Investment Income, RRSP Contributions and Charitable Donations Technical Reference Guide
T1 Family File, Preliminary Estimates, 2016

Release date: February 14, 2018

Data Source

The financial and donors data sets are derived from income tax returns. For the most part, tax returns were filed in the spring of the year following the reference year. For example, for the 2016 tax year, most income tax returns were filed by April 30, 2017.

Demographic characteristics such as age are given as of December 31 of the tax year. Income information is for the calendar year under review.

The data for the products associated with this release are derived from an early version of a file that Statistics Canada receives from Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The file benefits from timeliness, but loses some accuracy because of it. This earlier tax file, often referred to as the T1 preliminary file, contains about 97% of the records on the CRA file received four to five months later.

Data Frequency

Data are updated on an annual basis.

Data Quality

a) Number of Canadian Tax Filers

The data used are direct counts from T1 preliminary tax file. For the 2016 tax year, 26.4 million Canadians or 72.1% filed tax returns.

Table A
Number of Canadian Tax Filers
Table summary
This table displays the results of Number of Canadian Tax Filers. The information is grouped by Tax year (appearing as row headers), Number of Tax Filers ('000), Date of Population Estimate, Population ('000) and Coverage (%) (appearing as column headers).
Tax year Number of Tax Filers ('000) Date of Population Estimate Population ('000) Coverage (%)
1991 18,786 01-Apr-92 28,270 66.5%
1992 19,267 01-Apr-93 28,601 67.4%
1993 19,882 01-Apr-94 28,907 68.8%
1994 20,184 01-Apr-95 29,212 69.1%
1995 20,536 01-Apr-96 29,514 69.6%
1996 20,772 01-Apr-97 29,818 69.7%
1997 21,113 01-Apr-98 30,080 70.2%
1998 21,431 01-Apr-99 30,315 70.7%
1999 21,893 01-Apr-00 30,594 71.6%
2000 22,249 01-Apr-01 30,911 72.0%
2001 22,804 01-Apr-02 31,252 73.0%
2002 22,968 01-Apr-03 31,548 72.8%
2003 23,268 01-Apr-04 31,846 73.1%
2004 23,625 01-Apr-05 32,143 73.5%
2005 23,952 01-Apr-06 32,471 73.8%
2006 24,258 01-Apr-07 32,818 73.9%
2007 24,624 01-Apr-08 33,191 74.2%
2008 24,987 01-Apr-09 33,604 74.4%
2009* 24,321 01-Apr-10 34,002 71.5%
2010* 24,495 01-Apr-11 34,368 71.3%
2011* 24,842 01-Apr-12 34,754 71.5%
2012* 25,160 01-Apr-13 35,025 71.8%
2013* 25,483 01-Apr-14 35,416 71.9%
2014* 25,922 01-Apr-15 35,755 72.5%
2015* 26,187 01-Apr-16 36,147 72.4%
2016* 26,350 01-Apr-17 36,561 72.1%

b) Elderly population

Some elderly Canadians receiving only Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement do not file because they have low or no taxable income. However, with the introduction of the Federal Sales Tax (FST) Credit in 1986 and the Goods and Services Tax (GST) Credit in 1990, the percentage of the elderly population filing tax returns has increased.

c) Low Income

Persons below a certain level of income with low income have no tax liability and are not required to file tax returns. However, with the introduction of the Child Tax Credit in 1978, the Federal Sales Tax (FST) Credit in 1986, the Goods and Services Tax (GST) Credit in 1990, and the Child Tax Benefits in 1993, persons with low income are still likely to file tax returns in order to apply for these credits.

Confidentiality and Rounding

Over the years since its creation, the T1 Family File (T1FF) has become known as a reliable, annual source for income. To protect the confidentiality of Canadians, all data are subject to the confidentiality procedures of rounding and suppression.

All counts are rounded. Rounding may increase, decrease, or cause no change to counts. Rounding can affect the results obtained from calculations. For example, when calculating percentages from rounded data, results may be distorted as both the numerator and denominator have been rounded. The distortion can be greatest with small numbers.

Starting with the 2007 data, all aggregate amounts are rounded to the nearest $5,000 dollars. Also as of 2007, median incomes in the data tables are rounded to the nearest ten dollars (prior to 2007 they were rounded to the nearest hundred dollars).

Since 1990, data cells represent counts of 15 or greater, and are rounded to a base of 10. For example, a cell count of 15 would be rounded to 20 and a cell count of 24 would be rounded to 20.

Note: Counts represent the number of persons. Reported amounts are aggregate dollar amounts reported.

In the data tables:

Suppressed Data

To maintain confidentiality, data cells have been suppressed whenever:

Suppressed data may occur:

a) Within one area:

b) Between areas:

RRSP Contributors

This data set provides information on tax filers who contributed to a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) during the tax year under review

Starting in 2013, tax filers who contributed to a Pooled registered pension plan (PRPP) are also included.

The content of the data set is as follows:

Table R-01: Summary (CANSIM 111-0039)
Total number of tax filers
Number of RRSP contributors
Average age of RRSP contributors
Median employment income of RRSP contributors
75th percentile of employment income of RRSP contributors
Amount of RRSP dollars reported (in thousands of dollars)
Median RRSP contribution

Table R-02: Age groups (CANSIM 111-0039)
Total number of tax filers
Total number of RRSP contributors
Percent of contributors 0 to 24 years of age
Percent of contributors 25 to 34 years of age
Percent of contributors 35 to 44 years of age
Percent of contributors 45 to 54 years of age
Percent of contributors 55 to 64 years of age
Percent of contributors 65+ years of age
Total amount of RRSP dollars reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of contributions reported by age group 0 to 24
Percent of contributions reported by age group 25 to 34
Percent of contributions reported by age group 35 to 44
Percent of contributions reported by age group 45 to 54
Percent of contributions reported by age group 55 to 64
Percent of contributions reported by age group 65+

