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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 84-538-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This document presents the methodology underlying the production of the life tables for Canada, provinces and territories, from reference period 1980/1982 and onward.

    Release date: 2018-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154927
    Description:

    Benchmarking monthly or quarterly series to annual data is a common practice in many National Statistical Institutes. The benchmarking problem arises when time series data for the same target variable are measured at different frequencies and there is a need to remove discrepancies between the sums of the sub-annual values and their annual benchmarks. Several benchmarking methods are available in the literature. The Growth Rates Preservation (GRP) benchmarking procedure is often considered the best method. It is often claimed that this procedure is grounded on an ideal movement preservation principle. However, we show that there are important drawbacks to GRP, relevant for practical applications, that are unknown in the literature. Alternative benchmarking models will be considered that do not suffer from some of GRP’s side effects.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018016
    Description:

    Record linkage has been identified as a potential mechanism to add treatment information to the Canadian Cancer Registry (CCR). The purpose of the Canadian Cancer Treatment Linkage Project (CCTLP) pilot is to add surgical treatment data to the CCR. The Discharge Abstract Database (DAD) and the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS) were linked to the CCR, and surgical treatment data were extracted. The project was funded through the Cancer Data Development Initiative (CDDI) of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC).

    The CCTLP was developed as a feasibility study in which patient records from the CCR would be linked to surgical treatment records in the DAD and NACRS databases, maintained by the Canadian Institute for Health Information. The target cohort to whom surgical treatment data would be linked was patients aged 19 or older registered on the CCR (2010 through 2012). The linkage was completed in Statistics Canada’s Social Data Linkage Environment (SDLE).

    Release date: 2018-03-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-633-X
    Description: Papers in this series provide background discussions of the methods used to develop data for economic, health, and social analytical studies at Statistics Canada. They are intended to provide readers with information on the statistical methods, standards and definitions used to develop databases for research purposes. All papers in this series have undergone peer and institutional review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.
    Release date: 2018-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018015
    Description:

    This paper discusses the process for estimating the volume of cannabis consumption in Canada by age group from 1960 to 2015. Cannabis consumption is estimated using a model that first estimates the number of cannabis consumers among 15- to 17-year-olds, 18- to 24-year-olds, 25- to 44-year-olds and 45- to 64-year-olds. This is accomplished by estimating cannabis consumption prevalence based on multiple survey data sources. For each age group, consumers are divided into categories based on annual frequency of consumption: once in the past year, less than once a month, one to three times a month, weekly (excluding daily) and daily. Each category of frequency of consumption is then associated with a quantity of cannabis consumed.

    Release date: 2018-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018014
    Description:

    The Canadian Mortality Database (CMDB) is an administrative database that collects information on cause of death from all provincial and territorial vital statistics registries in Canada. The CMDB lacks subpopulation identifiers to examine mortality rates and disparities among groups such as First Nations, Métis, Inuit and members of visible minority groups. Linkage between the CMDB and the Census of Population is an approach to circumvent this limitation. This report describes a linkage between the CMDB (2006 to 2011) and the 2006 Census of Population, which was carried out using hierarchical deterministic exact matching, with a focus on methodology and validation.

    Release date: 2018-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018013
    Description:

    Since 2008, a number of population censuses have been linked to administrative health data and to financial data. These linked datasets have been instrumental in examining health inequalities and have been used in environmental health research. This paper describes the creation of the 1996 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC)—3.57 million respondents to the census long-form questionnaire who were retrospectively followed for mortality and mobility for 16.6 years from 1996 to 2012. The 1996 CanCHEC was limited to census respondents who were aged 19 or older on Census Day (May 14, 1996), were residents of Canada, were not residents of institutions, and had filed an income tax return. These respondents were linked to death records from the Canadian Mortality Database or to the T1 Personal Master File, and to a postal code history from a variety of sources. This is the third in a set of CanCHECs that, when combined, make it possible to examine mortality trends and environmental exposures by socioeconomic characteristics over three census cycles and 21 years of census, tax, and mortality data. This report describes linkage methodologies, validation and bias assessment, and the characteristics of the 1996 CanCHEC. Representativeness of the 1996 CanCHEC relative to the adult population of Canada is also assessed.

    Release date: 2018-01-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201735217723
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017077
    Description:

    On April 13, 2017, the Government of Canada tabled legislation to legalize the recreational use of cannabis by adults. This will directly impact Canada’s statistical system. The focus of this Economic Insights article is to provide experimental estimates for the volume of cannabis consumption, based on existing information on the prevalence of cannabis use. The article presents experimental estimates of the number of tonnes of cannabis consumed by age group for the period from 1960 to 2015. The experimental estimates rely on survey data from multiple sources, statistical techniques to link the sources over time, and assumptions about consumption behaviour. They are subject to revision as improved or additional data sources become available.

    Release date: 2017-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2017009
    Description:

    Seasonal adjustment is a statistical technique used to remove fluctuations in economic data that occur every year at the same time and in a similar fashion. This video provides an overview of seasonal adjustment, how it is used and how it affects the economy.

    Release date: 2017-11-22
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  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154927
    Description:

    Benchmarking monthly or quarterly series to annual data is a common practice in many National Statistical Institutes. The benchmarking problem arises when time series data for the same target variable are measured at different frequencies and there is a need to remove discrepancies between the sums of the sub-annual values and their annual benchmarks. Several benchmarking methods are available in the literature. The Growth Rates Preservation (GRP) benchmarking procedure is often considered the best method. It is often claimed that this procedure is grounded on an ideal movement preservation principle. However, we show that there are important drawbacks to GRP, relevant for practical applications, that are unknown in the literature. Alternative benchmarking models will be considered that do not suffer from some of GRP’s side effects.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018016
    Description:

    Record linkage has been identified as a potential mechanism to add treatment information to the Canadian Cancer Registry (CCR). The purpose of the Canadian Cancer Treatment Linkage Project (CCTLP) pilot is to add surgical treatment data to the CCR. The Discharge Abstract Database (DAD) and the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS) were linked to the CCR, and surgical treatment data were extracted. The project was funded through the Cancer Data Development Initiative (CDDI) of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC).

    The CCTLP was developed as a feasibility study in which patient records from the CCR would be linked to surgical treatment records in the DAD and NACRS databases, maintained by the Canadian Institute for Health Information. The target cohort to whom surgical treatment data would be linked was patients aged 19 or older registered on the CCR (2010 through 2012). The linkage was completed in Statistics Canada’s Social Data Linkage Environment (SDLE).

    Release date: 2018-03-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-633-X
    Description: Papers in this series provide background discussions of the methods used to develop data for economic, health, and social analytical studies at Statistics Canada. They are intended to provide readers with information on the statistical methods, standards and definitions used to develop databases for research purposes. All papers in this series have undergone peer and institutional review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.
    Release date: 2018-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018015
    Description:

    This paper discusses the process for estimating the volume of cannabis consumption in Canada by age group from 1960 to 2015. Cannabis consumption is estimated using a model that first estimates the number of cannabis consumers among 15- to 17-year-olds, 18- to 24-year-olds, 25- to 44-year-olds and 45- to 64-year-olds. This is accomplished by estimating cannabis consumption prevalence based on multiple survey data sources. For each age group, consumers are divided into categories based on annual frequency of consumption: once in the past year, less than once a month, one to three times a month, weekly (excluding daily) and daily. Each category of frequency of consumption is then associated with a quantity of cannabis consumed.

    Release date: 2018-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018014
    Description:

    The Canadian Mortality Database (CMDB) is an administrative database that collects information on cause of death from all provincial and territorial vital statistics registries in Canada. The CMDB lacks subpopulation identifiers to examine mortality rates and disparities among groups such as First Nations, Métis, Inuit and members of visible minority groups. Linkage between the CMDB and the Census of Population is an approach to circumvent this limitation. This report describes a linkage between the CMDB (2006 to 2011) and the 2006 Census of Population, which was carried out using hierarchical deterministic exact matching, with a focus on methodology and validation.

    Release date: 2018-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018013
    Description:

    Since 2008, a number of population censuses have been linked to administrative health data and to financial data. These linked datasets have been instrumental in examining health inequalities and have been used in environmental health research. This paper describes the creation of the 1996 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC)—3.57 million respondents to the census long-form questionnaire who were retrospectively followed for mortality and mobility for 16.6 years from 1996 to 2012. The 1996 CanCHEC was limited to census respondents who were aged 19 or older on Census Day (May 14, 1996), were residents of Canada, were not residents of institutions, and had filed an income tax return. These respondents were linked to death records from the Canadian Mortality Database or to the T1 Personal Master File, and to a postal code history from a variety of sources. This is the third in a set of CanCHECs that, when combined, make it possible to examine mortality trends and environmental exposures by socioeconomic characteristics over three census cycles and 21 years of census, tax, and mortality data. This report describes linkage methodologies, validation and bias assessment, and the characteristics of the 1996 CanCHEC. Representativeness of the 1996 CanCHEC relative to the adult population of Canada is also assessed.

    Release date: 2018-01-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201735217723
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017077
    Description:

    On April 13, 2017, the Government of Canada tabled legislation to legalize the recreational use of cannabis by adults. This will directly impact Canada’s statistical system. The focus of this Economic Insights article is to provide experimental estimates for the volume of cannabis consumption, based on existing information on the prevalence of cannabis use. The article presents experimental estimates of the number of tonnes of cannabis consumed by age group for the period from 1960 to 2015. The experimental estimates rely on survey data from multiple sources, statistical techniques to link the sources over time, and assumptions about consumption behaviour. They are subject to revision as improved or additional data sources become available.

    Release date: 2017-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-629-X2017009
    Description:

    Seasonal adjustment is a statistical technique used to remove fluctuations in economic data that occur every year at the same time and in a similar fashion. This video provides an overview of seasonal adjustment, how it is used and how it affects the economy.

    Release date: 2017-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017399
    Description:

    Canada is a trading nation that produces significant quantities of resource outputs. Consequently, the behaviour of resource prices that are important for Canada is germane to understanding the progress of real income growth and the prosperity of the country and the provinces. Demand and supply shocks or changes in monetary policy in international markets may exert significant influence on resource prices, and their fluctuations constitute an important avenue for the transmission of external shocks into the domestic economy. This paper develops historical estimates of the Bank of Canada commodity price index (BCPI) and links them to modern estimates. Using a collection of historical data sources, it estimates weights and prices sufficiently consistently to merit the construction of long-run estimates that may be linked to the modern Fisher BCPI.

    Release date: 2017-10-11
Reference (11)

Reference (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 84-538-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This document presents the methodology underlying the production of the life tables for Canada, provinces and territories, from reference period 1980/1982 and onward.

    Release date: 2018-06-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 82-225-X200701010508
    Description:

    The Record Linkage Overview describes the process used in annual internal record linkage of the Canadian Cancer Registry. The steps include: preparation; pre-processing; record linkage; post-processing; analysis and resolution; resolution entry; and, resolution processing.

    Release date: 2008-01-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20050019476
    Description:

    The paper will show how, using data published by Statistics Canada and available from member libraries of the CREPUQ, a linkage approach using postal codes makes it possible to link the data from the outcomes file to a set of contextual variables. These variables could then contribute to producing, on an exploratory basis, a better index to explain the varied outcomes of students from schools. In terms of the impact, the proposed index could show more effectively the limitations of ranking students and schools when this information is not given sufficient weight.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 68-514-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's approach to gathering and disseminating economic data has developed over several decades into a highly integrated system for collection and estimation that feeds the framework of the Canadian System of National Accounts.

    The key to this approach was creation of the Unified Enterprise Survey, the goal of which was to improve the consistency, coherence, breadth and depth of business survey data.

    The UES did so by bringing many of Statistics Canada's individual annual business surveys under a common framework. This framework included a single survey frame, a sample design framework, conceptual harmonization of survey content, means of using relevant administrative data, common data collection, processing and analysis tools, and a common data warehouse.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-612-X
    Description:

    This paper describes the structure and linkage of two databases: the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), and the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB). The combined data associate landed immigrant taxfilers on the LAD with their key characteristics upon immigration. The paper highlights how the combined information, referred to here as the LAD_IMDB, enhances and complements the existing separate databases. The paper compares the full IMDB file with the sample of immigrants to assess the representativeness of the sample file.

    Release date: 2004-01-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X20030016609
    Description:

    To automate the data editing process the so-called error localization problem, i.e., the problem of identifying the erroneous fields in an erroneous record, has to be solved. A paradigm for identifying errors automatically has been proposed by Fellegi and Holt in 1976. Over the years their paradigm has been generalized to: the data of a record should be made to satisfy all edits by changing the values of the variables with the smallest possible sum of reliability weights. A reliability weight of a variable is a non-negative number that expresses how reliable one considers the value of this variable to be. Given this paradigm the resulting mathematical problem has to be solved. In the present paper we examine how vertex generation methods can be used to solve this mathematical problem in mixed data, i.e., a combination of categorical (discrete) and numerical (continuous) data. The main aim of this paper is not to present new results, but rather to combine the ideas of several other papers in order to give a "complete", self-contained description of the use of vertex generation methods to solve the error localization problem in mixed data. In our exposition we will focus on describing how methods for numerical data can be adapted to mixed data.

    Release date: 2003-07-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-595-M2003005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper develops technical procedures that may enable ministries of education to link provincial tests with national and international tests in order to compare standards and report results on a common scale.

    Release date: 2003-05-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-602-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of existing methods and techniques making use of personal identifiers to support record linkage. Record linkage can be loosely defined as a methodology for manipulating and / or transforming personal identifiers from individual data records from one or more operational databases and subsequently attempting to match these personal identifiers to create a composite record about an individual. Record linkage is not intended to uniquely identify individuals for operational purposes; however, it does provide probabilistic matches of varying degrees of reliability for use in statistical reporting. Techniques employed in record linkage may also be of use for investigative purposes to help narrow the field of search against existing databases when some form of personal identification information exists.

    Release date: 2000-12-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980013910
    Description:

    Let A be a population domain of interest and assume that the elements of A cannot be identified on the sampling frame and the number of elements in A is not known. Further assume that a sample of fixed size (say n) is selected from the entire frame and the resulting domain sample size (say n_A) is random. The problem addressed is the construction of a confidence interval for a domain parameter such as the domain aggregate T_A = \sum_{i \in A} x_i. The usual approach to this problem is to redefine x_i, by setting x_i = 0 if i \notin A. Thus, the construction of a confidence interval for the domain total is recast as the construction of a confidence interval for a population total which can be addressed (at least asymptotically in n) by normal theory. As an alternative, we condition on n_A and construct confidence intervals which have approximately nominal coverage under certain assumptions regarding the domain population. We evaluate the new approach empirically using artificial populations and data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Occupational Compensation Survey.

    Release date: 1998-07-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19970023613
    Description:

    Many policy decisions are best made when there is supporting statistical evidence based on analyses of appropriate microdata. Sometimes all the needed data exist but reside in multiple files for which common identifiers (e.g., SIN's, EIN's, or SSN's) are unavailable. This paper demonstrates a methodology for analyzing two such files: (1) when there is common nonunique information subject to significant error and (2) when each source file contains uncommon quantitative data that can be connected with appropriate models. Such a situation might arise with files of businesses only having difficult-to-use name and address information in common, one file with the energy products consumed by the companies, and the other file containing the types and amounts of goods they produce. Another situation might arise with files on individuals in which one file has earnings data, another information about health-related expenses, and a third information about receipts of supplemental payments. The goal of the methodology presented is to produce valid statistical analyses; appropriate microdata files may or may not be produced.

    Release date: 1998-03-12
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