Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (39)

All (39) (0 to 10 of 39 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 72-211-X2018001
    Description:

    Data on investment income, Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contributions and charitable donations are derived from income tax returns.The data for the products associated with this release are derived from an early version of the T1 file that Statistics Canada receives from Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

    Release date: 2018-02-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 72-211-X
    Description:

    Data on investment income, Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contributions and charitable donations are derived from income tax returns.The data for the products associated with this release are derived from an early version of the T1 file that Statistics Canada receives from Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

    Release date: 2018-02-14

  • Table: 98-400-X2016103
    Description:

    This table presents household contributions to registered savings accounts and selected household characteristics for private households of Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    Release date: 2017-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017071
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents the characteristics of families with children under the age of 18 who hold registered education savings plan (RESP) investments. The article also examines the relationship between holding an RESP account at age 15 and postsecondary enrolment between the ages of 19 and 27. The data are drawn from the 1999 and 2012 Survey of Financial Security and from the Youth in Transition Survey, Cohort A, linked to the T1 Family File. Postsecondary enrolment is derived from education deductions and tuition credits in the tax data.

    Release date: 2017-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017392
    Description:

    The registered education savings plan (RESP) savings vehicle is designed to encourage parents of school-age children to save for their children’s postsecondary education through tax sheltered earnings on contributions, as well as through additional contributions from the federal government. No recent evidence exists on the characteristics of RESP holders, and little exists on the association between having an RESP and enrolling in postsecondary education.

    This study makes three contributions to the literature. First, it documents differences in RESP holdings by family income and how these have evolved over time. Second, it decomposes these differences (particularly between the top and bottom quintiles of family income) into portions that are related to differences in key determinants of RESP participation (e.g., family wealth and parental education). And, third, it examines the relationship between having an RESP account and attending a postsecondary institution.

    Release date: 2017-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017391
    Description:

    This paper assesses the extent to which education affects how Canadians save and accumulate wealth for retirement. The paper makes three contributions. First, a descriptive analysis is presented of differences in savings and home values across individuals based on their levels of educational attainment. To this end, new datasets that link survey respondents from the 1991 and 2006 censuses of Canada to their administrative tax records are used. These data provide a unique opportunity to jointly observe education, savings, home values, and a plethora of other factors of relevance. Second, the causal effect of high school completion on savings rates in tax-preferred accounts is estimated, exploiting compulsory schooling reforms in the identification. Third, building on a recent study by Messacar (2015), education is also found to affect how individuals re-optimize their savings rates in response to an automatic change in pension wealth accumulation. The implications of this study’s findings for the “nudge paradigm” in behavioural economics are discussed.

    Release date: 2017-03-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 72-211-X2017001
    Description:

    Data on investment income, Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contributions and charitable donations are derived from income tax returns.The data for the products associated with this release are derived from an early version of the T1 file that Statistics Canada receives from Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016064
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents an overview of recent trends in registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) use among Canadian taxfilers aged 25 to 54, from 2000 to 2013. The analysis centres on differences in RRSP contribution and withdrawal behaviour across income groups, and around the time that the tax free savings account (TFSA) was introduced.

    Release date: 2017-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015371
    Description:

    This paper investigates whether registered pension plans (RPPs) help households prepare financially for retirement or simply substitute for other forms of private saving. This issue is addressed using a panel of 1.8 million Canadian households, from 1991 to 2010, which appear in the Longitudinal Administrative Databank. The analysis controls for correlations in savings across accounts due to unobserved tastes for saving by exploiting the fact that employer contribution rates increase discontinuously on earnings above the average industrial wage, a unique feature of occupational pensions in Canada, the effect being estimated in a Regression Kink Design.

    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 11F0027M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Economic Analysis Research Paper Series provides the circulation of research conducted by the staff of National Accounts and Analytical Studies, visiting fellows and academic associates. The research paper series is meant to stimulate discussion on a range of topics including the impact of the new economy; productivity issues; firm profitability; technology usage; the effect of financing on firm growth; depreciation functions; the use of satellite accounts; savings rates; leasing; firm dynamics; hedonic estimations; diversification patterns; investment patterns; the differences in the performance of small and large, or domestic and multinational firms; and purchasing power parity estimates. Readers of the series are encouraged to contact the authors with comments, criticisms and suggestions.

    The primary distribution medium for the papers is the Internet. These papers can be downloaded from the Internet at www.statcan.gc.ca for free. Papers in the series are distributed to Statistics Canada Regional Offices and provincial statistical focal points.

    All papers in the Economic Analysis Series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a government statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

    The papers in the series often include results derived from multivariate analysis or other statistical techniques. It should be recognized that the results of these analyses are subject to uncertainty in the reported estimates.

    The level of uncertainty will depend on several factors: the nature of the functional form used in the multivariate analysis; the type of econometric technique employed; the appropriateness of the statistical assumptions embedded in the model or technique; the comprehensiveness of the variables included in the analysis; and the accuracy of the data that are utilized. The peer group review process is meant to ensure that the papers in the series have followed accepted standards to minimize problems in each of these areas.

    Release date: 2015-07-24
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 98-400-X2016103
    Description:

    This table presents household contributions to registered savings accounts and selected household characteristics for private households of Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    Release date: 2017-09-13

  • Table: 13-019-X
    Description:

    These data tables provide quarterly information on Canada's National Income and Expenditure Accounts (NIEA), 1961-2012. It contains seasonally adjusted data on gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure, saving and investment, borrowing and lending of each of four broad sectors of the economy: (i) persons and unincorporated businesses, (ii) corporate and government business enterprises, (iii) governments and (iv) non-residents. Information is also provided for selected subsectors. The tables include data beginning in 1961, and is no longer being released.

    Release date: 2012-08-31

  • Public use microdata: 81M0017X
    Description:

    The Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), conducted and developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, provides detailed information about approaches to educational planning in Canada. The survey provides information on how parents are involved with their children's education, their hopes and plans for their children's postsecondary education, how they expect to pay for their children's postsecondary education and their current education savings.

    Release date: 2005-02-03
Analysis (27)

Analysis (27) (0 to 10 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017071
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents the characteristics of families with children under the age of 18 who hold registered education savings plan (RESP) investments. The article also examines the relationship between holding an RESP account at age 15 and postsecondary enrolment between the ages of 19 and 27. The data are drawn from the 1999 and 2012 Survey of Financial Security and from the Youth in Transition Survey, Cohort A, linked to the T1 Family File. Postsecondary enrolment is derived from education deductions and tuition credits in the tax data.

    Release date: 2017-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017392
    Description:

    The registered education savings plan (RESP) savings vehicle is designed to encourage parents of school-age children to save for their children’s postsecondary education through tax sheltered earnings on contributions, as well as through additional contributions from the federal government. No recent evidence exists on the characteristics of RESP holders, and little exists on the association between having an RESP and enrolling in postsecondary education.

    This study makes three contributions to the literature. First, it documents differences in RESP holdings by family income and how these have evolved over time. Second, it decomposes these differences (particularly between the top and bottom quintiles of family income) into portions that are related to differences in key determinants of RESP participation (e.g., family wealth and parental education). And, third, it examines the relationship between having an RESP account and attending a postsecondary institution.

    Release date: 2017-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017391
    Description:

    This paper assesses the extent to which education affects how Canadians save and accumulate wealth for retirement. The paper makes three contributions. First, a descriptive analysis is presented of differences in savings and home values across individuals based on their levels of educational attainment. To this end, new datasets that link survey respondents from the 1991 and 2006 censuses of Canada to their administrative tax records are used. These data provide a unique opportunity to jointly observe education, savings, home values, and a plethora of other factors of relevance. Second, the causal effect of high school completion on savings rates in tax-preferred accounts is estimated, exploiting compulsory schooling reforms in the identification. Third, building on a recent study by Messacar (2015), education is also found to affect how individuals re-optimize their savings rates in response to an automatic change in pension wealth accumulation. The implications of this study’s findings for the “nudge paradigm” in behavioural economics are discussed.

    Release date: 2017-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016064
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents an overview of recent trends in registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) use among Canadian taxfilers aged 25 to 54, from 2000 to 2013. The analysis centres on differences in RRSP contribution and withdrawal behaviour across income groups, and around the time that the tax free savings account (TFSA) was introduced.

    Release date: 2017-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015371
    Description:

    This paper investigates whether registered pension plans (RPPs) help households prepare financially for retirement or simply substitute for other forms of private saving. This issue is addressed using a panel of 1.8 million Canadian households, from 1991 to 2010, which appear in the Longitudinal Administrative Databank. The analysis controls for correlations in savings across accounts due to unobserved tastes for saving by exploiting the fact that employer contribution rates increase discontinuously on earnings above the average industrial wage, a unique feature of occupational pensions in Canada, the effect being estimated in a Regression Kink Design.

    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 11F0027M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Economic Analysis Research Paper Series provides the circulation of research conducted by the staff of National Accounts and Analytical Studies, visiting fellows and academic associates. The research paper series is meant to stimulate discussion on a range of topics including the impact of the new economy; productivity issues; firm profitability; technology usage; the effect of financing on firm growth; depreciation functions; the use of satellite accounts; savings rates; leasing; firm dynamics; hedonic estimations; diversification patterns; investment patterns; the differences in the performance of small and large, or domestic and multinational firms; and purchasing power parity estimates. Readers of the series are encouraged to contact the authors with comments, criticisms and suggestions.

    The primary distribution medium for the papers is the Internet. These papers can be downloaded from the Internet at www.statcan.gc.ca for free. Papers in the series are distributed to Statistics Canada Regional Offices and provincial statistical focal points.

    All papers in the Economic Analysis Series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a government statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

    The papers in the series often include results derived from multivariate analysis or other statistical techniques. It should be recognized that the results of these analyses are subject to uncertainty in the reported estimates.

    The level of uncertainty will depend on several factors: the nature of the functional form used in the multivariate analysis; the type of econometric technique employed; the appropriateness of the statistical assumptions embedded in the model or technique; the comprehensiveness of the variables included in the analysis; and the accuracy of the data that are utilized. The peer group review process is meant to ensure that the papers in the series have followed accepted standards to minimize problems in each of these areas.