Table R-03: Sex (CANSIM 111-0039)
Total number of tax filers
Percent of tax filers who are male
Percent of tax filers who are female
Total number of RRSP Contributors
Percent of contributors who are male
Percent of contributors who are female
Total amount of RRSP dollars reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of contributions reported by males
Percent of contributions reported by females
Median RRSP contribution of all contributors
Median RRSP contribution of males
Median RRSP contribution of females

Table R-04: Income groups (CANSIM 111-0039)
Total number of tax filers
Total number of RRSP contributors
Percent of RRSP contributors with total income less than $20,000
Percent of RRSP contributors with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of RRSP contributors with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of RRSP contributors with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of RRSP contributors with total income $80,000+
Total amount of RRSP dollars reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of total RRSP amount reported by contributors with total income less than $20,000
Percent of total RRSP amount reported by contributors with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of total RRSP amount reported by contributors with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of total RRSP amount reported by contributors with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of total RRSP amount reported by contributors with total income $80,000+

RRSP Contribution Limits (Room)

The Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) Room data set was created to provide information on the RRSP contribution limit (RRSP Room) available. This product can be used in conjunction with the RRSP data set which concentrates on the RRSP contributors.

In 1989, the legislation dictated that contribution limits for persons not contributing to a registered pension plan (RPP) or a Deferred Profit Sharing Plan (DPSP) was 20% of earned income to a maximum of $7,500. The limit for RPP and DPSP members was 20% of earned income to a maximum of $3,500 less the amount contributed by the employee to the RPP or DPSP.

Further amendments to the Income Tax Act relative to RRSPs, taking effect January 1, 1991, were intended to make RRSP contribution limits more equitable. The RRSP contribution limit was set at 18% of earned income for the previous tax year, to a set maximum minus the Pension Adjustment (PA). The PA represents the calculated value of the pension accrued through an RPP or a DPSP in the previous tax year.

Starting in 2013, Pooled registered pension plan (PRPP) contributions are included.

Total RRSP Room represents the deduction limit that Canadians can claim with respect to contributions made to RRSPs/ PRPPs. It does not include income eligible for transfers, such as retiring allowances and severance pay that may be rolled over into RRSPs. The sum of the deduction limit and rollovers represents the maximum amount that can be claimed as a deduction on line 208 of the income tax return.

Table B
New Room – Calculation of RRSP/PRPP Contribution Limits
Table summary
This table displays the results of New Room – Calculation of RRSP/PRPP Contribution Limits. The information is grouped by Earned income in tax year (appearing as row headers), New room, Unused room and Total room
(for tax year+1) (appearing as column headers).
Earned income
in tax year
New room Unused room Total room
(for tax year+1)
1991 For 1992 pre1991 = 0 New room only
1992 For 1993 1991 to 1992 Unused room + new room
1993 For 1994 1991 to 1993 Unused room + new room
1994 For 1995 1991 to 1994 Unused room + new room
1995 For 1996 1991 to 1995 Unused room + new room
1996 For 1997 1991 to 1996 Unused room + new room
1997 For 1998 1991 to 1997 Unused room + new room
1998 For 1999 1991 to 1998 Unused room + new room
1999 For 2000 1991 to 1999 Unused room + new room
2000 For 2001 1991 to 2000 Unused room + new room
2001 For 2002 1991 to 2001 Unused room + new room
2002 For 2003 1991 to 2002 Unused room + new room
2003 For 2004 1991 to 2003 Unused room + new room
2004 For 2005 1991 to 2004 Unused room + new room
2005 For 2006 1991 to 2005 Unused room + new room
2006 For 2007 1991 to 2006 Unused room + new room
2007 For 2008 1991 to 2007 Unused room + new room
2008 For 2009 1991 to 2008 Unused room + new room
2009 For 2010 1991 to 2009 Unused room + new room
2010 For 2011 1991 to 2010 Unused room + new room
2011 For 2012 1991 to 2011 Unused room + new room
2012 For 2013 1991 to 2012 Unused room + new room
2013 For 2014 1991 to 2013 Unused room + new room
2014 For 2015 1991 to 2014 Unused room + new room
2015 For 2016 1991 to 2015 Unused room + new room
2016 For 2017 1991 to 2016 Unused room + new room

For 1990, maximum contributions are:

For 1991 to 2016:

New room = 18% of earned income - PA - PSPA

Percentage of earned income to a maximum of
$11,500 for 1991
$12,500 for 1992 and 1993
$13,500 for 1994
$14,500 for 1995
$13,500 for 1996
$13,500 for 1997
$13,500 for 1998
$13,500 for 1999
$13,500 for 2000
$13,500 for 2001
$13,500 for 2002
$14,500 for 2003
$15,500 for 2004
$16,500 for 2005
$18,000 for 2006
$19,000 for 2007
$20,000 for 2008
$21,000 for 2009
$22,000 for 2010
$22,450 for 2011
$22,970 for 2012
$23,820 for 2013
$24,270 for 2014
$24,930 for 2015
$25,370 for 2016

Where PA = Pension Adjustment, and PSPA = Past Service Pension Adjustment

Prior to tax year 2000 (Room 2001):
Total Room (for tax year+1) = Unused Room (from 1991 forward) + New Room

For tax years 2000 to 2016 (Room 2001 to Room 2017):
Total Room (for tax year+1) = Unused Room accumulated since 1991 + (18% of earned income – Pension adjustment) – Current tax year contributions excluding rollovers

Data source for RRSP Room

Prior to the release of data for tax year 2000, the RRSP Room data were derived from a file received annually from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA, formerly Canada Customs and Revenue Agency). CRA generated the data from an administrative system designed in response to changes to the Income Tax Act with respect to Registered Retirement Savings Plans, changes that took effect January 1, 1991.

The system records information for each tax filer with "earned income" (income used to determine the RRSP deduction limit). The information includes each year's earned income, new room amounts and unused room amounts carried forward.

Starting with the 2001 ROOM (2000 tax data), the amount of RRSP Room is calculated from other variables on the preliminary file, variables which were previously unavailable.

Starting in 2013, Pooled registered pension plan (PRPP) contributions are included.

This year’s release of the RRSP Room data is based on 2016 income tax returns. Contributions towards these limits can be made up to February 2018, to be reported on the 2017 tax returns. The mailing address at the time of filing is the basis for the geographic information in the tables.

