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  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016381
    Description:

    Changes in health status may affect not just the individuals who experience such changes, but also their family members. For example, if the main earner in a family loses his or her ability to generate income due to a health shock, it invariably affects the financial situation of the spouse and other dependents. In addition, spouses and working-age children may themselves increase or reduce their labour supply to make up for the lost income (“added worker effect”) or care for a sick family member (“caregiver effect”). Since consumption smoothing and self-insurance occur at the household level, the financial effects of health for other family members have important policy implications. To shed light on such effects, this study analyzes how one spouse’s cancer diagnosis affects the employment and earnings of the other spouse and (before-tax) total family income using administrative data from Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600514613
    Description:

    This article provides information on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias among Canadians aged 45 or older, using the 2010/2011 Canadian Community Health Survey, the 2011/2012 Survey of Neurological Conditions in Institutions in Canada, and the 2011 Survey on Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Stats in brief: 89-652-X2016003
    Description:

    This fact sheet examines the satisfaction with work-life balance of mothers and fathers of children aged 17 and under who work full-time.

    Release date: 2016-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 82-624-X201500114214
    Description:

    This article, highlights the impact of mental health problems on family members and caregiver using data from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey – Mental Health (CCHS – MH). The analysis will highlight the general and mental health, as well as the caregiving roles of Canadians who reported having a family member who had problems with their mental health.

    Release date: 2015-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2015001
    Description:

    This report uses data from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) to present a profile of disability in Canada, with a particular focus on selected sociodemographic characteristics, such as age, sex, severity, education, employment, and income as well as on the use of aids and assistive devices, transportation, and the unmet needs of persons with disabilities.

    Release date: 2015-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114142
    Description:

    This article provides information on the care provided by caregivers to seniors with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. It focuses on how the intensity and nature of the care vary depending on seniors’ type of housing. Four types of housing are examined: care facilities, supportive housing, private households separate from the caregiver, and private households shared with the caregiver.

    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401114112
    Description:

    This study provides estimates of the prevalence of Parkinson’s disease, the time from symptom onset to diagnosis, the social, financial and physical impacts, and the characteristics of caregivers.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 89-652-X2014004
    Description:

    This is a fact sheet about end-of-life care. The results are based on data from the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on Caregiving and Care Receiving.

    Release date: 2014-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014003
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on Caregiving and Care Receiving, this report presents the number of young caregivers in Canada, the relationship of the caregiver to care recipient, the intensity of caregiving, and the types of care provided. The report also highlights the impact of caregiving duties on young caregivers, examining the possible consequences on education, paid work and mental and physical health.

    Release date: 2014-09-24
Data (12)

Data (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Public use microdata: 89M0031X
    Description:

    This package was designed to help users access and manipulate the public use microdata file (PUMF) for the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on caregiving and care receiving. It contains all PUMF data and describes the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures for this survey, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates.

    Release date: 2014-08-27

  • Table: 89-628-X2010015
    Description:

    The Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is Canada's national survey that gathers information about adults and children whose daily activities are limited by a physical, mental, or other health-related condition or problem.

    This report presents a series of tables on the help with everyday activities as well as unmet needs and help providers.

    Release date: 2010-01-29

  • Table: 89-640-X
    Description:

    This publication contains tables on civic and political participation, sense of belonging to Canada, and unpaid work. The source of the data is the 2008 General Social Survey, Cycle 22: Social Networks. This cycle collected information on changes respondents had experienced in the last 12 months, the resources they used during these transitions and unmet needs for help. Questions were also asked on contact with family and friends, volunteering and trust in people and institutions.

    Release date: 2009-06-26

  • Public use microdata: 12M0021X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for the 21st cycle (2007) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey. Cycle 21 of the GSS collected data from persons aged 45 years and over living in private households in the 10 provinces of Canada. The survey covered a wide range of topics such as well-being, family composition, retirement decisions and plans, care giving and care receiving experiences, social networks and housing.

    Release date: 2009-05-04

  • Table: 97-559-X2006029
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census subdivisions and dissemination areas are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Labour', which presents data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker, and work activity during the reference year. The census is the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories.

    This topic also presents data on the unpaid work of the Canadian workforce, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care, and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2008-12-19

  • Table: 89-633-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Cycle 21 of the 2007 General Social Survey (GSS) was on "Family, Social Support and Retirement". Data were collected over a 9 month period from March to December 2007 with a sample of approximately 25,000 respondents representing the non-institutionalized population in the 10 provinces. These tables contain data on the prevalence of care given and received by seniors because of long-term health problems, selected employment consequences of providing care to seniors and self-rated stress experienced by caregivers. All tables are available by sex and age groups, and for Canada and the provinces or regions.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • Table: 89-628-X2008010
    Description:

    This fourth set of tables presents a series that examines how caring for a child with a disability influences the family unit, and more specifically, the parents who care for them. Such as household income, health and stress, employment and finances, marital relationships, and childcare arrangements.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Table: 89-583-X
    Description:

    Cycle 16 of the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS) was on 'Aging and Social Support.' Data were collected over an 11-month period from February to December 2002 with a sample of approximately 25,000 respondents representing the non-institutionalized population in the 10 provinces.

    These tables contain data on the prevalence of care received by seniors because of long-term health problems, the prevalence of informal care given to seniors because of long-term health problems and consequences of providing care to seniors. All tables are available by sex and age groups, and for Canada and the provinces.

    Note: For a detailed analysis, please see the document 'The Consequences of Caring for an Aging Society' (Catalogue no. 89-582-XIE).

    Release date: 2003-09-02

  • Table: 89-581-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children who are limited because of a physical condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private or collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected in the fall of 2001.

    These tables contain data on the use of and need for supports for adults with disabilities, by sex and age groups, for Canada and the provinces.

    Note: For a detailed analysis, please see the document A Profile of Disability in Canada, 2001 (Catalogue no. 89-577-XIE).

    Release date: 2003-03-25

  • Table: 97F0013X2001002
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Work force: Unpaid Work," which shows 2001 Census data on the unpaid work of the Canadian workforce, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyze the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyze how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.

    This table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Canada's Work force: Unpaid Work, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0013XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0013XIE2001002.

    Release date: 2003-02-11
Analysis (33)

Analysis (33) (0 to 10 of 33 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016381
    Description:

    Changes in health status may affect not just the individuals who experience such changes, but also their family members. For example, if the main earner in a family loses his or her ability to generate income due to a health shock, it invariably affects the financial situation of the spouse and other dependents. In addition, spouses and working-age children may themselves increase or reduce their labour supply to make up for the lost income (“added worker effect”) or care for a sick family member (“caregiver effect”). Since consumption smoothing and self-insurance occur at the household level, the financial effects of health for other family members have important policy implications. To shed light on such effects, this study analyzes how one spouse’s cancer diagnosis affects the employment and earnings of the other spouse and (before-tax) total family income using administrative data from Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600514613
    Description:

    This article provides information on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias among Canadians aged 45 or older, using the 2010/2011 Canadian Community Health Survey, the 2011/2012 Survey of Neurological Conditions in Institutions in Canada, and the 2011 Survey on Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Stats in brief: 89-652-X2016003
    Description:

    This fact sheet examines the satisfaction with work-life balance of mothers and fathers of children aged 17 and under who work full-time.

    Release date: 2016-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 82-624-X201500114214
    Description:

    This article, highlights the impact of mental health problems on family members and caregiver using data from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey – Mental Health (CCHS – MH). The analysis will highlight the general and mental health, as well as the caregiving roles of Canadians who reported having a family member who had problems with their mental health.

    Release date: 2015-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2015001
    Description:

    This report uses data from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) to present a profile of disability in Canada, with a particular focus on selected sociodemographic characteristics, such as age, sex, severity, education, employment, and income as well as on the use of aids and assistive devices, transportation, and the unmet needs of persons with disabilities.

    Release date: 2015-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114142
    Description:

    This article provides information on the care provided by caregivers to seniors with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. It focuses on how the intensity and nature of the care vary depending on seniors’ type of housing. Four types of housing are examined: care facilities, supportive housing, private households separate from the caregiver, and private households shared with the caregiver.

    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401114112
    Description:

    This study provides estimates of the prevalence of Parkinson’s disease, the time from symptom onset to diagnosis, the social, financial and physical impacts, and the characteristics of caregivers.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 89-652-X2014004
    Description:

    This is a fact sheet about end-of-life care. The results are based on data from the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on Caregiving and Care Receiving.

    Release date: 2014-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014003
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on Caregiving and Care Receiving, this report presents the number of young caregivers in Canada, the relationship of the caregiver to care recipient, the intensity of caregiving, and the types of care provided. The report also highlights the impact of caregiving duties on young caregivers, examining the possible consequences on education, paid work and mental and physical health.

    Release date: 2014-09-24
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

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