Merchandise imports and exports

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All (65) (0 to 10 of 65 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100007
    Description:

    These tables present values of Canada's monthly imports and duties collected on imported goods. The tables include Canada's total import and duty values, and these values for dairy products, iron and steel products, aluminum products, vehicles, and for all other goods. Each table includes Canada's total imports and imports from the United States.

    Release date: 2019-10-04

  • Articles and reports: 16-001-M2019001
    Description:

    This report presents annual estimates of international exports and imports of environmental and clean technology products from 2007 to 2017 by region and country of origin and destination. The data are consistent with those presented in the Environmental and Clean Technology Products Economic Account (ECTPEA), which is developed within the framework of the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). As such, estimates are directly comparable to macroeconomic aggregates such as gross domestic product (GDP) and international trade. Several tables and a summary of findings are included.

    Release date: 2019-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018085
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first half of 2018 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available on October 9, 2018.

    Release date: 2018-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018081
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, earnings and housing market activity in British Columbia. Highlighting the contribution of real estate and residential construction to economic growth, the paper focuses on strength since 2014. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on May 2, 2018.

    Release date: 2018-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018080
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2017 and early 2018. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 6, 2018.

    Release date: 2018-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154883
    Description:

    The Broad Economic Categories (BEC) classification provides users with a new perspective on Canada’s imports and exports. A key feature of the BEC classification is an end-use aggregating structure that is consistent with the three basic classes of goods in the System of National Accounts (SNA), namely, capital goods, intermediate goods, consumption goods. This aggregating structure facilitates the analysis of external trade statistics with other economic data such as industry statistics and national economic account aggregates such as gross domestic product. Imports and exports classified by Broad Economic Categories provide insight into the role of imports and exports as inputs into production, as a source of capital and as a source of goods for final consumption. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of Canada’s external trade according to these national account classes of goods.

    Release date: 2018-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154890
    Description:

    Canada exports over $500 billion worth of merchandise trade annually. This reliance on foreign markets contributes undeniably to Canadian economic activity. However, there are a number of ways of analyzing Canada’s international trade, beyond simply measuring dollar values. One way, that often receives little attention, is to look at the degree of export diversification. Simply put, does an economy have one large customer or multiple customers, or does a country export one product or multiple products?

    Release date: 2018-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114841
    Description:

    Trade patterns with the U.S. on a regional basis highlight the integration of industries between the two countries; proximity, transport infrastructure and government policy have all contributed to these interdependencies. Indeed, for the year 2016, 11 of Canada’s top 20 trading partners were U.S. states.

    Release date: 2017-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015099
    Description:

    In the aftermath of 9/11, a new security regime was imposed on Canada–U.S. truck-borne trade, raising the question of whether the border has ‘thickened.’ Did the cost of moving goods across the border by truck rise? If so, by how much, and have these additional costs persisted through time? Building on previous work that measured the premium paid by shippers to move goods across the Canada–U.S. border by truck, from the mid- to late 2000s, this paper extends the time series back to 1994, encompassing the pre- and post-9/11 eras.

    Release date: 2015-07-24
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Analysis (65)

Analysis (65) (0 to 10 of 65 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-28-0001201800100007
    Description:

    These tables present values of Canada's monthly imports and duties collected on imported goods. The tables include Canada's total import and duty values, and these values for dairy products, iron and steel products, aluminum products, vehicles, and for all other goods. Each table includes Canada's total imports and imports from the United States.

    Release date: 2019-10-04

  • Articles and reports: 16-001-M2019001
    Description:

    This report presents annual estimates of international exports and imports of environmental and clean technology products from 2007 to 2017 by region and country of origin and destination. The data are consistent with those presented in the Environmental and Clean Technology Products Economic Account (ECTPEA), which is developed within the framework of the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). As such, estimates are directly comparable to macroeconomic aggregates such as gross domestic product (GDP) and international trade. Several tables and a summary of findings are included.

    Release date: 2019-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018085
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first half of 2018 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available on October 9, 2018.

    Release date: 2018-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018081
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, earnings and housing market activity in British Columbia. Highlighting the contribution of real estate and residential construction to economic growth, the paper focuses on strength since 2014. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on May 2, 2018.

    Release date: 2018-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018080
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2017 and early 2018. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 6, 2018.

    Release date: 2018-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154883
    Description:

    The Broad Economic Categories (BEC) classification provides users with a new perspective on Canada’s imports and exports. A key feature of the BEC classification is an end-use aggregating structure that is consistent with the three basic classes of goods in the System of National Accounts (SNA), namely, capital goods, intermediate goods, consumption goods. This aggregating structure facilitates the analysis of external trade statistics with other economic data such as industry statistics and national economic account aggregates such as gross domestic product. Imports and exports classified by Broad Economic Categories provide insight into the role of imports and exports as inputs into production, as a source of capital and as a source of goods for final consumption. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of Canada’s external trade according to these national account classes of goods.

    Release date: 2018-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154890
    Description:

    Canada exports over $500 billion worth of merchandise trade annually. This reliance on foreign markets contributes undeniably to Canadian economic activity. However, there are a number of ways of analyzing Canada’s international trade, beyond simply measuring dollar values. One way, that often receives little attention, is to look at the degree of export diversification. Simply put, does an economy have one large customer or multiple customers, or does a country export one product or multiple products?

    Release date: 2018-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114841
    Description:

    Trade patterns with the U.S. on a regional basis highlight the integration of industries between the two countries; proximity, transport infrastructure and government policy have all contributed to these interdependencies. Indeed, for the year 2016, 11 of Canada’s top 20 trading partners were U.S. states.

    Release date: 2017-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015099
    Description:

    In the aftermath of 9/11, a new security regime was imposed on Canada–U.S. truck-borne trade, raising the question of whether the border has ‘thickened.’ Did the cost of moving goods across the border by truck rise? If so, by how much, and have these additional costs persisted through time? Building on previous work that measured the premium paid by shippers to move goods across the Canada–U.S. border by truck, from the mid- to late 2000s, this paper extends the time series back to 1994, encompassing the pre- and post-9/11 eras.

    Release date: 2015-07-24
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