The content of the data set is as follows:

Table RR-01: Persons with room (CANSIM 111-0040)

Amount of Room dollars reported (in thousands of $)
Amount of Unused Room dollars reported (in thousands of $)
Amount of New Room dollars reported (in thousands of $)
Number of tax filers with Room
Number of tax filers with Unused Room
Number of tax filers with New Room

Table RR-02: Characteristics of persons with new room (CANSIM 111-0040)

Number of tax filers with New Room
Average Age of tax filers with New Room
Percentage Female tax filers with New Room
Median Earned Income of tax filers with New Room
Average New Room
Percentage of tax filers with New Room between $500 and $2,399
Percentage of tax filers with New Room between $2,400 and $4,699
Percentage of tax filers with New Room between $4,700 and $7,799
Percentage of tax filers with New Room between $7,800 and $12,999
Percentage of tax filers with New Room greater than $13,000

Canadian Savers

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T1 Line 121 – Interest and other investment income

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This data set provides information on tax filers who have been classified as savers.

Savers are defined as tax filers who reported interest and investment income on T1 line 121, but no dividend income on T1 line 120 of the personal income tax return.

Interest and investment income sources would include interest from Canada Savings bonds, bank accounts, treasury bills, investment certificates, term deposits, earnings on life insurance policies as well as foreign interest and dividend income.

Tax filers reporting Canadian dividend income would not be counted as savers, but would be classified as investors.

Dividend income would include dividends from taxable Canadian corporations (as stocks or mutual funds), but not dividends from foreign investments.

The content of the data set is as follows:

Table CS-01: Summary (CANSIM 111-0036)
Total number of tax filers
Number of savers
Average age of savers
Median total income of savers
Total amount of interest dollars reported (in thousands of dollars)
Median of interest dollars

Table CS-02: Age groups (CANSIM 111-0036)
Total number of tax filers
Total number of savers
Percent of savers 0-24 years of age
Percent of savers 25-34 years of age
Percent of savers 35-44 years of age
Percent of savers 45-54 years of age
Percent of savers 55-64 years of age
Percent of savers 65+ years of age
Total amount of interest income dollars reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of interest income reported by age group 0-24
Percent of interest income reported by age group 25-34
Percent of interest income reported by age group 35-44
Percent of interest income reported by age group 45-54
Percent of interest income reported by age group 55-64
Percent of interest income reported by age group 65+

Table CS-03: Sex (CANSIM 111-0036)
Total number of tax filers
Percent of tax filers who are male
Percent of tax filers who are female
Total number of savers
Percent of savers who are male
Percent of savers who are female
Total amount of interest income reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of interest income reported by males
Percent of interest income reported by females
Median interest income of all savers
CMedian interest income of all male savers
Median interest income of all female savers

Table CS-04: Income groups (CANSIM 111-0036)
Total number of tax filers
Total number of savers
Percent of savers with total income less than $20,000
Percent of savers with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of savers with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of savers with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of savers with total income $80,000+
Total amount of interest income reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of interest income reported by savers with total income less than $20,000
Percent of interest income reported by savers with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of interest income reported by savers with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of interest income reported by savers with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of interest income reported by savers with total income $80,000+

Canadian Investors

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T1 Line 120 – Taxable amount of dividends from taxable Canadian corporations

T1 Line 121 – Interest and other investment income

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This data set provides information on tax filers classified as investors.

Investors include tax filers who reported dividend income on T1 line 120 of their personal tax return. They may or may not have also reported interest and other investment income on T1 line 121. When income is also reported on T1 line 121, that amount is added to the amount of dividend income received, and the sum becomes the investment income of the investor.

The content of the data set is as follows:

Table CI-01: Summary (CANSIM 111-0037)
Total number of tax filers
Number of investors
Average age of investors
Median total income of investors
Amount of investment dollars (in thousands of dollars)
Percentage of the investment income derived from dividends
Median investment income

Table CI-02: Age groups (CANSIM 111-0037)
Total number of tax filers
Total number of investors
Percent of investors 0-24 years of age
Percent of investors 25-34 years of age
Percent of investors 35-44 years of age
Percent of investors 45-54 years of age
Percent of investors 55-64 years of age
Percent of investors 65+ years of age
Total amount of investment income dollars reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of investment income reported by age group 0-24
Percent of investment income reported by age group 25-34
Percent of investment income reported by age group 35-44
Percent of investment income reported by age group 45-54
Percent of investment income reported by age group 55-64
Percent of investment income reported by age group 65+

Table CI-03: Sex (CANSIM 111-0037)
Total number of tax filers
Percent of tax filers who are male
Percent of tax filers who are female
Total number of investors
Percent of investors who are male
Percent of investors who are female
Total amount of investment income reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of investment income reported by males
Percent of investment income reported by females
Median investment income of all investors
Median investment income of all male investors
Median investment income of all female investors

Table CI-04: Income groups (CANSIM 111-0037)
Total number of tax filers
Total number of investors
Percent of investors with total income less than $20,000
Percent of investors with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of investors with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of investors with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of investors with total income $80,000+
Total amount of investment income reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of investment income reported by investors with total income less than $20,000
Percent of investment income reported by investors with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of investment income reported by investors with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of investment income reported by investors with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of investment income reported by investors with total income $80,000+

Canadian Investment Income

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T1 Line 120 – Taxable amount of dividends from taxable Canadian corporations

T1 Line 121 – Interest and other investment income

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This data set provides information on tax filers who reported dividend income on T1 line 120 of the tax return, or interest and other investment income on T1 line 121, or both. These tax filers include those designated as savers and those designated as investors in two other data sets available: Canadian Savers and Canadian Investors. In this data set, investment income includes both interest and dividends.

Dividend income includes dividends from taxable Canadian corporations (as stocks or mutual funds).

Interest and other investment income sources include interest from Canada Savings bonds, bank accounts, treasury bills, investment certificates, term deposits, earnings on life insurance policies as well as foreign interest and dividend income.

