92F0138M2000003
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's interest in a common delineation of the north for statistical analysis purposes evolved from research to devise a classification to further differentiate the largely rural and remote areas that make up 96% of Canada's land area. That research led to the establishment of the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (MIZ) concept. When applied to census subdivisions, the MIZ categories did not work as well in northern areas as in the south. Therefore, the Geography Division set out to determine a north-south divide that would differentiate the north from the south independent of any standard geographic area boundaries.

    This working paper describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada to separate the north from the south, as well as lines marking transition zones on both sides of the north-south line. It also describes the indicators selected to derive the north-south line and makes comparisons to alternative definitions of the north. The resulting classification of the north complements the MIZ classification. Together, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, MIZ and the North form a new Statistical Area Classification (SAC) for Canada.

    Two related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE) provide further details about the MIZ classification. Working paper no. 2000-1 (92F0138MPE00001) briefly describes MIZ and includes tables of selected socio-economic characteristics from the 1991 Census tabulated by the MIZ categories, and working paper no. 2000-2 (92F0138MPE00002) describes the methodology used to define the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03
Reference (9)

Reference (9) ((9 results))

  • Geographic files and documentation: 16-510-X2017001
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This product contains restored 1971 census enumeration area boundaries for Canada's largest cities. It provides the public with a historical spatial data set to be used for reference, mapping, spatial and time series analysis. The restored boundaries include population and dwelling statistics.

    Release date: 2017-05-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-567-X
    Description:

    The Coverage Technical Report will present the error included in census data that results from persons missed by the 2006 Census or persons enumerated in error. Population coverage errors are one of the most important types of error because they affect not only the accuracy of population counts but also the accuracy of all of the census data describing characteristics of the population universe.

    Release date: 2010-03-25

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0147X
    Description:

    The set of Dissemination Area Reference Maps by Non-tracted Census Agglomeration covers the smaller census agglomerations that are not part of the census tract program. Each map in the set covers one census agglomeration (CA) and shows the boundaries and codes of dissemination areas within that CA. The maps also show the boundaries of census subdivisions (municipalities), as well as urban areas, and representative points for designated places. The maps include background information such as rivers, lakes, railroad tracks and provincial boundaries, and other significant features.There are 173 maps in this set - between one and four maps per census agglomeration.. Some maps include insets to show detail for the congested areas. These insets appear on the main map where possible, but in some cases it appears on a second map sheet. The maps vary in scale and size, the maximum dimensions being approximately 91 cm by 101 cm (36 inches by 40 inches). A reference guide is available (Catalogue No. 92F0146GIE).Dissemination area reference maps are also available for census tract for large urban centres, that is, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations (92F0146XCB, 92F0146XIB, 92F0146XPB), and by census division for areas outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations (92F0148XCB, 92F0148XIB, 92F0148XPB). Together, the three sets of dissemination area maps cover all of Canada.

    Release date: 2002-03-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 21-006-X2001003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this bulletin is to review various responses to "Why are you asking about rural populations?"; to summarize and compare alternative definitions that have been used to delineate the "rural" population within the databases at Statistics Canada; and to offer alternative definitions of "rural" that would be appropriate to each reason for asking about the rural population.

    Release date: 2001-11-19

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-374-X
    Description:

    The 1997 Geography Catalogue provides information about the geographic products and services produced by Statistics Canada. It contains short descriptions of the products and services, including information on price, medium and catalogue numbers.

    Release date: 2001-01-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19990015682
    Description:

    The application of dual system estimation (DSE) to matched Census / Post Enumeration Survey (PES) data in order to measure net undercount is well understood (Hogan, 1993). However, this approach has so far not been used to measure net undercount in the UK. The 2001 PES in the UK will use this methodology. This paper presents the general approach to design and estimation for this PES (the 2001 Census Coverage Survey). The estimation combines DSE with standard ratio and regression estimation. A simulation study using census data from the 1991 Census of England and Wales demonstrates that the ratio model is in general more robust than the regression model.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-371-X
    Description:

    This report deals with sampling and weighting, a process whereby certain characteristics are collected and processed for a random sample of dwellings and persons identified in the complete census enumeration. Data for the whole population are then obtained by scaling up the results for the sample to the full population level. The use of sampling may lead to substantial reductions in costs and respondent burden, or alternatively, can allow the scope of a census to be broadened at the same cost.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-353-X
    Description:

    This report deals with age, sex, marital status and common-law status. It is aimed at informing users about the complexity of the data and any difficulties that could affect their use. It explains the theoretical framework and definitions used to gather the data, and describes unusual circumstances that could affect data quality. Moreover, the report touches upon data capture, edit and imputation, and deals with the historical comparability of the data.

    Release date: 1999-04-16

  • Notices and consultations: 92-126-S
    Description:

    This report highlights the results of the geography portion of the 2001 Census consultation process. At the June 1998 federal-provincial conference session on the 2001 Census, geography was described as the "cornerstone" of the census. Based on the submissions received in the past year, many users feel the same way. It is the standard geographic areas that determine the framework in which the data will be released. It is the users, through the consultation process, who influence the changes to the standard geographic areas that are recommended for each census.

    Release date: 1999-03-31
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