Health measures

Key indicators

Changing any selection will automatically update the page content.

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (29)

All (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

Data (15)

Data (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201200111710
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is a Health fact sheet about the muscular strength of Canadians, as measured by grip strength. Findings are presented by age and sex. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2012-10-29

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201000211271
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is a Health fact sheet about functional health amoung Canadians. The Canadian Community Health survey assessed functional health through the use of a health utility index. The Health Utility Index Mark 3 (HUI3) developed at McMaster University was used to assess functional health. It measures a person's overall functional health using eight attributes: vision, hearing, speech, mobility, dexterity, feelings, cognition and pain.

    Release date: 2010-06-15

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201000111088
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data on lung function will allow researchers to develop normal values for age, gender and racial groups in Canada that can be used in research and assist in medical diagnoses.

    Release date: 2010-01-13

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201000111089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    While Canadian males are stronger than females on average for all ages, females tend to be more flexible and retain their flexibility much later in life.

    Release date: 2010-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110408
    Description:

    Despite advances that have improved the health of the United States population, disparities in health remain among various racial/ethnic and socio-economic groups. Common data sources for assessing the health of a population of interest include large-scale surveys that often pose questions requiring a self-report, such as, "Has a doctor or other health professional ever told you that you have health condition of interest?" Answers to such questions might not always reflect the true prevalences of health conditions (for example, if a respondent does not have access to a doctor or other health professional). Similarly, self-reported data on quantities such as height and weight might be subject to reporting errors. Such "measurement error" in health data could affect inferences about measures of health and health disparities. In this work, we fit measurement-error models to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which asks self-report questions during an interview component and also obtains physical measurements during an examination component. We then develop methods for using the fitted models to improve on analyses of self-reported data from another survey that does not include an examination component. The methods, which involve multiply imputing examination-based data values for the survey that has only self-reported data, are applied to the National Health Interview Survey in examples involving diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Preliminary results suggest that the adjustments for measurement error can result in non-negligible changes in estimates of measures of health.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110412
    Description:

    The Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) represents Statistics Canada's first health survey employing a comprehensive battery of direct physical measurements of health. The CHMS will be collecting directly measured health data on a representative sample of 5000 Canadians aged 6 to 79 in 2007 to 2009. After a comprehensive in-home health interview, respondents report to a mobile examination centre where direct health measures are performed. Measures include fitness tests, anthropometry, objective physical activity monitoring, spirometry, blood pressure measurements, oral health measures and blood and urine sampling. Blood and urine are analyzed for measures of chronic disease, infectious disease, nutritional indicators and environmental biomarkers. This survey has many unique and peculiar challenges rarely experienced by most Statistics Canada surveys; some of these challenges are described in this paper. The data collected through the CHMS is unique and represents a valuable health surveillance and research resource for Canada.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110414
    Description:

    In Finland the first national health examination surveys were carried out in the 1960s. Comprehensive surveys of nationally representative population samples have been carried out in 1978 to 1980 (The Mini-Finland Health Survey) and in 2000 to 2001 (Health 2000). Surveys of cardiovascular risk factors, so called FinRisk surveys, have assessed their trends every five years. The health examination surveys are an important tool of health monitoring, and, linked with registers also a rich source of data for epidemiological research. The paper also gives examples on reports published from several of these studies.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110426
    Description:

    This paper describes the sample design used to satisfy the objectives and logistics of the Canadian Health Measures Survey. Among the challenges in developing the design were the need to select respondents close to clinics, the difficulty of achieving the desired sample size for young people, and subsampling for measures associated with exposure to environmental contaminants. The sample design contains solutions to those challenges: the establishment of collection sites, the use of more than one sample frame, and a respondent selection strategy.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110430
    Description:

    In this presentation, Mr. Murray discusses the notion of functional health status and proposes an agenda for developing comparable methods of measuring this concept.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110439
    Description:

    On behalf of Statistics Canada, I would like to welcome you all, friends and colleagues, to Symposium 2006. This the 23rd International Symposium organized by Statistics Canada on survey methodology.

    Release date: 2008-03-17
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-629-X2016001
    Description:

    Introductory video for the survey provided to respondents at the household and posted on the Canadian Health Measures Survey Respondent relations (Statcan) website.

    Release date: 2016-01-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5071
    Description: The Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) aims to collect important health information through a household interview and direct physical measures at a mobile examination centre (MEC), sometimes referred to as a mobile clinic.
Date modified: