Collection and questionnaires

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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154979
    Description:

    In anticipation of legislation (Bill C-45) legalizing cannabis for non medical use coming into force, Statistics Canada has undertaken a thorough review of its capability to evaluate the bill’s impact. This document focuses on the agency’s social statistics system—specifically, surveys and administrative databases designed to collect information related to health and health care; law enforcement; the justice system and community safety and well-being; education; and labour.

    Release date: 2018-10-12

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201828519106
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201800154973
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides information on the collection, through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, of unfounded criminal incidents in Canada, including sexual assaults. It will provide background on the collection of these data and an overview of the actions taken by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics - a division at Statistics Canada - and the Police Information and Statistics Committee of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police to revise the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey to address data quality and reporting issues, and to reinstate collection of information on unfounded criminal incidents.

    Release date: 2018-07-12

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018023
    Description:

    This infographic denotes the process taken by Statistics Canada in collaboration with data providers and other stakeholders to review and standardize the collection of data on unfounded incidents through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, and the release of data to the public.

    Release date: 2018-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700114836
    Description:

    Web-push survey data collection that uses mail contact to request responses over the Internet, while withholding alternative answering modes until later in the implementation process, has developed rapidly over the past decade. This paper describes the reasons this innovative mixing of survey contact and response modes was needed, the primary ones being the declining effectiveness of voice telephone and slower than expected development of email/web only data collection methods. Historical and institutional barriers to mixing survey modes in this manner are also discussed. Essential research on the use of U.S. Postal address lists and the effects of aural and visual communication on survey measurement are then described followed by discussion of experimental efforts to create a viable web-push methodology as an alternative to voice telephone and mail response surveys. Multiple examples of current and anticipated web-push data collection uses are provided. This paper ends with a discussion of both the great promise and significant challenge presented by greater reliance on web-push survey methods.

    Release date: 2017-06-22

  • Geographic files and documentation: 12-572-X
    Description:

    The Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) provides a systematic classification structure that categorizes all of the geographic area of Canada. The SGC is the official classification used in the Census of Population and other Statistics Canada surveys.

    The classification is organized in two volumes: Volume I, The Classification and Volume II, Reference Maps.

    Volume II contains reference maps showing boundaries, names, codes and locations of the geographic areas in the classification. The reference maps show census subdivisions, census divisions, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census metropolitan influenced zones and economic regions. Definitions for these terms are found in Volume I, The Classification. Volume I describes the classification and related standard geographic areas and place names.

    The maps in Volume II can be downloaded in PDF format from our website.

    Release date: 2016-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2016001
    Description:

    Linkages between survey and administrative data are an increasingly common practice, due in part to the reduced burden to respondents, and to the data that can be obtained at a relatively low cost. Historical linkage, or the linkage of administrative data from previous years to the year of the survey, compounds these benefits by providing additional years of data. This paper examines the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA), which was linked to historical tax data on personal income tax returns (T1) and those collected from employers’ files (T4), among others not mentioned in this paper. It presents trends in historical linkage rates, compares the coherence of administrative data between the T1 and T4, presents the ability to use the data to create balanced panels, and uses the T1 data to produce age-earnings profiles by sex. The results show that the historical linkage rate is high (over 90% in most cases) and stable over time for respondents who are likely to file a tax return, and that the T1 and T4 administrative sources show similar earnings. Moreover, long balanced panels of up to 30 years in length (at the time of writing) can be created using LISA administrative linkage data.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Notices and consultations: 92-140-X2016001
    Description:

    The 2016 Census Program Content Test was conducted from May 2 to June 30, 2014. The Test was designed to assess the impact of any proposed content changes to the 2016 Census Program and to measure the impact of including a social insurance number (SIN) question on the data quality.

    This quantitative test used a split-panel design involving 55,000 dwellings, divided into 11 panels of 5,000 dwellings each: five panels were dedicated to the Content Test while the remaining six panels were for the SIN Test. Two models of test questionnaires were developed to meet the objectives, namely a model with all the proposed changes EXCEPT the SIN question and a model with all the proposed changes INCLUDING the SIN question. A third model of 'control' questionnaire with the 2011 content was also developed. The population living in a private dwelling in mail-out areas in one of the ten provinces was targeted for the test. Paper and electronic response channels were part of the Test as well.

    This report presents the Test objectives, the design and a summary of the analysis in order to determine potential content for the 2016 Census Program. Results from the data analysis of the Test were not the only elements used to determine the content for 2016. Other elements were also considered, such as response burden, comparison over time and users’ needs.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014706
    Description:

    Over the last decade, Statistics Canada’s Producer Prices Division has expanded its service producer price indexes program and continued to improve its goods and construction producer price indexes program. While the majority of price indexes are based on traditional survey methods, efforts were made to increase the use of administrative data and alternative data sources in order to reduce burden on our respondents. This paper focuses mainly on producer price programs, but also provides information on the growing importance of alternative data sources at Statistics Canada. In addition, it presents the operational challenges and risks that statistical offices could face when relying more and more on third-party outputs. Finally, it presents the tools being developed to integrate alternative data while collecting metadata.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014707
    Description:

    The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a monthly household survey of about 56,000 households that provides information on the Canadian labour market. Audit Trail is a Blaise programming option, for surveys like LFS with Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI), which creates files containing every keystroke and edit and timestamp of every data collection attempt on all households. Combining such a large survey with such a complete source of paradata opens the door to in-depth data quality analysis but also quickly leads to Big Data challenges. How can meaningful information be extracted from this large set of keystrokes and timestamps? How can it help assess the quality of LFS data collection? The presentation will describe some of the challenges that were encountered, solutions that were used to address them, and results of the analysis on data quality.

    Release date: 2016-03-24
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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154979
    Description:

    In anticipation of legislation (Bill C-45) legalizing cannabis for non medical use coming into force, Statistics Canada has undertaken a thorough review of its capability to evaluate the bill’s impact. This document focuses on the agency’s social statistics system—specifically, surveys and administrative databases designed to collect information related to health and health care; law enforcement; the justice system and community safety and well-being; education; and labour.

    Release date: 2018-10-12

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201828519106
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201800154973
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides information on the collection, through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, of unfounded criminal incidents in Canada, including sexual assaults. It will provide background on the collection of these data and an overview of the actions taken by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics - a division at Statistics Canada - and the Police Information and Statistics Committee of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police to revise the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey to address data quality and reporting issues, and to reinstate collection of information on unfounded criminal incidents.

    Release date: 2018-07-12

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018023
    Description:

    This infographic denotes the process taken by Statistics Canada in collaboration with data providers and other stakeholders to review and standardize the collection of data on unfounded incidents through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, and the release of data to the public.

    Release date: 2018-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700114836
    Description:

    Web-push survey data collection that uses mail contact to request responses over the Internet, while withholding alternative answering modes until later in the implementation process, has developed rapidly over the past decade. This paper describes the reasons this innovative mixing of survey contact and response modes was needed, the primary ones being the declining effectiveness of voice telephone and slower than expected development of email/web only data collection methods. Historical and institutional barriers to mixing survey modes in this manner are also discussed. Essential research on the use of U.S. Postal address lists and the effects of aural and visual communication on survey measurement are then described followed by discussion of experimental efforts to create a viable web-push methodology as an alternative to voice telephone and mail response surveys. Multiple examples of current and anticipated web-push data collection uses are provided. This paper ends with a discussion of both the great promise and significant challenge presented by greater reliance on web-push survey methods.

    Release date: 2017-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2016001
    Description:

    Linkages between survey and administrative data are an increasingly common practice, due in part to the reduced burden to respondents, and to the data that can be obtained at a relatively low cost. Historical linkage, or the linkage of administrative data from previous years to the year of the survey, compounds these benefits by providing additional years of data. This paper examines the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA), which was linked to historical tax data on personal income tax returns (T1) and those collected from employers’ files (T4), among others not mentioned in this paper. It presents trends in historical linkage rates, compares the coherence of administrative data between the T1 and T4, presents the ability to use the data to create balanced panels, and uses the T1 data to produce age-earnings profiles by sex. The results show that the historical linkage rate is high (over 90% in most cases) and stable over time for respondents who are likely to file a tax return, and that the T1 and T4 administrative sources show similar earnings. Moreover, long balanced panels of up to 30 years in length (at the time of writing) can be created using LISA administrative linkage data.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014709
    Description:

    Traffic congestion is not limited to large cities but is also becoming a problem in medium-size cities and to roads going through cities. Among a large variety of congestion measures, six were selected for the ease of aggregation and their capacity to use the instantaneous information from CVUS-light component in 2014. From the selected measures, the Index of Congestion is potentially the only one not biased. This measure is used to illustrate different dimension of congestion on the road network.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014744
    Description:

    This presentation will begin with Dr. West providing a summary of research that has been conducted on the quality and utility of paradata collected as part of the United States National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). The NSFG is the major national fertility survey in the U.S., and an important source of data on sexual activity, sexual behavior, and reproductive health for policy makers. For many years, the NSFG has been collecting various forms of paradata, including keystroke information (e.g., Couper and Kreuter 2013), call record information, detailed case disposition information, and interviewer observations related to key NSFG measures (e.g., West 2013). Dr. West will discuss some of the challenges of working with these data, in addition to evidence of their utility for nonresponse adjustment, interviewer evaluation, and/or responsive survey design purposes. Dr. Kreuter will then present research done using paradata collected as part of two panel surveys: the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) in the United States, and the Panel Labour Market and Social Security (PASS) in Germany. In both surveys, information from contacts in prior waves were experimentally used to improve contact and response rates in subsequent waves. In addition, research from PASS will be presented where interviewer observations on key outcome variables were collected to be used in nonresponse adjustment or responsive survey design decisions. Dr. Kreuter will not only present the research results but also the practical challenges in implementing the collection and use of both sets of paradata.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014746
    Description:

    Paradata research has focused on identifying opportunities for strategic improvement in data collection that could be operationally viable and lead to enhancements in quality or cost efficiency. To that end, Statistics Canada has developed and implemented a responsive collection design (RCD) strategy for computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) household surveys to maximize quality and efficiency and to potentially reduce costs. RCD is an adaptive approach to survey data collection that uses information available prior to and during data collection to adjust the collection strategy for the remaining in-progress cases. In practice, the survey managers monitor and analyze collection progress against a predetermined set of indicators for two purposes: to identify critical data-collection milestones that require significant changes to the collection approach and to adjust collection strategies to make the most efficient use of remaining available resources. In the RCD context, numerous considerations come into play when determining which aspects of data collection to adjust and how to adjust them. Paradata sources play a key role in the planning, development and implementation of active management for RCD surveys. Since 2009, Statistics Canada has conducted several RCD surveys. This paper describes Statistics Canada’s experiences in implementing and monitoring this type of surveys.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014752
    Description:

    This paper presents a new price index method for processing electronic transaction (scanner) data. Price indices are calculated as a ratio of a turnover index and a weighted quantity index. Product weights of quantities sold are computed from the deflated prices of each month in the current publication year. New products can be timely incorporated without price imputations, so that all transactions can be processed. Product weights are monthly updated and are used to calculate direct indices with respect to a fixed base month. Price indices are free of chain drift by this construction. The results are robust under departures from the methodological choices. The method is part of the Dutch CPI since January 2016, when it was first applied to mobile phones.

    Release date: 2016-03-24
Reference (100)

Reference (100) (0 to 10 of 100 results)

  • Geographic files and documentation: 12-572-X
    Description:

    The Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) provides a systematic classification structure that categorizes all of the geographic area of Canada. The SGC is the official classification used in the Census of Population and other Statistics Canada surveys.

    The classification is organized in two volumes: Volume I, The Classification and Volume II, Reference Maps.

    Volume II contains reference maps showing boundaries, names, codes and locations of the geographic areas in the classification. The reference maps show census subdivisions, census divisions, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census metropolitan influenced zones and economic regions. Definitions for these terms are found in Volume I, The Classification. Volume I describes the classification and related standard geographic areas and place names.

    The maps in Volume II can be downloaded in PDF format from our website.

    Release date: 2016-11-16

  • Notices and consultations: 92-140-X2016001
    Description:

    The 2016 Census Program Content Test was conducted from May 2 to June 30, 2014. The Test was designed to assess the impact of any proposed content changes to the 2016 Census Program and to measure the impact of including a social insurance number (SIN) question on the data quality.

    This quantitative test used a split-panel design involving 55,000 dwellings, divided into 11 panels of 5,000 dwellings each: five panels were dedicated to the Content Test while the remaining six panels were for the SIN Test. Two models of test questionnaires were developed to meet the objectives, namely a model with all the proposed changes EXCEPT the SIN question and a model with all the proposed changes INCLUDING the SIN question. A third model of 'control' questionnaire with the 2011 content was also developed. The population living in a private dwelling in mail-out areas in one of the ten provinces was targeted for the test. Paper and electronic response channels were part of the Test as well.

    This report presents the Test objectives, the design and a summary of the analysis in order to determine potential content for the 2016 Census Program. Results from the data analysis of the Test were not the only elements used to determine the content for 2016. Other elements were also considered, such as response burden, comparison over time and users’ needs.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014706
    Description:

    Over the last decade, Statistics Canada’s Producer Prices Division has expanded its service producer price indexes program and continued to improve its goods and construction producer price indexes program. While the majority of price indexes are based on traditional survey methods, efforts were made to increase the use of administrative data and alternative data sources in order to reduce burden on our respondents. This paper focuses mainly on producer price programs, but also provides information on the growing importance of alternative data sources at Statistics Canada. In addition, it presents the operational challenges and risks that statistical offices could face when relying more and more on third-party outputs. Finally, it presents the tools being developed to integrate alternative data while collecting metadata.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014707
    Description:

    The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a monthly household survey of about 56,000 households that provides information on the Canadian labour market. Audit Trail is a Blaise programming option, for surveys like LFS with Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI), which creates files containing every keystroke and edit and timestamp of every data collection attempt on all households. Combining such a large survey with such a complete source of paradata opens the door to in-depth data quality analysis but also quickly leads to Big Data challenges. How can meaningful information be extracted from this large set of keystrokes and timestamps? How can it help assess the quality of LFS data collection? The presentation will describe some of the challenges that were encountered, solutions that were used to address them, and results of the analysis on data quality.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014751
    Description:

    Practically all major retailers use scanners to record the information on their transactions with clients (consumers). These data normally include the product code, a brief description, the price and the quantity sold. This is an extremely relevant data source for statistical programs such as Statistics Canada’s Consumer Price Index (CPI), one of Canada’s most important economic indicators. Using scanner data could improve the quality of the CPI by increasing the number of prices used in calculations, expanding geographic coverage and including the quantities sold, among other things, while lowering data collection costs. However, using these data presents many challenges. An examination of scanner data from a first retailer revealed a high rate of change in product identification codes over a one-year period. The effects of these changes pose challenges from a product classification and estimate quality perspective. This article focuses on the issues associated with acquiring, classifying and examining these data to assess their quality for use in the CPI.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-654-X2016003
    Description:

    This paper describes the process that led to the creation of the new Disability Screening Questions (DSQ), jointly developped by Statistics Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada. The DSQ form a new module which can be put on general population surveys to allow comparisons of persons with and without a disability. The paper explains why there are two versions of the DSQ—a long and a short one—, the difference between the two, and how each version can be used.

    Release date: 2016-02-29

  • Notices and consultations: 75-513-X2014001
    Description:

    Starting with the 2012 reference year, annual individual and family income data is produced by the Canadian Income Survey (CIS). The CIS is a cross-sectional survey developed to provide information on the income and income sources of Canadians, along with their individual and household characteristics. The CIS reports on many of the same statistics as the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), which last reported on income for the 2011 reference year. This note describes the CIS methodology, as well as the main differences in survey objectives, methodology and questionnaires between CIS and SLID.

    Release date: 2014-12-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201300014258
    Description:

    The National Fuel Consumption Survey (FCS) was created in 2013 and is a quarterly survey that is designed to analyze distance driven and fuel consumption for passenger cars and other vehicles weighing less than 4,500 kilograms. The sampling frame consists of vehicles extracted from the vehicle registration files, which are maintained by provincial ministries. For collection, FCS uses car chips for a part of the sampled units to collect information about the trips and the fuel consumed. There are numerous advantages to using this new technology, for example, reduction in response burden, collection costs and effects on data quality. For the quarters in 2013, the sampled units were surveyed 95% via paper questionnaires and 5% with car chips, and in Q1 2014, 40% of sampled units were surveyed with car chips. This study outlines the methodology of the survey process, examines the advantages and challenges in processing and imputation for the two collection modes, presents some initial results and concludes with a summary of the lessons learned.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201300014260
    Description:

    The Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH) produces monthly estimates and determines the month-to-month changes for variables such as employment, earnings and hours at detailed industrial levels for Canada, the provinces and territories. In order to improve the efficiency of collection activities for this survey, an electronic questionnaire (EQ) was introduced in the fall of 2012. Given the timeframe allowed for this transition as well as the production calendar of the survey, a conversion strategy was developed for the integration of this new mode. The goal of the strategy was to ensure a good adaptation of the collection environment and also to allow the implementation of a plan of analysis that would evaluate the impact of this change on the results of the survey. This paper will give an overview of the conversion strategy, the different adjustments that were made during the transition period and the results of various evaluations that were conducted. For example, the impact of the integration of the EQ on the collection process, the response rate and the follow-up rate will be presented. In addition, the effect that this new collection mode has on the survey estimates will also be discussed. More specifically, the results of a randomized experiment that was conducted in order to determine the presence of a mode effect will be presented.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201300014278
    Description:

    In January and February 2014, Statistics Canada conducted a test aiming at measuring the effectiveness of different collection strategies using an online self-reporting survey. Sampled units were contacted using mailed introductory letters and asked to complete the online survey without any interviewer contact. The objectives of this test were to measure the take-up rates for completing an online survey, and to profile the respondents/non-respondents. Different samples and letters were tested to determine the relative effectiveness of the different approaches. The results of this project will be used to inform various social surveys that are preparing to include an internet response option in their surveys. The paper will present the general methodology of the test as well as results observed from collection and the analysis of profiles.

    Release date: 2014-10-31
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