Response and nonresponse

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (141)

All (141) (0 to 10 of 141 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202400100009
    Description: Our comments respond to discussion from Sen, Brick, and Elliott. We weigh the potential upside and downside of Sen’s suggestion of using machine learning to identify bogus respondents through interactions and improbable combinations of variables. We join Brick in reflecting on bogus respondents’ impact on the state of commercial nonprobability surveys. Finally, we consider Elliott’s discussion of solutions to the challenge raised in our study.
    Release date: 2024-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202400100010
    Description: This discussion summarizes the interesting new findings around measurement errors in opt-in surveys by Kennedy, Mercer and Lau (KML). While KML enlighten readers about “bogus responding” and possible patterns in them, this discussion suggests combining these new-found results with other avenues of research in nonprobability sampling, such as improvement of representativeness.
    Release date: 2024-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202400100011
    Description: Kennedy, Mercer, and Lau explore misreporting by respondents in non-probability samples and discover a new feature, namely that of deliberate misreporting of demographic characteristics. This finding suggests that the “arms race” between researchers and those determined to disrupt the practice of social science is not over and researchers need to account for such respondents if using high-quality probability surveys to help reduce error in non-probability samples.
    Release date: 2024-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202400100012
    Description: Nonprobability samples are quick and low-cost and have become popular for some types of survey research. Kennedy, Mercer and Lau examine data quality issues associated with opt-in nonprobability samples frequently used in the United States. They show that the estimates from these samples have serious problems that go beyond representativeness. A total survey error perspective is important for evaluating all types of surveys.
    Release date: 2024-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202400100013
    Description: Statistical approaches developed for nonprobability samples generally focus on nonrandom selection as the primary reason survey respondents might differ systematically from the target population. Well-established theory states that in these instances, by conditioning on the necessary auxiliary variables, selection can be rendered ignorable and survey estimates will be free of bias. But this logic rests on the assumption that measurement error is nonexistent or small. In this study we test this assumption in two ways. First, we use a large benchmarking study to identify subgroups for which errors in commercial, online nonprobability samples are especially large in ways that are unlikely due to selection effects. Then we present a follow-up study examining one cause of the large errors: bogus responding (i.e., survey answers that are fraudulent, mischievous or otherwise insincere). We find that bogus responding, particularly among respondents identifying as young or Hispanic, is a significant and widespread problem in commercial, online nonprobability samples, at least in the United States. This research highlights the need for statisticians working with commercial nonprobability samples to address bogus responding and issues of representativeness – not just the latter.
    Release date: 2024-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-005-M2024001
    Description: From 2010 to 2019, the Labour Force Survey (LFS) response rate – or the proportion of selected households who complete an LFS interview – had been on a slow downward trend, due to a range of social and technological changes which have made it more challenging to contact selected households and to persuade Canadians to participate when they are contacted. These factors were exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in the suspension of face-to-face interviewing between April 2020 and fall 2022. Statistics Canada is committed to restoring LFS response rates to the greatest extent possible. This technical paper discusses two initiatives that are underway to ensure that the LFS estimates continue to provide an accurate and representative portrait of the Canadian labour market.
    Release date: 2024-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202300200006
    Description: Survey researchers are increasingly turning to multimode data collection to deal with declines in survey response rates and increasing costs. An efficient approach offers the less costly modes (e.g., web) followed with a more expensive mode for a subsample of the units (e.g., households) within each primary sampling unit (PSU). We present two alternatives to this traditional design. One alternative subsamples PSUs rather than units to constrain costs. The second is a hybrid design that includes a clustered (two-stage) sample and an independent, unclustered sample. Using a simulation, we demonstrate the hybrid design has considerable advantages.
    Release date: 2024-01-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-005-M2023001
    Description: This document provides information on the evolution of response rates for the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and a discussion of the evaluation of two aspects of data quality that ensure the LFS estimates continue providing an accurate portrait of the Canadian labour market.
    Release date: 2023-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2022001
    Description:

    This report explores the size and nature of the attrition challenges faced by the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) survey, as well as the use of a non-response weight adjustment and calibration strategy to mitigate the effects of attrition on the LISA estimates. The study focuses on data from waves 1 (2012) to 4 (2018) and uses practical examples based on selected demographic variables, to illustrate how attrition be assessed and treated.