    Release date: 2015-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014093
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the composition of Canadian and United States gross national saving for a period spanning more than 80 years, using time series from the Bureau of Economic Analysis in the United States and a newly created dataset for Canada. The paper tracks short-term, year-to-year fluctuations, cyclical fluctuations and long-term compositional changes. It illustrates a substantial degree of national saving reallocation across sectors, annually and across business cycles. The national saving rate is more stable than sector saving rates, implying that sectoral changes have been largely offsetting.

    Release date: 2014-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2013029
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Population aging and the recent global financial crisis underscore the importance of the discussions of the adequacy of retirement preparation in Canada and the soundness of the Canadian retirement income system. The focus of this study is to examine whether the accumulated private savings of Canadian households is adequate for their retirement, given their expected entitlement to public and private pension when they retire.

    Release date: 2013-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012076
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents a first Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) compiled for Canada. Using data for the year 2000, the authors construct a SAM for the national economy. A SAM extends the National Accounts to allow for a fuller understanding of the socioeconomic system that captures the interdependencies of institutional groups. This paper presents a macro SAM with three micro extensions. The first application expands the household sector through integration with household surveys, showing incomes, outlays, savings, and fiscal transfers of the sector by income quintile and other household attributes. For this exercise, the authors use a market-transaction approach, which introduces a new perspective on household savings that diverges from national accounting concepts and the Canadian System of National Accounts sub-control totals. The second application expands employment income by age, gender, educational attainment, and industry of employment. The third application shows product taxes by type of expenditure and type of tax.

    Release date: 2012-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100111432
    Description:

    The value of education and the benefits that flow from it are substantial for many Canadian families. Previous research has found that Canadian parents are strongly committed to their children's postsecondary education. However, many parents of children under the age of 18 are confronted with a number of competing savings priorities. Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines who saves for postsecondary education and how they do so.

    Release date: 2011-05-19
Reference (9)

Reference (9) ((9 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 72-211-X2018001
    Description:

    Data on investment income, Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contributions and charitable donations are derived from income tax returns.The data for the products associated with this release are derived from an early version of the T1 file that Statistics Canada receives from Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

    Release date: 2018-02-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 72-211-X
    Description:

    Data on investment income, Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contributions and charitable donations are derived from income tax returns.The data for the products associated with this release are derived from an early version of the T1 file that Statistics Canada receives from Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

    Release date: 2018-02-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 72-211-X2017001
    Description:

    Data on investment income, Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contributions and charitable donations are derived from income tax returns.The data for the products associated with this release are derived from an early version of the T1 file that Statistics Canada receives from Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201500314153
    Description:

    The Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA) is a source of invaluable information for business, governments and citizens. These accounts provide users with important insights into the inner-workings of the economy, current economic trends and interactions between the various sectors of the economy. In order for these accounts to remain relevant, the underlying concepts, methods, classification systems and data sources need to be periodically updated.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-605-X201400111911
    Description:

    Statistical revisions are carried out regularly in the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) in order to incorporate the most current information from censuses, annual surveys, administrative statistics, public accounts, etc., and to implement improved estimation methods.

    Release date: 2014-02-28

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201400111912
    Description:

    Statistical revisions are regularly applied to the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts in order to incorporate the most current information from censuses, annual surveys, administrative statistics, public accounts, etc., and to implement improved estimation methods. Statistics Canada also conducts more comprehensive revisions to the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts, which generally reflect new concepts, accounting treatments or methods.

    Release date: 2014-02-28

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201300311816
    Description:

    Statistical revisions are regularly applied to the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts in order to incorporate the most current information from censuses, annual surveys, administrative statistics, public accounts, etc., and to implement improved estimation methods. Statistics Canada also conducts more comprehensive revisions to the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts, which generally reflect new concepts, accounting treatments or methods. This paper outlines the scheduled revisions planned for 2013 to 2015.

    Release date: 2013-05-21

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201200111671
    Description:

    Macroeconomic data for Canada, including Canada's National Accounts (gross domestic product (GDP), saving and net worth), Balance of International Payments (current and capital account surplus or deficit and International Investment Position) and Government Financial Statistics (government deficit and debt) are based on international standards. These international standards are set on a coordinated basis by international organizations including the United Nations, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and Eurostat, with input from experts around the world. Canada has always played an important role in the development and updating of these standards as they have transformed from the crude guidelines of the early to mid 20th century to the fully articulated standards that exist today.

    The purpose of this document is to introduce a new presentation of the quarterly National Accounts (Income and Expenditure Accounts, Financial Flow Accounts and National Balance Sheet Accounts) that will be published with the conversion of the Canadian National Accounts to the latest international standard - System of National Accounts 2008.

    Release date: 2012-05-30

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201000111130
    Description:

    The majority of Canada's national, provincial and territorial macroeconomic indicators originate from the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA). These indicators include such things as gross domestic product, net worth, savings, personal disposable income and government debt. Statistics Canada is launching a project that will make key changes to these macroeconomic indicators. The changes introduced by this project are outlined in this paper.

    Release date: 2010-05-05
Date modified: