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  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201900100006
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides new and current insights into the behaviour of Canadian businesses as they meet the cyber security challenges of a changing world. It presents information on how businesses are exposed to cyber security risks and threats, the impact cybercrime had on business operations in 2017, the reporting practices of businesses and the types of security measures businesses invest in to protect against cybercrime. Where appropriate, the article compares data from the Canadian Survey of Cyber Security and Cybercrime to the information collected through United Kingdom's Cyber Security Breaches Survey, 2018, to understand whether the experience of Canadian businesses is similar to that of UK Businesses.

    Release date: 2019-03-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0115X
    Description:

    This document provides a comprehensive reference to the information available from the General Social Survey (GSS). It provides a description of the content of each of the 18 GSS cycles (e.g. time use, social support, education, the family), as well as background information, target population and collection methodology. A list of the products and services available from each cycle is also included.

    Release date: 2019-02-20

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2018007
    Description:

    This web application provides access to data on cyber security and cybercrime in Canada for 23 sectors at the two to four digit level NAICS. This dynamic application allows users to easily compare their cyber security posture against others in the sector and to create quick and easy reports with interactive charts that can be easily copied into other programs.

    Release date: 2018-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2018003
    Description:

    This paper describes the methodology that Statistics Canada has adopted to measure the price change of residential Internet access services.

    Release date: 2018-08-07

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Public use microdata: 56M0004X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Household Component of the CIUS includes a short series of questions on the type of Internet connections and devices used by households to access the Internet from home, as well as availability of high speed service, and a standard module on household income. The questions may be answered by any knowledgeable member of the household. This content is supplemented by selected household characteristics and some geographic detail (i.e. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20

  • Public use microdata: 56M0005X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Individual Component is administered in a similar fashion to the individual-level surveys conducted in prior years. Following the Household Component, an individual aged 16 years and older is randomly selected and asked about their use of the Internet, and online activities including electronic commerce. While the Household Component covers Internet access at home, the Individual Component covers uses of the Internet from any location. This content is supplemented by individual and household characteristics (e.g. age, household income, family type) and some geographical detail (e.g. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20

  • Table: 63-241-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the newspaper publishing industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2013-12-05

  • Public use microdata: 56M0003X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the extent and scope to which individual Canadians use the Internet. Survey content includes the location of use (e.g., at home, at work), the frequency and intensity of use, the specific uses of the Internet from the home, the purchase of products and services (electronic commerce), and other issues related to Internet use (such as concerns over privacy). This content is supplemented by information on individual and household characteristics (e.g., age, income, education, family type) and some geographic detail (e.g. province, urban/rural, and Census Metropolitan Area).

    Release date: 2012-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111530
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2009, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system, which included questions regarding victimization and safety on the Internet. Interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 19,500 respondents, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents aged 18 and over living with children aged 8 to 17 were also asked to provide information on these children's experiences with victimization on the Internet.

    This Juristat article presents information on victimizations on the Internet as reported by respondents in 2009, with a particular focus on Internet bank fraud, cyber-bullying, hate content on the Internet and problems with Internet purchases. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic risk factors, reporting to authorities and perceptions of general safety on the Internet.

    Release date: 2011-09-15
Data (15)

Data (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2018007
    Description:

    This web application provides access to data on cyber security and cybercrime in Canada for 23 sectors at the two to four digit level NAICS. This dynamic application allows users to easily compare their cyber security posture against others in the sector and to create quick and easy reports with interactive charts that can be easily copied into other programs.

    Release date: 2018-10-15

  • Public use microdata: 56M0004X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Household Component of the CIUS includes a short series of questions on the type of Internet connections and devices used by households to access the Internet from home, as well as availability of high speed service, and a standard module on household income. The questions may be answered by any knowledgeable member of the household. This content is supplemented by selected household characteristics and some geographic detail (i.e. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20

  • Public use microdata: 56M0005X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Individual Component is administered in a similar fashion to the individual-level surveys conducted in prior years. Following the Household Component, an individual aged 16 years and older is randomly selected and asked about their use of the Internet, and online activities including electronic commerce. While the Household Component covers Internet access at home, the Individual Component covers uses of the Internet from any location. This content is supplemented by individual and household characteristics (e.g. age, household income, family type) and some geographical detail (e.g. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20

  • Table: 63-241-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the newspaper publishing industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2013-12-05

  • Public use microdata: 56M0003X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the extent and scope to which individual Canadians use the Internet. Survey content includes the location of use (e.g., at home, at work), the frequency and intensity of use, the specific uses of the Internet from the home, the purchase of products and services (electronic commerce), and other issues related to Internet use (such as concerns over privacy). This content is supplemented by information on individual and household characteristics (e.g., age, income, education, family type) and some geographic detail (e.g. province, urban/rural, and Census Metropolitan Area).

    Release date: 2012-11-23

  • Public use microdata: 62M0004X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file for the Survey of Household Spending provides detailed information on household expenditures, dwelling characteristics, and ownership of household equipment such as appliances, communications and entertainment equipment, and vehicles.

