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All (32) (0 to 10 of 32 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100014
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2006 and 2016 censuses of population, as well as integrated census data from 2006 and 2016, to examine the characteristics associated with English-French bilingualism among Canadian children and youth who were aged 5 to 17 in 2006. The study also examines the factors associated with the acquisition and retention of English-French bilingualism among children and youth in Quebec and in Canada outside Quebec.

    Release date: 2019-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011090
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Not all high school graduates who attend a post-secondary institution go immediately after completing their diploma. An ever-increasing number of Canadian youth choose to remain out of the education system for a period of time prior to re-entering. A great deal of what we know about a gap year comes from other countries, particularly the United Kingdom. Who delays and for how long are, however, two questions that remain to be answered in the Canadian context. The current paper uses all five cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to address the scant attention paid in the Canadian literature to the delay of the start of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Kaplan Meier results show that the median length of time between high school graduation and start of the first post-secondary (PSE) program is 4 months; however, this appears to be substantially longer for males, First Nations youth, Anglophones, youth from Ontario and youth whose parents have low levels of educational attainment. Equally influential were characteristics during the high school years. For example, youth with low marks, who worked many hours in paid employment while in high school, who skipped classes regularly, who took part in a lot of extracurricular activities not organized by the school, and whose close friends said they were not planning on going to PSE had median gap times between high school graduation and the start of postsecondary studies that were much longer than the average. Cox Proportional Hazard models confirm the robustness of several of the descriptive findings, including the effects of gender, province of high school, parental education, working during high school, marks, extracurricular activities, and the education plans of close friends.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2010002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the English-speaking population in Quebec was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Justice Canada. It is one of eleven such portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Quebec based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2010-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111074
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This article looks at the prevalence of French-language knowledge among sales and service workers (salespersons, food servers, cashiers). Information is also provided regarding their use of French at work. There is a special focus on the metropolitan areas of Ottawa-Gatineau, Moncton, Sudbury and Montréal.

    Release date: 2010-01-26

  • Public use microdata: 89M0028X
    Description:

    This survey pertains to the vitality of Canada's official-language minorities, namely English-speakers in Quebec and French-speakers outside Quebec. The information collected allows for a more in-depth understanding of the current situation of individuals who belong to these groups on priority issues such as instruction in the language of the minority or access to different services in the language of the minority (i.e., health care), as well as language practices both at home and outside of the home.

    The survey's target population consists of two groups: persons under the age of 18 in households where at least one parent belongs to the official-language minority and persons aged 18 and over who belong to the official-language minority in the ten provinces and the three territories. Persons living in collective dwellings and on Indian reserves are excluded.

    Release date: 2009-07-21

  • Table: 97-555-X2006051
    Description:

    As with the 2001 Census, the 2006 Census has made it possible to collect data on languages used at work. The statistical analysis of these data aims to measure the use of English, French and non-official languages in the labour market across the country. Particular attention is paid to allophone immigrant workers and to anglophone and francophone workers in Quebec, in order to establish whether English or French predominates on the job. Moreover, we also compare data on mother tongue, home language and the use of languages at work. The use of languages other than English or French by allophones in the metropolitan areas of Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver is also discussed. In addition, analysis will cover the use of French at work by Francophones living outside Quebec. The use of French at work by workers employed in the Montréal metropolitan area is compared with the use of French at home by workers residing in that same area.

    Release date: 2008-03-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 97-555-P
    Description:

    These guides provide information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-01-09

  • Table: 91-548-X
    Description:

    This survey pertains to the vitality of Canada's official-language minorities, namely anglophones in Quebec and francophones outside of Quebec. The information collected allows for a more in-depth understanding of the current situation of individuals who belong to these groups on subjects as diverse as instruction in the language of the minority or access to different services in the language of the minority (i.e., health care), as well as language practices both at home and outside of the home. Note to readers

    The following section has been modified as of May 27, 2008:Section 5.1.3 Reasons for choosing the school attended:Percentages in paragraphs 3 and 4Edition 2006 was previously released on December 11, 2007.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005029
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The system of postsecondary education in Manitoba plays an important role in the social and economic health of the province. Colleges and universities strive to meet the lifelong learning needs of Manitobans and to ensure the availability of individuals with the right skills to support a growing and changing economy.

    This report uses data from the National Graduates Survey (Class of 2000) and asks who are the graduates of Manitoba's universities and colleges, what do they do after graduation, and how well do they integrate into the labour market? In particular, the report provides a portrait of the graduates from Manitoba's postsecondary institutions, analyses the mobility of students and graduates into and out of the province, looks at graduates' outcomes in the work force, and examines the student debt load of graduates. In addition, the report includes a special analysis of Aboriginal graduates.

    Release date: 2005-05-18

  • 10. I am Canadian Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047774
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The people of Canada have a long tradition of identifying themselves according to the land or nation of their sometimes remote ancestors. Over the past few decades, however, a rapidly growing number have begun describing themselves in the census as Canadians. The proportion of the population claiming some element of Canadian ethno-cultural ancestry climbed from fewer than 1% in 1986 to nearly 40% in 2001, making it by far the most common ethno-cultural ancestry reported on the census.

    Using data from the censuses of population, this article explores the potential reasons behind these changes. It begins by discussing our understanding of ethnicity and how it has changed over time. The article then reviews some of the meanings attached specifically to Canadian ethnicity and follows by examining the characteristics of individuals who, according to the 2001 Census, reported having a Canadian ethnic background.

    Release date: 2005-03-08
Data (13)

Data (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Public use microdata: 89M0028X
    Description:

    This survey pertains to the vitality of Canada's official-language minorities, namely English-speakers in Quebec and French-speakers outside Quebec. The information collected allows for a more in-depth understanding of the current situation of individuals who belong to these groups on priority issues such as instruction in the language of the minority or access to different services in the language of the minority (i.e., health care), as well as language practices both at home and outside of the home.

    The survey's target population consists of two groups: persons under the age of 18 in households where at least one parent belongs to the official-language minority and persons aged 18 and over who belong to the official-language minority in the ten provinces and the three territories. Persons living in collective dwellings and on Indian reserves are excluded.

    Release date: 2009-07-21

  • Table: 97-555-X2006051
    Description:

    As with the 2001 Census, the 2006 Census has made it possible to collect data on languages used at work. The statistical analysis of these data aims to measure the use of English, French and non-official languages in the labour market across the country. Particular attention is paid to allophone immigrant workers and to anglophone and francophone workers in Quebec, in order to establish whether English or French predominates on the job. Moreover, we also compare data on mother tongue, home language and the use of languages at work. The use of languages other than English or French by allophones in the metropolitan areas of Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver is also discussed. In addition, analysis will cover the use of French at work by Francophones living outside Quebec. The use of French at work by workers employed in the Montréal metropolitan area is compared with the use of French at home by workers residing in that same area.

    Release date: 2008-03-11

  • Table: 91-548-X
    Description:

    This survey pertains to the vitality of Canada's official-language minorities, namely anglophones in Quebec and francophones outside of Quebec. The information collected allows for a more in-depth understanding of the current situation of individuals who belong to these groups on subjects as diverse as instruction in the language of the minority or access to different services in the language of the minority (i.e., health care), as well as language practices both at home and outside of the home. Note to readers

    The following section has been modified as of May 27, 2008:Section 5.1.3 Reasons for choosing the school attended:Percentages in paragraphs 3 and 4Edition 2006 was previously released on December 11, 2007.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Table: 95F0335X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Language Composition of Canada," which presents 2001 Census data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French and non-official languages. These data were collected for a sample comprising 20% of the Canadian population.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-13

  • Table: 95F0338X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Language Composition of Canada," which presents 2001 Census data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French and non-official languages. These data were collected for a sample comprising 20% of the Canadian population.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-03-13

  • Table: 97F0007X2001045
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Language Composition of Canada," which presents 2001 Census data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French and non-official languages. These data were collected for a sample comprising 20% of the Canadian population.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0007XIE2001045.

    Release date: 2003-02-12

  • Table: 97F0007X2001001
    Description:

    This table is part of the 2001 Census topic "Language Composition of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French and non-official languages. These data were collected for a sample comprising 20% of the Canadian population.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Language Composition of Canada, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0007XCB2001000

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0007XIE2001001.

    Release date: 2002-12-10

  • Table: 97F0007X2001002
    Description:

    This table is part of the 2001 Census topic "Language Composition of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French and non-official languages. These data were collected for a sample comprising 20% of the Canadian population.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Language Composition of Canada, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0007XCB2001000

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0007XIE2001002.

    Release date: 2002-12-10

  • Table: 97F0007X2001004
    Description:

    This table is part of the 2001 Census topic "Language Composition of Canada," which shows data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French, and non-official languages. These data were collected for a sample comprising 20% of the Canadian population.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Language Composition of Canada, 2001 Census - Catalogue No. 97F0007XCB2001000

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0007XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2002-12-10

  • Table: 97F0007X2001005
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Language Composition of Canada," which presents 2001 Census data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French and non-official languages. These data were collected for a sample comprising 20% of the Canadian population.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Language Composition of Canada, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0007XCB2001000

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0007XIE2001005.

    Release date: 2002-12-10
Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100014
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2006 and 2016 censuses of population, as well as integrated census data from 2006 and 2016, to examine the characteristics associated with English-French bilingualism among Canadian children and youth who were aged 5 to 17 in 2006. The study also examines the factors associated with the acquisition and retention of English-French bilingualism among children and youth in Quebec and in Canada outside Quebec.

    Release date: 2019-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011090
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Not all high school graduates who attend a post-secondary institution go immediately after completing their diploma. An ever-increasing number of Canadian youth choose to remain out of the education system for a period of time prior to re-entering. A great deal of what we know about a gap year comes from other countries, particularly the United Kingdom. Who delays and for how long are, however, two questions that remain to be answered in the Canadian context. The current paper uses all five cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to address the scant attention paid in the Canadian literature to the delay of the start of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Kaplan Meier results show that the median length of time between high school graduation and start of the first post-secondary (PSE) program is 4 months; however, this appears to be substantially longer for males, First Nations youth, Anglophones, youth from Ontario and youth whose parents have low levels of educational attainment. Equally influential were characteristics during the high school years. For example, youth with low marks, who worked many hours in paid employment while in high school, who skipped classes regularly, who took part in a lot of extracurricular activities not organized by the school, and whose close friends said they were not planning on going to PSE had median gap times between high school graduation and the start of postsecondary studies that were much longer than the average. Cox Proportional Hazard models confirm the robustness of several of the descriptive findings, including the effects of gender, province of high school, parental education, working during high school, marks, extracurricular activities, and the education plans of close friends.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2010002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the English-speaking population in Quebec was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Justice Canada. It is one of eleven such portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Quebec based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2010-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111074
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This article looks at the prevalence of French-language knowledge among sales and service workers (salespersons, food servers, cashiers). Information is also provided regarding their use of French at work. There is a special focus on the metropolitan areas of Ottawa-Gatineau, Moncton, Sudbury and Montréal.

    Release date: 2010-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005029
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The system of postsecondary education in Manitoba plays an important role in the social and economic health of the province. Colleges and universities strive to meet the lifelong learning needs of Manitobans and to ensure the availability of individuals with the right skills to support a growing and changing economy.

    This report uses data from the National Graduates Survey (Class of 2000) and asks who are the graduates of Manitoba's universities and colleges, what do they do after graduation, and how well do they integrate into the labour market? In particular, the report provides a portrait of the graduates from Manitoba's postsecondary institutions, analyses the mobility of students and graduates into and out of the province, looks at graduates' outcomes in the work force, and examines the student debt load of graduates. In addition, the report includes a special analysis of Aboriginal graduates.

    Release date: 2005-05-18

  • 6. I am Canadian Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047774
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The people of Canada have a long tradition of identifying themselves according to the land or nation of their sometimes remote ancestors. Over the past few decades, however, a rapidly growing number have begun describing themselves in the census as Canadians. The proportion of the population claiming some element of Canadian ethno-cultural ancestry climbed from fewer than 1% in 1986 to nearly 40% in 2001, making it by far the most common ethno-cultural ancestry reported on the census.

    Using data from the censuses of population, this article explores the potential reasons behind these changes. It begins by discussing our understanding of ethnicity and how it has changed over time. The article then reviews some of the meanings attached specifically to Canadian ethnicity and follows by examining the characteristics of individuals who, according to the 2001 Census, reported having a Canadian ethnic background.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 96-326-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This work is an updated version of a study published under the same title following the population censuses of 1991 and 1996. The text and tables have been adapted to reflect the more complete data from the 2001 Census, in which the usual questions on knowledge of languages, mother tongue, and language spoken 'most often' at home are supplemented by a question on languages spoken 'regularly' at home , and a two-part question on language use at work, that is, the language used 'most often,' and other languages used 'regularly,' in the workplace. This enrichment of the content has allowed us to expand our analysis while remaining true to the initial goal of presenting in a straightfoward manner basic statistics on the country's demolinguistic reality.

    Release date: 2004-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004229
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines trends in the internal migration of the Canadian-born and long-term immigrants into and out of Canada's three largest metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036701
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines how the educational profiles of francophones, anglophones and allophones have changed over the past 30 years, and the factors that have contributed to many of these changes.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001011
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2001 Census has made it possible, for the first time, to establish statistics on languages used at work. The analysis of these statistics aims to evaluate, for allophone immigrants in the labour market across the country, the use of English, French and non-official languages. Particular attention is paid to allophone immigrant workers and to anglophone and francophone workers in the province of Quebec, in order to establish whether English or French predominates on the job. The use of languages other than English or French by allophones in the metropolitan areas of Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver is also discussed. In addition, analysis will cover the use of French at work by francophones living outside Quebec. The use of French at work by persons employed in the area referred to as the "Communauté urbaine de Montréal" (i.e., the Montréal area) is compared with the use of French at home by persons residing in that same area.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-02-11
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 97-555-P
    Description:

    These guides provide information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-01-09
Date modified: