Entry, exit, mergers and growth

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All (81) (50 to 60 of 81 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20030017710
    Description:

    This paper presents a probabilistic model which estimates the number of enterprises in different strata and applies logistic regression to estimate the probability of companies' activity statuses based on a survey on existence.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040107420
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents measures of the extent of renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker. Renewal occurs when old plants are supplanted by new plants or when some plants decline and others grow. In both cases, resources used in production are being shifted from less productive to more productive plants.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2004008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper measures the extent of economic renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, 1961 to 1999, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004023
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper measures the degree of job renewal in Canadian manufacturing as a whole and across provinces. This study uses a longitudinal microdata set that covers the population of manufacturing plants in Canada from 1973 to 1996.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper proposes a method for measuring the impact of plant turnover on productivity growth and outlines how this contribution has changed in Canada as a result of substantial trade liberalization in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004220
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses the 1993 to 2000 Exporter Registry of Statistics Canada to study the factors determining the success or exit of Canadian establishments on foreign markets. The survival analysis model is adopted to study the survival and hazard rates of exporting establishments, with the Cox proportional hazards regression used for the econometric analysis.

    Release date: 2004-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004205
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper considers the implications of changing trade barriers on the survival of Canadian manufacturing firms. A segmented market Cournot model was developed to describe the effects of trade liberalization for heterogeneous firms operating in diverse industries. The predictions of this model are tested empirically using firm-level data for both public and private corporations and tariff rates for both Canada and the United States. Our findings suggest that Canadian tariff reductions decreased the probability of the survival of Canadian firms while declines in American tariffs increased the probability. Combining these two effects, firms in two-thirds of Canadian manufacturing industries saw their probability of survival increase as a result of the tariff reductions mandated by the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement. However, the sensitivity of individual firms to tariff changes was mitigated by the characteristics of those firms. In particular, productivity and leverage played substantial roles in determining a firm's vulnerability to failure as a result of trade liberalization.

    Release date: 2004-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003202
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors underlying firm failure, and compares the failure mechanisms for young firms against those of older organizations. This paper suggests that there are systematic differences between the determinants of firm failure for firms that fail early in life and those that fail after having successfully negotiated the early liabilities of newness and adolescence. Data from 339 Canadian corporate bankruptcies confirm that younger firms fail because of inadequacies in managerial knowledge and financial management abilities. On the other hand, older firms are more likely to fail because of an inability to adapt to environmental change.

    Release date: 2003-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003193
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the size of the turnover in plants that have entered and exited the Canadian manufacturing sector during the three periods: 1973-1979, 1979-1988 and 1988-1997. It also examines the contribution of plant turnover to labour productivity growth in the manufacturing sector over the three periods. Plant turnover makes a significant contribution to productivity growth as more productive entrants replace exiting plants that are less productive. A disproportionately large fraction of the contribution of plant turnover to productivity growth is due to multi-plant or foreign-controlled firms closing down and opening up new plants. The plants opened up by multi-plant or foreign-controlled firms are typically much more productive than those opened by single-plant or domestic-controlled.

    Release date: 2003-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002189
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring size of entry. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the information we have on the amount of entry in Canada.

    The paper also fulfils another purpose. Some studies have focused on cross-country comparisons (Geroski and Schwalbach 1991; OECD 2001). Interpretation of the results of these studies is difficult unless methodological issues regarding how entry is measured are addressed. Without an understanding of the extent to which different databases produce different results, international comparisons are difficult to evaluate. Cross-country comparisons that are derived from extremely different data sources may be misleading because of the lack of comparability.

    Since there is more than one reliable database that can be used to estimate entry in Canada, this paper asks how measured entry rates vary across different Canadian databases. By examining the difference in entry rates produced by these databases, we provide an estimate of the range or confidence interval that should be used in evaluating whether there are real differences in measured entry rates across countries. We also offer guidance as to the questions that should be asked about the databases used by researchers who conduct international studies. Finally, we make suggestions as to areas of comparison on which international studies should focus.

    Release date: 2002-05-29
Data (16)

Data (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Table: 33-10-0164-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    This table contains 2736 series, with data starting from 2001 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (16 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of incumbents; Number of exits; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (19 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...) Firm size (9 items: Private sector; From 0 to less than 100 employees; From 0 to less than 50 employees; Less than 5 employees; ...).

    Release date: 2019-06-10

  • Table: 33-10-0165-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0013)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Quarterly
    Description:

    This table contains 170 series, with data for years 2000 - 2017 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (10 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of exits; Entry rate; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (17 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...).

    Release date: 2019-04-03

  • Table: 33-10-0176-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific events occurred in the main geographical market, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Specific events include entry of new competitor(s), exit of competitor(s), increase in competitive behaviour from existing competitors, and decrease in competitive behaviour from existing competitors.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Table: 33-10-0087-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0007)
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Counts of Entrants, Incumbents, and Exits by North American Industry Classification System, for each province and territory from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program.
    Release date: 2018-11-21

  • Table: 33-10-0088-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0008)
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Entrants, Incumbents, and Exits by firm size, for each province and territory from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program.
    Release date: 2018-11-21

  • Table: 33-10-0136-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Active enterprises with one or more employees, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0137-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0002)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Employer enterprise births, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0138-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0003)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Employer enterprise deaths, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0139-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0004)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Number of employer enterprises newly born having survived one year, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0140-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0005)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Number of employer enterprises newly born having survived two years, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07
Analysis (63)

Analysis (63) (50 to 60 of 63 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990025344
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A Statistics Canada study uses business demographics to learn about innovation and technological change and uncovers interesting patterns. Contrary to expectations, the author uncovered considerable volatility (start-ups and closures) in the service sector. The volatility rate for this sector was 31% compared with 23% for the manufacturing sector. Firms that do not innovate frequently are replaced by new ones that have new or improved products to offer or by those that employ more efficient methods of production and delivery.

    Release date: 2000-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990024720
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study has two goals. The first is to determine what share of the total chain-store market big-box stores have carved out for themselves in recent years - in terms of numbers and locations, sales and floor space. This information is useful for those concerned with changing market structures, as well as for the general public. Secondly, the "effectiveness" of big-box stores is then compared with that of other stores.

    Release date: 1999-10-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-517-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    New firms are seen to play a key role in the innovation process, especially in certain key sectors of the economy. This study therefore examines the differences in the profiles of successful new firms in science-based industries and other industries. The firms that are examined are entrants who survey into their early teen years. The study examines numerous factors that are seen to influence the success of new businesses. These include the competitive environment, business strategies and the financial structure of the businesses.

    Successful new firms in science-based industries are found to differ in a number of dimensions from new firms in other industries. They are more likely to be exporters. They face greater technological change and intense competition with regards to the rate at which new products are being introduced. They tend to put more emphasis on quality, the frequent introduction of new products and the customization of products. They make greater use of information technology. They place more stress on new technology development, research and development facilities and the use of intellectual property. They are much more likely to innovate and they place more importance on recruiting skilled labour and on training. Finally, they are more likely to use non-traditional financial measures to evaluate performance and they are less likely to rely on secured credit for financing both their research and development activity and their machinery and equipment that are firms in other sectors.

    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999121
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Entry and exit are important phenomena. This paper reviews the evidence on the size of this process and its contribution to productivity and innovation. It then develops a detailed portrait of the characteristics of new firms that survive and those that fail. In doing so, it examines the type of competencies that are developed in both groups of firms. It asks which competencies are developed by new firms. In particular, it focuses on the innovative capabilities of new firms. It shows that small firms in general and entrants in particular are heterogeneous when it comes to their innovative activity. The types of innovative activity in which they are engaged vary widely. Some focus on research and development (R&D) and new products. Others focus on new technologies. Still others stress the development of human capital. In addition, this paper examines the competitive environment that new firms face and the connection between growth and innovation. It also examines the complementary skills that are employed by innovators. Finally, the paper focuses on the causes of failure in the firm population. It extends earlier work that finds that failing firms differ from surviving firms in terms of basic competencies-management, financial management and marketing capabilities.

    Release date: 1999-02-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-525-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Bankruptcy rates have been increasing in Canada. Almost half of the firms in Canada that go bankrupt do so primarily because of their own deficiencies rather than externally generated problems. They do not develop the basic internal strengths to survive. Overall weakness in management, combined with a lack of market for their product, cause these firms to fail.

    This study suggests that the underlying factor contributing to financial difficulties is management failure rather than external factors associated with imperfect capital markets. Many bankrupt firms face problems in attaining financing in capital markets; but, it is the internal lack of managerial expertise in many of these firms that prevents exploration of different financing options.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013493
    Description:

    The objective of this brief paper is to describe recent trends in the merger and acquisition (M&A) activity in the forest products industry in Canada. The two driving forces most often cited in M&A activity are rising capital costs and full product line servicing. Both of these factors have been at play at various times in the history of forest products industry. However, over the last few years there has been a growing national and global perception that current wood supplies would not be able to satisfy future demand. While the trend away from diversification of earlier decades towards the more recent consolidation of "core" product lines may be the stated reason for the many cases of restructuring, it is felt that the real driving force is the increasing uncertainty associated with raw material supplies. This in turn suggests that possible future "inter-regional" M&A activity may help to secure wood fibre supplies - directly or indirectly - and mitigate increases.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997108
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Trade exerts generally favourable effects on the performance of domestic manufacturing industries in the dimensions of allocative and productive efficiency. This paper reviews theory and recent evidence on these linkages and also explore a third effect-on the turbulence of competitive conditions and the turnover of business units. Calculations using primary census records for Canada over 1973-1992 indicate, with time and industry effect, controlled, market-share turnover, entry, exit, and mergers all increase with trade exposure. The effect is tied to market structures of differentiated products but broad international disturbances (North American Free Trade Area) also have significant effects. The normative significant of turbulence is mixed but has important positive components.

    Release date: 1997-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994061
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates structural change at the national and the regional level in five broadly defined sectors of the Canadian economy -- the natural-resource-based, the labour-intensive, the scale-based, the product-differentiated, and the science-based sectors. Three aspects of change are examined. First, changes in the importance of each sector over the last twenty years are traced. Second, the amount of internal change within each sector -- changes in the importance of individual industries in each sector and the nature of job turnover within industries are examined. Finally, the extent to which wage differentials have widened over time is examined.

    Release date: 1996-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995078
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the dynamics of job reallocation in the manufacturing sector of Canada. It does so by examining the pattern and magnitude of job gain, job loss, and total job turnover due to growth and decline of some firms, and entry and exit of other firms. It also investigates how the effect of cyclical as opposed to structural influences on job turnover have changed over time. Finally, the paper investigates whether the pattern and magnitude of job turnover differ across industries and across regions, and whether the differences are either caused by differences in cyclical sensitivity of job creation and job destruction or in the extent to which restructuring is taking place.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the maturation process of firms that enter an industry by constructing new plant and investigates the extent to which improvements in the performance of an entry cohort are the result of a selection process that culls out the most inefficient entrants or of a learning process that allows survivors to improve their performance relative to incumbent firms. Both selection and evolutionary learning are related to post-entry performance. Despite the difference in the effect of selection and learning on the amount of post-entry growth, selection per se is a more important contributor to overall growth of a cohort.

    Release date: 1995-04-30
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5056
    Description: Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division is engaged in a joint project with the National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) to investigate the characteristics of growth firms.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5157
    Description: The objective of the Entrepreneurship Indicators Database is to provide comprehensive business demography statistics and performance indicators for enterprises in Canada.
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