    Release date: 2011-06-03

  • Public use microdata: 12M0023X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 23 (2009) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 23 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians perceive crime and the justice system and their experiences of victimization. The survey is designed to produce estimates of the extent to which persons are the victims of eight types of offences (assault, sexual assault, robbery, theft of personal property, breaking and entering, motor vehicle theft, theft of household property and vandalism); to examine the risk factors associated with victimization; to examine the rates of reporting to the police; and to evaluate the fear of crime and public perceptions of crime and the criminal justice system.

    Cycle 23 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on victimization. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1988, 1993, 1999 and 2004. Cycle 23 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues of crime prevention and Internet victimization.

    Release date: 2011-02-10

  • Table: 62-202-X
    Description:

    This publication presents statistical highlights and key tables from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS). This annual survey collects information about expenditures by households and families in Canada on a wide variety of goods and services, as well as their dwelling characteristics and possession of household equipment such as appliances, audio and video equipment, and vehicles. The publication also includes analytical text, summary-level tables, a detailed table, notes and definitions, and information about survey methodology and data quality.

    Release date: 2010-12-17

  • Table: 56-001-X200700210550
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this bulletin are for the year ending on August 31 and for the period from 2003 to 2006. The following text contains references to previous periods when it is useful to set the industry's performance in a historical context.

    Release date: 2007-12-07

  • Table: 56-001-X20060049524
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this bulletin are for the year ending on August 31 and for the period from 2002 to 2005. The following text contains references to previous periods when it is useful to set the industry's performance in a historical context.

    Release date: 2006-11-20
Analysis (91)

Analysis (91) (0 to 10 of 91 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201900100006
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides new and current insights into the behaviour of Canadian businesses as they meet the cyber security challenges of a changing world. It presents information on how businesses are exposed to cyber security risks and threats, the impact cybercrime had on business operations in 2017, the reporting practices of businesses and the types of security measures businesses invest in to protect against cybercrime. Where appropriate, the article compares data from the Canadian Survey of Cyber Security and Cybercrime to the information collected through United Kingdom's Cyber Security Breaches Survey, 2018, to understand whether the experience of Canadian businesses is similar to that of UK Businesses.

    Release date: 2019-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2018003
    Description:

    This paper describes the methodology that Statistics Canada has adopted to measure the price change of residential Internet access services.

    Release date: 2018-08-07

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111530
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2009, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system, which included questions regarding victimization and safety on the Internet. Interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 19,500 respondents, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents aged 18 and over living with children aged 8 to 17 were also asked to provide information on these children's experiences with victimization on the Internet.

    This Juristat article presents information on victimizations on the Internet as reported by respondents in 2009, with a particular focus on Internet bank fraud, cyber-bullying, hate content on the Internet and problems with Internet purchases. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic risk factors, reporting to authorities and perceptions of general safety on the Internet.

    Release date: 2011-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010002
    Description:

    This paper investigates the intensity and scope of Internet usage among individual Canadians, based on data from the 2005 and 2007 Canadian Internet Use Surveys (CIUS). It profiles various aspects of online behaviour and analyzes the 2007 findings to examine patterns of scope of Internet use by user characteristics. Multivariate analyses are applied to explore the relationships among Internet use behaviour and characteristics such as age, sex, income, and education.

    In addition to the shift from dial-up to high-speed Internet access that has been occurring among Canadian Internet users, the 2005 to 2007 period also saw a slight increase in the proportion of users who were online daily and for at least five hours per week. While this proportion is growing, fewer than 50% of Canadian Internet users were characterized as high intensity users in 2005 and 2007. Among individuals with high-speed connections, the low intensity users continued to outnumber the high intensity ones, challenging the notion that access to a high speed connection leads to intensive Internet usage. Among Internet users, age, income, sex, and years of online experience were all associated with the propensity to engage in online activities and to use the Internet intensively. The finding that experienced Internet users do use the Internet in more extensive ways underscores the importance of studying the nature of Internet users as they gain more experience.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009005
    Description:

    Before the Internet was launched commercially, few people outside the scientific and academic worlds were aware of this new technology. Commerce has since changed in unimaginable ways and it is now possible to search, purchase and sell just about anything over the Internet. Using data from Statistics Canada's Internet use surveys, this research examines the data, trends and patterns in Canadian online shopping from 2001 to 2007.

    Release date: 2009-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010978
    Description:

    Census developers and social researchers are at a critical juncture in determining collection modes of the future. Internet data collection is technically feasible, but the initial investment in hardware and software is costly. Given the great divide in computer knowledge and access, internet data collection is viable for some, but not for all. Therefore internet cannot fully replace the existing paper questionnaire - at least not in the near future.

    Canada, Australia and New Zealand are pioneers in internet data collection as an option for completing the census. This paper studies four driving forces behind this collection mode: 1) responding to social/public expectations; 2) longer term economic benefits; 3) improved data quality; and 4) improved coverage.

    Issues currently being faced are: 1) estimating internet uptake and maximizing benefits without undue risk; 2) designing a questionnaire for multiple modes; 3) producing multiple public communication approaches; and 4) gaining positive public reaction and trust in using the internet.

    This paper summarizes the countries' collective thinking and experiences on the benefits and limitation of internet data collection for a census of population and dwellings. It also provides an outline of where countries are heading in terms of internet data collection in the future.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010980
    Description:

    A census is the largest and possibly one of the most complex data collection operations undertaken by a government. Many of the challenges encountered are linked to the sheer size of the operation, when millions of dwellings need to be contacted, and thousands of people must be mobilized to help in the data collection efforts. Statistics Canada is a world leader in its approaches to census data collection. New collection approaches were introduced with the 2006 Census, more particularly an Internet response option, to add to the mail-out, telephone and face-to-face collection approaches. Such diversity in data collection methods requires an integrated approach to management to ensure quality and efficiency in an environment of declining survey response rates and a tighter fiscal framework. In preparing for its' 2011 Census, Statistics Canada is putting in place a number of new systems and processes to actively manage field data collection operations. One of the key elements of the approach will be a Field Management System which will allow the majority of field personnel to register enumeration progress in the field, and be informed in a very timely fashion of questionnaires received at the Data Operations Centre via Internet, by mail or other channels, thus informing them to cease non-response follow up efforts on those dwellings, in an attempt to eliminate unnecessary follow-up work.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010986
    Description:

    Major changes were made to the data collection process for the 2006 Census. One of those changes was the Internet response option, which was offered to all private households in Canada. Nearly one in five households chose to complete and return the questionnaire on-line. In addition, a new method of promoting Internet response was tested via the Internet Response Promotion (IRP) Study. The new approach proved very effective at increasing the on-line response rate. Planning for the 2011 Census, which is under way, calls for the use of a wave collection strategy, and wave 1 would be the IRP method. This paper provides an overview of Internet data collection in the 2006 Census - evaluations, results, lessons learned - and the methodology that will be used in the next census in 2011.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010987
    Description:

    Over the last few years, there have been large progress in the web data collection area. Today, many statistical offices offer a web alternative in many different types of surveys. It is widely believed that web data collection may raise data quality while lowering data collection costs. Experience has shown that, offered web as a second alternative to paper questionnaires; enterprises have been slow to embrace the web alternative. On the other hand, experiments have also shown that by promoting web over paper, it is possible to raise the web take up rates. However, there are still few studies on what happens when the contact strategy is changed radically and the web option is the only option given in a complex enterprise survey. In 2008, Statistics Sweden took the step of using more or less a web-only strategy in the survey of industrial production (PRODCOM). The web questionnaire was developed in the generalised tool for web surveys used by Statistics Sweden. The paper presents the web solution and some experiences from the 2008 PRODCOM survey, including process data on response rates and error ratios as well as the results of a cognitive follow-up of the survey. Some important lessons learned are also presented.

    Release date: 2009-12-03
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0115X
    Description:

    This document provides a comprehensive reference to the information available from the General Social Survey (GSS). It provides a description of the content of each of the 18 GSS cycles (e.g. time use, social support, education, the family), as well as background information, target population and collection methodology. A list of the products and services available from each cycle is also included.

    Release date: 2019-02-20

  • Notices and consultations: 92-132-X
    Description:

    This report describes the comments received as a result of the second round of the 2006 Census consultations. As with the previous 2006 Census consultation, this second round of consultations integrated discussions on the dissemination program, questionnaire content and census geography. However, the focus of this second round of consultations was placed on the 2001 Census of Population dissemination program and proposed directions for 2006 geography. Consultations were held from January to June 2004. Approximately 1,000 comments were captured through written submissions and the organization of over 40 meetings across Canada.

    This report describes users' feedback on dissemination and geography issues received through this second round of consultations. In addition to user's comments, web metrics information serves as a valuable tool when evaluating the accessibility of public good data tables. Therefore, page view counts have been integrated in this report.

    Some general planning assumptions that focus on the production and dissemination of 2006 Census products are also included in this report.

    Release date: 2005-05-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004027
    Description:

    This activity looks at the different ways in which technology is used on the farm.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004028
    Description:

    This lesson focuses on computer use on farms. As in other parts of society, computers are a part of farmers' lives. Computers provide much-needed information on farms and facilitate activities such as banking, marketing, communications and research.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016234
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    With the goal of obtaining a complete enumeration of the Canadian agricultural sector, the 2001 Census of Agriculture has been conducted using several collection methods. Challenges to the traditional drop-off and mail-back of paper questionnaires in a household-based enumeration have led to the adoption of supplemental methods using newer technologies to maintain the coverage and content of the census. Overall, this mixed-mode data collection process responds to the critical needs of the census programme at various points. This paper examines these data collection methods, several quality assessments, and the future challenges of obtaining a co-ordinated view of the methods' individual approaches to achieving data quality.

    Release date: 2002-09-12
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