The content of the data set is as follows:

Table CII-01: Summary (CANSIM 111-0038)
Total number of tax filers
Number of tax filers with investment income
Average age of tax filers with investment income
Median total income of tax filers with investment income
Reported investment income dollars for all tax filers with investment income (in thousands of dollars)
Median investment income for all tax filers with investment income

Table CII-02: Age groups (CANSIM 111-0038)
Total number of tax filers
Total number of receivers of investment income
Percent of receivers of investment income 0-24 years of age
Percent of receivers of investment income 25-34 years of age
Percent of receivers of investment income 35-44 years of age
Percent of receivers of investment income 45-54 years of age
Percent of receivers of investment income 55-64 years of age
Percent of receivers of investment income 65+ years of age
Total amount of investment income dollars reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of investment income reported by age group 0-24
Percent of investment income reported by age group 25-34
Percent of investment income reported by age group 35-44
Percent of investment income reported by age group 45-54
Percent of investment income reported by age group 55-64
Percent of investment income reported by age group 65+

Table CII-03: Sex (CANSIM 111-0038)
Total number of tax filers
Percent of tax filers who are male
Percent of tax filers who are female
Total number of receivers of investment income
Percent of receivers of investment income who are male
Percent of receivers of investment income who are female
Total amount of investment income reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of investment income reported by males
Percent of investment income reported by females
Median investment income of all receivers of investment income
Median investment income of all male receivers of investment income
Median investment income of all female receivers of investment income

Table CII-04: Income groups (CANSIM 111-0038)
Total number of tax filers
Total number of receivers of investment income
Percent of receivers of investment income with total income less than $20,000
Percent of receivers of investment income with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of receivers of investment income with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of receivers of investment income with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of receivers of investment income with total income $80,000+
Total amount of investment income reported (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of investment income reported by receivers of investment income with total income less than $20,000
Percent of investment income reported by receivers of investment income with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of investment income reported by receivers of investment income with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of investment income reported by receivers of investment income with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of investment income reported by receivers of investment income with total income $80,000+

Canadian Capital Gains

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T1 Line 127 – Taxable amount of capital gains

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This data set provides information on tax filers who reported capital gains during the tax year under review.

Line 127 of the T1 income tax return contains the amount of taxable capital gains reported by Canadians; this value is half the actual capital gains received. The information in this data set reflects the total capital gains received; amounts reported have been grossed up to reflect this total.

The content of the data set is as follows:

Table CG-01 (CANSIM 111-0042)
Total number of tax filers
Number of tax filers reporting capital gains
Percent of tax filers reporting capital gains who had a total income under $20,000
Percent of tax filers reporting capital gains who had a total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of tax filers reporting capital gains who had a total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of tax filers reporting capital gains who had a total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of tax filers reporting capital gains who had a total income of $80,000+
Total value of capital gains (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of capital gains reported by tax filers with a total income under $20,000
Percent of capital gains reported by tax filers with a total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of capital gains reported by tax filers with a total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of capital gains reported by tax filers with a total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of capital gains reported by tax filers with a total income of $80,000+

Canadian Tax Filers

This data set provides a demographic and income profile of Canadians who filed a personal tax return in the reference year, according to the T1 preliminary file.

The content of the data set is as follows:

Table CT-01: Summary (CANSIM 111-0041)
Number of tax filers
Percent of tax filers 0-24 years of age
Percent of tax filers 25-34 years of age
Percent of tax filers 35-44 years of age
Percent of tax filers 45-54 years of age
Percent of tax filers 55-64 years of age
Percent of tax filers 65+ years of age
Average age of tax filers
Median total income of tax filers
75th percentile of total income of tax filers
85th percentile of total income of tax filers
95th percentile of total income of tax filers
Median employment income of tax filers
75th percentile of employment income of tax filers

Table CT-02: Income Groups (CANSIM 111-0041)
Number of tax filers
Percent of tax filers with total income less than $20,000
Percent of tax filers with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of tax filers with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of tax filers with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of tax filers with total income $80,000+
Value of total income (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of total income reported by tax filers with total income less than $20,000
Percent of total income reported by tax filers with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of total income reported by tax filers with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of total income reported by tax filers with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of total income reported by tax filers with total income $80,000+

Charitable Donations

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T1 Line 340 – Allowable charitable donations and government gifts

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This data set provides information on tax filers classified as charitable donors. Charitable donors are defined as tax filers reporting donations on T1 line 340 of the tax return.

Canadians contribute in many ways to charitable organizations. The data set on charitable donors provides information on tax filers who claimed a tax credit for charitable donations on their income tax return in the reference year. These data may include donations that might be denied by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) after an audit. To find out more about why donations might be denied (i.e. tax shelter gifting arrangements, false receipting) please go to the Canada Revenue Agency website.

Persons making charitable donations, but not reporting them on their personal tax return are not included in this data set. These include donations for which no receipt was provided and donations for which the receipt was lost. No estimate of such donations is included in these data.

Only donations made to approved organizations are allowable as deductions in the tax system. Donations are eligible if made to Canadian registered charities and Canadian amateur athletic associations. They are also eligible if made to: prescribed universities outside Canada; certain tax exempt housing organizations in Canada; Canadian municipalities; the United Nations; and certain charities outside Canada to which the Government of Canada has made a gift.

It is possible to carry donations forward for up to five years after the year in which they were made. In the reference year, it is possible to claim donations made in any of the previous five years, as long as they were not already claimed in a prior year. The donations made in the reference year could be claimed the same year, or could be carried forward to any of the next five years. According to tax laws, tax filers are permitted to claim both their donations and those made by their spouses to get better tax benefits. Consequently, the number of persons who made charitable donations may be higher than the number who claimed tax credits.

A change was introduced in the 2016 tax year for tax filers with a taxable income over $200,000 who made charitable donations of over $200 to a recognized charity (as outlined above). They now qualified for the following higher charitable donation tax credit:

Tax filers who contributed to a recognized charity with a taxable income of $200,000 or under continue to calculate their credit at 15% of donations up to $200 plus 29% of their donations over $200.

First-time donor's super credit (FDSC) (line 343 of Schedule 9)

Since 2013, first-time donors can claim up to an additional $1,000 of yearly donations made. The credit is 25% of the eligible amount of the cash gift, up to $1000, for a maximum credit of $250. To qualify as a first-time donor, neither the tax filer nor their spouse or common-law partner can have claimed and been allowed a charitable donations tax credit for any year after 2007.

The content of the data set is as follows:

Table CD-01: Summary (CANSIM 111-0001)
Total Number of tax filers
Number of charitable donors
Average age of donors
Average donation for age group 0-24
Average donation for age group 25-34
Average donation for age group 35-44
Average donation for age group 45-54
Average donation for age group 55-64
Average donation for age group 65+
Total amount of charitable donations (thousands of $)
Median donation
Median total income of donors
75th percentile of donors' total income

Table CD-02: Age and Sex (CANSIM 111-0002
Total Number of tax filers
Percent of tax filers who are male
Percent of tax filers who are female
Number of charitable donors
Percent of charitable donors who are male
Percent of charitable donors who are female
Percent of donors 0 - 24 years of age
Percent of donors 25 - 34 years of age
Percent of donors 35 - 44 years of age
Percent of donors 45 - 54 years of age
Percent of donors 55 - 64 years of age
Percent of donors 65+ years of age
Total median donation
Median donation of males
Median donation of females
Total amount of charitable donations (thousands of $)
Total amount of charitable donations for males (thousands of $)
Total amount of charitable donations for females (thousands of $)

Table CD-03: Income Groups (CANSIM 111-0003)
Total number of tax filers
Total number of charitable donors
Percent of charitable donors with total income less than $20,000
Percent of charitable donors with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of charitable donors with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of charitable donors with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of charitable donors with total income $80,000+
Total value of charitable donations (in thousands of dollars)
Percent of donations reported by donors with total income under $20,000
Percent of donations reported by donors with total income between $20,000 and $39,999
Percent of donations reported by donors with total income between $40,000 and $59,999
Percent of donations reported by donors with total income between $60,000 and $79,999
Percent of donations reported by donors with total income $80,000+

Statistical Tables - Footnotes and Historical Availability

RRSP Contributors

RRSP Contribution Limits (Room)

Canadian Savers

Canadian Investors

Canadian Investment Income

Canadian Capital Gains

Canadian Tax Filers

Charitable Donations

Glossary of Terms

75th percentile
Total income values are ranked from highest to lowest and the value reported as being the 75th percentile indicates that 25% of the tax filers report an income equal or above that amount and 75% fall below. Percentiles are calculated for each geographical level. For example, if the 75th percentile of total income is shown as $60,000 this means that 25% of the population under review has a total income greater than or equal to $60,000 and 75% of the population has a total income less than or equal to $60,000.

85th percentile
Starting with the 2007 data, the dollar value of the 85th percentile appears in the tables instead of the percentage above the 85th percentile like it was in previous years. Total income values are ranked from highest to lowest and the value reported as being the 85th percentile indicates that 15% of the tax filers report an income equal or above that amount and 85% fall below. Percentiles are calculated for each geographical level.
For example, if the 85th percentile of total income is shown as $65,000 this means that 15% of the tax filers has a total income greater than or equal to $65,000

95th percentile
Starting with the 2007 data, the dollar value of the 95th percentile appears in the tables instead of the percentage above the 95th percentile like it was in previous years. Total income values are ranked from highest to lowest and the value reported as being the 95th percentile indicates that 5% of the tax filers report an income equal or above that amount and 95% fall below. Percentiles are calculated for each geographical level.
For example, if the 95th percentile of total income is shown as $90,000 this means that 5% of the population under review has a total income greater than or equal to $90,000

Age
Calculated as of December 31 of the reference year (i.e., tax year minus year of birth).

Capital Gains
Line 127 of the T1 income tax return shows "taxable capital gains" or half of the capital gains actually received. The information in this data set has been grossed up to represent the total capital gains received.

Charitable donation
Is the allowable portion of total donations, as reported on the income tax return. Canadians contribute in many ways to charitable organizations. These data include only amounts given to charities and approved organizations for which official tax receipts were provided and claimed on tax returns. It is possible to carry donations forward for up to five years after the year in which they were made. Therefore, donations reported for the 2012 taxation year could include donations that were made in any of the five previous years. According to tax laws, tax filers are permitted to claim both their donations and those made by their spouses to receive better tax benefits. Consequently, the number of people who made charitable donations may be higher than the number who claimed tax credits.

Charitable donor
Is defined as a tax filer reporting a charitable donation amount on line 340 of the personal income tax form.

CityID
Since municipality names can be, in some cases, quite long and cumbersome for handling in electronic files, municipalities are given a "city identification number". Starting in 2007, the CityID is a five digits alpha-numeric component. It is created with the first letter of Postal Code followed by “9” and a four digits number. Each first letter of Postal Code is allocated a range of number from 1 to 9999 (more explanation in geography section).

Deferred profit sharing plan (DPSP)
An employer-sponsored savings plan registered by the Canada Revenue Agency. Contributions to these plans by the employer (employees cannot contribute) are based on profits. The amount accumulated in these plans can be paid out as a lump sum at retirement or termination of employment, transferred to an RRSP, received in instalments over a period not to exceed ten years, or used to purchase an annuity.

Dividend income
Includes taxable amount of dividends (eligible and other than eligible) received from taxable Canadian corporations (as stocks or mutual funds) as reported on line 120 of the personal income tax return, and then grossed down to the actual amounts received; dividend income does not include dividends received from foreign investments (which are included in interest income and reported on line 121).

Earned income
The income used to determine the RRSP/PRPP deduction limit. It includes such items as employment income (less union dues and expenses), net business and rental income, disability payments and alimony received. Alimony payments, current year business and rental losses are deducted from this amount. Most investment income (other than rents) is not considered earned income. In calculating the RRSP/PRPP deduction limit, earned income from the previous year is used.

Employment income
The total reported employment income. Employment income includes wages and salaries, commissions from employment, training allowances, tips and gratuities, and self-employment income (net income from business, profession, farming, fishing and commissions) and Tax Exempted Indian Employment Income (new in 1999 for wages and salaries, commissions, and in 2010 for self-employment income).

Interest income
Refers to the amount Canadians claimed on line 121 of the personal income tax return. This amount includes interest generated from bank deposits, Canada Savings Bonds, corporate bonds, treasury bills, investment certificates, term deposits, annuities, mutual funds, earnings on life insurance policies and all foreign interest and foreign dividend incomes.

Investment income
Includes both interest income and dividend income.

Investors
Tax filers who reported dividend income on line 120 of their personal tax return. They may or may not have also reported interest and other investment income on line 121. When such income is reported on line 121, this amount is added to the amount of dividend income received, and the sum becomes the investment income of the investor.

Level of geography
Is a code designating the type of geographic area to which the information in the table applies. See the section on Geography for further information.

Median
The middle number in a group of numbers. Where a median income, for example, is given as $26,000, it means that exactly half of the incomes reported are greater than or equal to $26,000, and that the other half is less than or equal to the median amount. With the exception of "Total Income", zero values are not included in the calculation of medians for individuals.

New RRSP room
For 2016 this amount is calculated as 18% of 2015 earned income (from definition above) to a maximum of $25,370 minus pension adjustment (PA) minus past service pension adjustment (PSPA). Since the focus of these data is for net new room for potential RRSP/ PRPP contributions, PA and/or PSPA details will be omitted.

Past service pension adjustment (PSPA)
Applies only to members of defined benefit RPPs. A PSPA occurs when the pension benefit is upgraded, or additional credits purchased, for service in past years. In the first case, it is called an exempt (from certification) PSPA; in the second case, a certifiable PSPA. Only service after 1989 is considered.

Pension adjustment (PA)
Calculated value of the pension accrued in the year in an RPP or a DPSP. The PA decreases the RRSP deduction limit. To calculate this limit, the PA from the previous year is used.

Pooled registered pension plan (PRPP)
Pooled registered pension plan is an accessible retirement savings option for individuals, including self-employed individuals. PRPP contributions made by an employer are not a taxable benefit to the tax filer, but they do reduce the tax filer’s RRSP/ PRPP deduction room.

Registered disability savings plan income (RDSP)
Beginning in 2008, the RDSP is for individuals for whom a valid disability certificate has been filed. Contributions can be made by the beneficiary or by qualified persons legally authorized to act for the beneficiary. The contributions are not deductible but the income earned is not taxable as long as it remains into the plan. Contributions are subject to a lifetime limit of $200,000; they will be matched in some degree by government contributions.

Registered pension plan (RPP)
An employer-sponsored plan registered with the Canada Revenue Agency and most commonly also with one of the pension regulatory authorities. The purpose of such plans is to provide employees with a regular income at retirement. The two main types of RPPs are called defined benefit (where the benefit formula is specified) and defined contribution (where only the contribution formula is defined).

Registered retirement savings plan (RRSP)
An individual retirement savings plan that is registered by the Canada Revenue Agency. It permits limited contributions, and income earned in the RRSP is exempt from tax until payments are received from the plan.

RRSP contributions
RRSP contributions includes money put into a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) or a Pooled Registered Pension Plan (PRPP) during the tax year under review. For PRPPs, only the tax filers portion is included in the contributions. Employer contributions to PRPP are not included.

RRSP contributors
Canadian tax filers who contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) or a Pooled Registered Pension Plan (PRPP) during the tax year under review.

Savers
Tax filers who reported interest and investment income on line 121 of the personal income tax return, but no dividend income on line 120.

Tax filer
Individual who filed a personal income tax return for the reference year.

Total income
Note: this variable was revised over the years, as reflected in the comments below; data users who plan to compare current data to data from previous years should bear in mind these changes. Also, it should be noted that all income amounts are gross, with the exception of net rental income, net limited partnership income and all forms of net self-employment income.

Income reported by tax filers from any of the following sources:

Monies not included in income above are: veterans' disability and dependent pensioners' payments, war veterans' allowances, lottery winnings and capital gains.

Total room (in thousands of dollars)
The sum of "new room" and "unused room" as defined here.

Total room (number of persons)
The number of tax filers who have either unused room from previous years, new room based on their earned income, or both. The number of persons with total room does not correspond to the sum of persons with new room and unused room, as an individual can be included in both categories.

Universal Child Care Benefit
Beginning in July 2006, the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) is a taxable amount of $100 paid monthly for each child under 6 years of age. Included in Canada Child Tax Benefits in the statistical tables.

Unused RRSP/PRPP contribution room (unused room)
The amount of the RRSP/PRPP deduction limit that is not claimed by the tax filer, or the amount remaining after subtracting actual contributions claimed on the tax return from that year's contribution room. Unused room can be carried forward indefinitely. The first year of unused room is from 1991 (see table B).

Geography

The data are available for the following geographic areas. See "Statistical Tables - Footnotes and Historical Availability" for further details. The mailing address at the time of filing is the basis for the geographic information in the tables.

Standard areas:

*These postal geography levels were available in the past but are no longer available for this data.

User-defined areas:

For cost recovery tabulations, users may select specific areas of interest which do not correspond to standard areas. To obtain aggregated data for such areas, users can provide a list of lower level postal or census geography (Postal Codes, forward sortation areas, census tracts, census subdivisions, etc.) grouped according to their defined areas. These areas must satisfy our confidentiality requirements. See the "Special Geography" section for further information.

Geographic Levels – Census Geography

Data are also available for the following levels of the Census geography; the following table shows the coded designators for these geographies, as well as a brief description of each.

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 12
Area: Canada
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 11
Area: Province or Territory Total
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 61
Area: Census Tract
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 51
Area: Economic Region
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 42
Area: Census Agglomeration
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 41
Area: Census Metropolitan Area
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 31
Area: Federal Electoral District
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 21
Area: Census Division
Description:

Changes in Census Geography – 2016 boundaries as compared to 2011 boundaries

When comparing data between the 2015 and 2016 reference years, users should consider that some of the changes in the data can be due to Census boundary changes. The data for the 2015 reference year are produced according to the 2011 Census boundaries, while the data for the 2016 reference year are based on the 2016 Census boundaries.

Changes to Census Metropolitan Areas (CMA)

For the 2016 Census, Belleville (Ont.) and Lethbridge (Alta.), which were both a census agglomeration (CA) in 2011, became census metropolitan areas (CMA). In addition, census subdivisions (CSD) previously considered to be outside CMAs were added in eleven CMAs (Table C). Census subdivision is the general term for municipalities (as determined by provincial/territorial legislation) or areas treated as municipal equivalents for statistical purposes (e.g., Indian reserves, Indian settlements and unorganized territories).

Table C
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table C. The information is grouped by Census Metropolitan Area (appearing as row headers), Census Subdivision added (appearing as column headers).
Census Metropolitan Area Census Subdivision added
Code Name Code Name
305 Moncton 1306001 Hopewell
310 Saint John 1305016 Norton
408 Saguenay 2494250 Bégin
421 Québec 2433095 Saint-Antoine-de-Tilly
462 Montréal 2456083 Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu
- - 2463048 Saint-Lin--Laurentides
505 Ottawa - Gatineau 2480050 Thurso
- - 2480055 Lochaber
- - 2480060 Lochaber-Partie-Ouest
- - 3507065 North Grenville
522 Belleville 3512001 Tyendinaga
- - 3512020 Stirling-Rawdon
541 Kitchener - Cambridge - Waterloo 3530020 Wilmot
580 Greater Sudbury / Grand Sudbury 3552013 Markstay-Warren
705 Regina 4706011 Lajord No. 128
725 Saskatoon 4715018 Aberdeen No. 373
- - 4715019 Aberdeen

There was also a few boundary changes which impact the total area covered by specific CMAs. Most notably, there was an overall small increase in the land area of the Edmonton CMA (Table D) primarily because of changes in the land area of these CDS:

Table D
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table D. The information is grouped by Census Metropolitan Area (appearing as row headers), Census Subdivision change in land area (appearing as column headers).
Census Metropolitan Area Census Subdivision change in land area
Code Name Code Name
835 Edmonton 4810066 Bruderheim
- - 4811012 Leduc County
- - 4811016 Leduc
- - 4811018 Devon
- - 4811034 Parkland County
- - 4811052 Strathcona County
- - 4811059 Sturgeon County

Changes to Census Agglomerations (CA)

For the 2016 Census:

eight new census agglomerations were introduced: Gander (N.L.), Sainte-Marie (Que.), Arnprior (Ont.), Carleton Place (Ont.), Wasaga Beach (Ont.), Winkler (Man.), Weyburn (Sask.) and Nelson (B.C.).

The Amos (Que.) and Temiskaming Shores (Ont.) census agglomerations were retired in 2016 because they no longer met the appropriate population criteria. Another census agglomeration no longer is present since the Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu (Que.) census agglomeration has been merged into the Montréal (Que.) census metropolitan area.

Belleville (Ont.) and Lethbridge (Alta.), which were both a census agglomeration in 2011, became census metropolitan areas.
In Alberta, two additional census agglomerations, Grande Prairie and Wood Buffalo, now meet the population criteria for which census tracts are generated.
Census Subdivisions (CSD) previously considered to be outside census agglomerations were added in six census agglomerations which altered the land area and population they include (Table E).

Table E
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table E. The information is grouped by Census Agglomeration (appearing as row headers), Census Subdivision added (appearing as column headers).
Census Agglomeration Census Subdivision added
Code Name Code Name
320 Fredericton 1303005 Tracy
- - 1310004 Manners Sutton
- - 1310005 Harvey
- - 1310017 Hanwell
- - 1310021 Queensbury
447 Drummondville 2449020 Lefebvre
- - 2449025 L'Avenir
- - 2449100 Saint-Edmond-de-Grantham
450 Granby 2447047 Roxton Pond
562 Sarnia 3538035 Plympton-Wyoming
575 North Bay 3548031 Chisholm
- - 3548094 Nipissing, Unorganized, North Part
- - 3549060 Powassan
- - 3549071 Nipissing
930 Chilliwack 5909034 Fraser Valley D
- - 5909035 Fraser Valley H
- - 5909837 Cheam 1
- - 5909844 Popkum 1

In addition, there are twenty six census agglomerations (Table F) which exist in both the 2011 Census and 2016 Census where boundary changes alter the area they cover.

Table F
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table F. The information is grouped by Census Agglomeration (appearing as row headers), (appearing as column headers).
Census Agglomeration
Code Name Code Name
015 Corner Brook 485 Rouyn-Noranda
105 Charlottetown 530 Kawartha Lakes
328 Bathurst 553 Stratford
330 Campbellton 569 Orillia
335 Edmundston 610 Brandon
404 Rimouski 640 Thompson
405 Rivière-du-Loup 735 North Battleford
406 Baie-Comeau 745 Prince Albert
411 Dolbeau-Mistassini 821 High River
428 Saint-Georges 831 Sylvan Lake
430 Thetford Mines 850 Grande Prairie
444 Shawinigan 943 Courtenay
454 Sorel-Tracy 952 Quesnel

Changes to Census Divisions (CD)

Between the 2011 Census and 2016 Census, one census division changed name: Lajemmerais (Que.) was renamed as Marguerite-D'Youville.

There were also several changes in boundaries between pairs of adjacent census divisions which caused both the land area and the populations of census divisions to change. While most of these changes lead only to very small changes in the actual population counts, changes in the pairs of adjacent census divisions listed in Table G were more significant.

Table G
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table G. The information is grouped by Province/Territory (appearing as row headers), 2016 Census Division (appearing as column headers).
Province/Territory 2016 Census Division
- Code Name Code Name
N.B. 1309 Northumberland 1315  Gloucester
Man. 4602 Division No. 2 4603 Division No. 3
Man. 4604 Division No. 4 4608 Division No. 8
Man. 4607 Division No. 7 4615 Division No. 15
N.W.T. 6105 Region 5 6106 Region 6

For more information on specific boundary changes, please refer to the section “How to obtain more information” at the end of this document.

Geographic Levels – Postal Geography

The various data compiled from the tax file are available for different levels of the postal geography. Coded geographic indicators appearing on the data tables are shown below with a brief description.

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 12
Postal Area: Canada
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 11
Postal Area: Province or Territory Total
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 10
Postal Area: Other Provincial Total ("P" Pot)
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 09
Postal Area: Rural Communities (Not in City)
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 08
Postal Area: City Total (Postal city)
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 07
Postal Area: Other Urban Area (Non-residential within city - "E" Pot)
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 06
Postal Area: Rural Postal Code Areas (Within City)
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 05
Postal Area: Suburban Service
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 04
Postal Area: Rural Route
Description:

Level of Geography (L.O.G.): 03
Postal Area: Urban FSA (Partial FSA in Residential Area)
Description:

Adding postal areas without duplication

Data files according to the postal geography will often contain subtotals and totals. Many data users need to add certain geographies in order to come up with a total for their particular area of interest. However, including subtotals during this process results in double-counting some populations, and this leads to an erroneous total. The following is a summary of which postal areas are aggregations in the standard postal geography.

Urban FSAs (LOG 3), Rural Routes (LOG 4), suburban services (LOG 5), Rural Postal Code Areas within a city (LOG 6) and Other Urban Areas (LOG 7) add up to City Totals (LOG 8).

City Totals (LOG 8), Rural Communities not in a city (LOG 9) and Other Provincial Totals (LOG 10) add up to provincial/territorial totals (LOG 11).

Provincial/territorial totals (LOG 11) add up to the Canada total (LOG 12).

Thus, using the Level of geography codes:
3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 = 8
8 + 9 + 10 = 11

City identification number (CityID)

The CityID is created for postal cities. This concept of cities does not correspond to the official boundaries of municipalities.

As of 2007, CityID has been modified.

Previous to 2007:

Starting with 2007 data:
To create more possibilities without changing the CityID length in our systems:

Table H
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table C. The information is grouped by Postal Code (appearing as row headers), Postal city name, 2006 and Prior and 2007 and Follow (appearing as column headers).
Postal Code Postal city name 2006 and Prior 2007 and Follow
K1A xxx Ottawa 2434 K2434
G3C xxx Stoneham-et-Tewkesbury n/a G2
Table I
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table D. The information is grouped by Province (appearing as row headers), Letter file and Range of number (appearing as column headers).
Province Letter file Range of number
Newfoundland & Labrador A 1 – 9999
Prince Edward Island C 1 – 9999
Nova Scotia B 1 – 9999
New Brunswick E 1 – 9999
Quebec G 1 – 9999
Quebec H 1 – 9999
Quebec J 1 – 9999
Ontario K 1 – 9999
Ontario L 1 – 9999
Ontario M 1 – 9999
Ontario N 1 – 9999
Ontario P 1 – 9999
Manitoba R 1 – 9999
Saskatchewan S 1 – 9999
Alberta T 1 – 9999
British Columbia V 1 – 9999
Yukon Y 1 – 9999
Northwest Territories X 1 – 9999
Nunavut X 1 – 9999

Therefore, it is now essential to identify a postal city by adding the Postal Code 1st letter to the number in order to get the proper postal city in the proper province (Table J):

Table J
Table summary
This table displays the results of Table E. The information is grouped by Letter (appearing as row headers), Number, Postal city name and Province (appearing as column headers).
Letter Number Postal city name Province
A 2 Avondale NL
B 2 Bible Hill NS
T 2 Rocky View AB
G 2 Stoneham-et-Tewkesbury QC

Hierarchy of postal geography

Figure 1 Hierarchy of postal geography

Description for Figure 1

Hierarchy of postal geography. The various data compiled from the taxfile are available for different levels of the postal geography. Canada (12) is divided into Provinces and Territories (11), which are subsequently divided into City Totals (08), Rural Communities (09) and Other Provincial Totals (10). City Totals (08) is then broken down into Urban Forward Sortation Areas (03), Rural Routes (04), Sub-urban Services (05), Rural Postal Code Areas (06) and Other Urban Areas (07).

Geographic Levels – Special Geography

Clients may select geographical areas of their own definition; areas that are not part of the standard areas listed here (for example, bank service areas, retail store catchment areas). For this, clients must submit a list of lower level geographies such as Postal Codes or census tracts that make up their user defined areas. We will then aggregate the micro data to correspond to that area of interest. If there is more than one level of geography within the areas submitted by the client, this must be clearly indicated. A list of low level geographies which rollup into user defined areas is commonly referred to as a conversion file and is usually supplied to us in an Excel format.

We invite your comments

We are always working on ways to improve our products. The comments we receive concerning quality and presentation are essential to meet this objective. If you have any suggestions in this regard, we encourage you, the user, to provide us with your comments.

How to obtain more detailed information

Inquiries about these data and related statistics or services should be directed to:

Client Services, Income Statistics Division
Telephone: Toll Free 1-888-297-7355 or 613-951-7355
Statistics Canada, R. H. Coats Building, 15th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0T6
Online requests: STATCAN.income-revenu.STATCAN@canada.ca

List of available data products

The Income Statistics Division of Statistics Canada tabulates statistical data derived from administrative records - most notably, the tax file. The resulting demographic and socio-economic data sets available are listed in the table below, along with their identifying product number and the usual release dates.

List of Available Data Products
Table summary
This table displays the results of List of Available Data Products. The information is grouped by Product name (appearing as row headers), Product number and Release date (appearing as column headers).
Product name Product number Release date
RRSP Contributors 17C0006 Winter
RRSP Contribution Limits (Room) 17C0011 Winter
Canadian Savers 17C0009 Winter
Canadian Investors 17C0007 Winter
Canadian Investment Income 17C0008 Winter
Canadian Tax Filers 17C0010 Winter
Canadian Capital Gains 17C0012 Winter
Charitable Donors 13C0014 Winter
Individuals 13C0015 Spring - Summer
Economic Dependency Profile 13C0017 Spring - Summer
Labour Income Profile 71C0018 Spring - Summer
Families 13C0016 Spring - Summer
Seniors 89C0022 Spring - Summer
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