    Release date: 2022-11-14

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202231822683
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2022-11-14
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (140)

Analysis (140) (0 to 10 of 140 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202400100009
    Description: Our comments respond to discussion from Sen, Brick, and Elliott. We weigh the potential upside and downside of Sen’s suggestion of using machine learning to identify bogus respondents through interactions and improbable combinations of variables. We join Brick in reflecting on bogus respondents’ impact on the state of commercial nonprobability surveys. Finally, we consider Elliott’s discussion of solutions to the challenge raised in our study.
    Release date: 2024-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202400100010
    Description: This discussion summarizes the interesting new findings around measurement errors in opt-in surveys by Kennedy, Mercer and Lau (KML). While KML enlighten readers about “bogus responding” and possible patterns in them, this discussion suggests combining these new-found results with other avenues of research in nonprobability sampling, such as improvement of representativeness.
    Release date: 2024-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202400100011
    Description: Kennedy, Mercer, and Lau explore misreporting by respondents in non-probability samples and discover a new feature, namely that of deliberate misreporting of demographic characteristics. This finding suggests that the “arms race” between researchers and those determined to disrupt the practice of social science is not over and researchers need to account for such respondents if using high-quality probability surveys to help reduce error in non-probability samples.
    Release date: 2024-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202400100012
    Description: Nonprobability samples are quick and low-cost and have become popular for some types of survey research. Kennedy, Mercer and Lau examine data quality issues associated with opt-in nonprobability samples frequently used in the United States. They show that the estimates from these samples have serious problems that go beyond representativeness. A total survey error perspective is important for evaluating all types of surveys.
    Release date: 2024-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202400100013
    Description: Statistical approaches developed for nonprobability samples generally focus on nonrandom selection as the primary reason survey respondents might differ systematically from the target population. Well-established theory states that in these instances, by conditioning on the necessary auxiliary variables, selection can be rendered ignorable and survey estimates will be free of bias. But this logic rests on the assumption that measurement error is nonexistent or small. In this study we test this assumption in two ways. First, we use a large benchmarking study to identify subgroups for which errors in commercial, online nonprobability samples are especially large in ways that are unlikely due to selection effects. Then we present a follow-up study examining one cause of the large errors: bogus responding (i.e., survey answers that are fraudulent, mischievous or otherwise insincere). We find that bogus responding, particularly among respondents identifying as young or Hispanic, is a significant and widespread problem in commercial, online nonprobability samples, at least in the United States. This research highlights the need for statisticians working with commercial nonprobability samples to address bogus responding and issues of representativeness – not just the latter.
    Release date: 2024-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-005-M2024001
    Description: From 2010 to 2019, the Labour Force Survey (LFS) response rate – or the proportion of selected households who complete an LFS interview – had been on a slow downward trend, due to a range of social and technological changes which have made it more challenging to contact selected households and to persuade Canadians to participate when they are contacted. These factors were exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in the suspension of face-to-face interviewing between April 2020 and fall 2022. Statistics Canada is committed to restoring LFS response rates to the greatest extent possible. This technical paper discusses two initiatives that are underway to ensure that the LFS estimates continue to provide an accurate and representative portrait of the Canadian labour market.
    Release date: 2024-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202300200006
    Description: Survey researchers are increasingly turning to multimode data collection to deal with declines in survey response rates and increasing costs. An efficient approach offers the less costly modes (e.g., web) followed with a more expensive mode for a subsample of the units (e.g., households) within each primary sampling unit (PSU). We present two alternatives to this traditional design. One alternative subsamples PSUs rather than units to constrain costs. The second is a hybrid design that includes a clustered (two-stage) sample and an independent, unclustered sample. Using a simulation, we demonstrate the hybrid design has considerable advantages.
    Release date: 2024-01-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2022001
    Description:

    This report explores the size and nature of the attrition challenges faced by the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) survey, as well as the use of a non-response weight adjustment and calibration strategy to mitigate the effects of attrition on the LISA estimates. The study focuses on data from waves 1 (2012) to 4 (2018) and uses practical examples based on selected demographic variables, to illustrate how attrition be assessed and treated.

    Release date: 2022-11-14

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202231822683
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2022-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X202200100001
    Description:

    In this study, we investigate to what extent the respondent characteristics age and educational level may be associated with undesirable answer behaviour (UAB) consistently across surveys. We use data from panel respondents who participated in ten general population surveys of CentERdata and Statistics Netherlands. A new method to visually present UAB and an inventive adaptation of a non-parametric effect size measure are used. The occurrence of UAB of respondents with specific characteristics is summarized in density distributions that we refer to as respondent profiles. An adaptation of the robust effect size Cliff’s Delta is used to compare respondent profiles on the potentially consistent occurrence of UAB across surveys. Taking all surveys together, the degree of UAB varies by age and education. The results do not show consistent UAB across individual surveys: Age and educational level are associated with a relatively higher occurrence of UAB for some surveys, but a relatively lower occurrence for other surveys. We conclude that the occurrence of UAB across surveys may be more dependent on the survey and its items than on respondent’s cognitive ability.

    Release date: 2022-06-21
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-005-M2023001
    Description: This document provides information on the evolution of response rates for the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and a discussion of the evaluation of two aspects of data quality that ensure the LFS estimates continue providing an accurate portrait of the Canadian labour market.
    Release date: 2023-10-30
Date modified: