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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114011
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2011 National Household Survey to examine the migration patterns of ‘infrastructure tradespersons’ over the period 2006 to 2011. In this study, infrastructure tradespersons are defined as Canadian residents aged 25 to 44 with a certification in trades and whose major field of study was in construction trades, mechanics and repair, precision production, or heavy equipment machinery/crane operation.

    Release date: 2014-06-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-595-M2009071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This document outlines the definitions and the typology now used by Statistics Canada's Centre for Education Statistics to identify, classify and delineate the universities, colleges and other providers of postsecondary and adult education in Canada for which basic enrolments, graduates, professors and finance statistics are produced.

    These new rigorous definitions were needed to capture the growing complexity of postsecondary education in Canada. They differentiate the various types of postsecondary institutions, address the blurring distinction between colleges and universities and handle the various forms of possible relationships between institutions.

    The document brings closure to the extensive consultation that took place between January 2003 and the spring of 2007 as it summarizes the changes made following the 2004 paper entitled "A New Understanding of Post-secondary Education in Canada: A Discussion Paper".

    Such an extensive consultation was deemed necessary to ensure that the typology is useful to the whole sector and that it allows comparisons between provinces and territories despite the significant differences of their respective postsecondary education systems.

    Release date: 2009-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006276
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on a sample drawn from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID: 1993 to 1998 and 1996 to 2001), the study finds that young (17 to 34 years old) and single workers were more likely than older (35 to 59 years old) and married and divorced workers to participate in adult schooling and to obtain a post-secondary certificate. Workers with less than a high school education who might have the greatest need to increase their human capital investment were less likely to participate in adult education than workers with high school or more education.

    The study shows that male workers who obtained a post-secondary certificate while staying with the same employer generally registered higher wage and earnings gains than their counterparts who did not go back to school, regardless of age and initial level of education. On the other hand, men who obtained a certificate and switched jobs generally realized no significant return to their additional education, with the exception of young men (17 to 34 years old) who would receive significant returns to a certificate, whether they switched employer or stayed with the same employer.

    Obtaining a certificate generated significant wage and earnings returns for older women (aged 35 to 59) who stayed with the same employer, and significant wage returns for young women who switched employers.

    Release date: 2006-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005035
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Potential shortages in specific trades and specific areas of the country are forecast for the coming years in Canada. One particular aspect being examined is the perceived low completion rates of Registered Apprentices (RA). This pilot study follows a longitudinal cohort of registered apprentices, who first started their programs in 1992, over a period of 11 years. The report discusses the quality of, and gaps in, current administrative data available to measure completion rates. Finally, it presents methodological work to highlight pros and cons of different approaches to calculating a completion rate.

    Release date: 2005-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report builds on previous research examining the role of family income in postsecondary education. The paper attempts to address three broad questions using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). First, has the postsecondary education participation pattern changed in the recent past either for college and university participation, or for youth of various backgrounds? Second, how are the socio-economic factors related to postsecondary participation? Does the impact of socio-economic factors differ for college and university participation? Thirdly, for those who did pursue postsecondary education, which factors are more important in the choice of institution - university versus college?

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-133-X
    Description:

    This report describes changes planned for the 2006 Census education questions. Education questions are a part of the Form 2B (the long form) of the census. This form is completed by 20% of all households. These changes were tested in the May 2004 Census test of over 300,000 households. The changes aim to address data limitations in the 2001 Census questions and to enhance their relevance to education studies by allowing a better reflection of the range of educational pathways taken by Canadians. The report includes an explanation of the reasons for modifying the 2006 Census education content, a detailed look at each of the changes, and a discussion on historical consistency.

    Release date: 2005-08-31

  • 81C0018
    Description:

    Survey of Financial Statistics of School Boards

    This annual survey collects financial statistics from school boards across Canada.

    Survey of Financial Statistics of Community Colleges and Vocational Schools

    This annual survey collects data on revenue and expenditures from community colleges and vocational schools in Canada.

    Survey of Financial Statistics of Private Elementary and Secondary Schools

    This annual survey collects financial data from private elementary and secondary schools in Canada.

    Release date: 2005-04-01

  • Table: 81-229-X
    Description:

    This publication is an annual review of statistics on Canadian education. It summarizes information on institutions, enrolment, graduates, teachers and finance for all levels of education and provides an analysis of the data. Ten-year time series are shown for most variables at the Canada level and five-year time series at the provincial level. The publication also provides demographic data from the census of Canada and educational attainment, labour force participation rates and unemployment rates of the adult population from the Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0031X
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration
    Description:

    Data on Aboriginal status contained in this report are based on self-reported (Census) and/or observational (crime) data. They provide information on the nature and extent of Aboriginal involvement in urban, rural and reserve crime as well as the socio-demographic profile of the population of Saskatchewan.

    Based on the 1996 Census data, the Aboriginal population in Saskatchewan tend to be younger, have lower educational levels, higher unemployment rates, and substantially lower incomes than the non-Aboriginal population. Crime rates on reserves were two times higher than rates in rural or urban areas of the province. For violent offences, the rate was almost five times higher on-reserve than in urban or rural areas.

    In all three areas (reserves, urban and rural areas), a larger proportion of adults than youth was accused of a violent offence or an "other" Criminal Code offence. In contrast, youth were more often accused of a property offence than any other offence type. In urban areas, there is an over-representation of Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice system. In 1997, more than one-half (52%) of those accused in Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon were Aboriginal compared to their 9% proportion in the population of these cities.

    A substantial difference in the male-female ratio of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal accused was found. Although the majority of all those accused were male, there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal female than non-Aboriginal female accused. Aboriginal accused tended to be younger than non-Aboriginal accused. Almost one-third (31%) of Aboriginal accused were aged 12 to 17 years of age compared to 23% of non-Aboriginal accused.

    In the two cities where victim data were available (Regina and Prince Albert), there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal victims of violent crime compared to their proportion in the overall population of these cities. In 1997, 42% of victims in Prince Albert and Regina were Aboriginal, compared to their 10% proportion in the population of these cities.

    Release date: 2000-01-31

  • Table: 95F0227X1996003
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-07-14
Data (10)

Data (10) ((10 results))

  • Table: 81-229-X
    Description:

    This publication is an annual review of statistics on Canadian education. It summarizes information on institutions, enrolment, graduates, teachers and finance for all levels of education and provides an analysis of the data. Ten-year time series are shown for most variables at the Canada level and five-year time series at the provincial level. The publication also provides demographic data from the census of Canada and educational attainment, labour force participation rates and unemployment rates of the adult population from the Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Table: 95F0227X1996003
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0227X1996004
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0227X1996005
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0228X1996001
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0228X1996002
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0228X1996003
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0228X1996004
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0228X1996005
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Public use microdata: 95M0007X
    Description:

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to unaggregated data. This makes the public use microdata files (PUMFs) powerful research tools. Each file contains anonymous individual responses on a large number of variables. The PUMF user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. Tabulations not included in other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed by using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people. All subject-matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. However, to ensure the anonymity of the respondents, geographic identifiers have been restricted to the provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas. Microdata files have traditionally been disseminated on magnetic tape, which required access to a mainframe computer. For the first time, the 1991 PUMFs will also be available on CD-ROM for microcomputer applications. This file contains data based on a 3% of the population enumerated in the 1991 Census. It provides information on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the Canadian population. The Individual File allows users to return to the base unit of the census, enabling them to group and manipulate the data to suit their own data and research requirements.

    This product provides two basic tools to assist users in accessing and using the 1991 Census Public Use Microdata File - Individuals CD-ROM.

    Release date: 1995-04-11
Analysis (5)

Analysis (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114011
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2011 National Household Survey to examine the migration patterns of ‘infrastructure tradespersons’ over the period 2006 to 2011. In this study, infrastructure tradespersons are defined as Canadian residents aged 25 to 44 with a certification in trades and whose major field of study was in construction trades, mechanics and repair, precision production, or heavy equipment machinery/crane operation.

    Release date: 2014-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006276
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on a sample drawn from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID: 1993 to 1998 and 1996 to 2001), the study finds that young (17 to 34 years old) and single workers were more likely than older (35 to 59 years old) and married and divorced workers to participate in adult schooling and to obtain a post-secondary certificate. Workers with less than a high school education who might have the greatest need to increase their human capital investment were less likely to participate in adult education than workers with high school or more education.

    The study shows that male workers who obtained a post-secondary certificate while staying with the same employer generally registered higher wage and earnings gains than their counterparts who did not go back to school, regardless of age and initial level of education. On the other hand, men who obtained a certificate and switched jobs generally realized no significant return to their additional education, with the exception of young men (17 to 34 years old) who would receive significant returns to a certificate, whether they switched employer or stayed with the same employer.

    Obtaining a certificate generated significant wage and earnings returns for older women (aged 35 to 59) who stayed with the same employer, and significant wage returns for young women who switched employers.

    Release date: 2006-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005035
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Potential shortages in specific trades and specific areas of the country are forecast for the coming years in Canada. One particular aspect being examined is the perceived low completion rates of Registered Apprentices (RA). This pilot study follows a longitudinal cohort of registered apprentices, who first started their programs in 1992, over a period of 11 years. The report discusses the quality of, and gaps in, current administrative data available to measure completion rates. Finally, it presents methodological work to highlight pros and cons of different approaches to calculating a completion rate.

    Release date: 2005-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report builds on previous research examining the role of family income in postsecondary education. The paper attempts to address three broad questions using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). First, has the postsecondary education participation pattern changed in the recent past either for college and university participation, or for youth of various backgrounds? Second, how are the socio-economic factors related to postsecondary participation? Does the impact of socio-economic factors differ for college and university participation? Thirdly, for those who did pursue postsecondary education, which factors are more important in the choice of institution - university versus college?

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0031X
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration
    Description:

    Data on Aboriginal status contained in this report are based on self-reported (Census) and/or observational (crime) data. They provide information on the nature and extent of Aboriginal involvement in urban, rural and reserve crime as well as the socio-demographic profile of the population of Saskatchewan.

    Based on the 1996 Census data, the Aboriginal population in Saskatchewan tend to be younger, have lower educational levels, higher unemployment rates, and substantially lower incomes than the non-Aboriginal population. Crime rates on reserves were two times higher than rates in rural or urban areas of the province. For violent offences, the rate was almost five times higher on-reserve than in urban or rural areas.

    In all three areas (reserves, urban and rural areas), a larger proportion of adults than youth was accused of a violent offence or an "other" Criminal Code offence. In contrast, youth were more often accused of a property offence than any other offence type. In urban areas, there is an over-representation of Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice system. In 1997, more than one-half (52%) of those accused in Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon were Aboriginal compared to their 9% proportion in the population of these cities.

    A substantial difference in the male-female ratio of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal accused was found. Although the majority of all those accused were male, there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal female than non-Aboriginal female accused. Aboriginal accused tended to be younger than non-Aboriginal accused. Almost one-third (31%) of Aboriginal accused were aged 12 to 17 years of age compared to 23% of non-Aboriginal accused.

    In the two cities where victim data were available (Regina and Prince Albert), there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal victims of violent crime compared to their proportion in the overall population of these cities. In 1997, 42% of victims in Prince Albert and Regina were Aboriginal, compared to their 10% proportion in the population of these cities.

    Release date: 2000-01-31
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-595-M2009071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This document outlines the definitions and the typology now used by Statistics Canada's Centre for Education Statistics to identify, classify and delineate the universities, colleges and other providers of postsecondary and adult education in Canada for which basic enrolments, graduates, professors and finance statistics are produced.

    These new rigorous definitions were needed to capture the growing complexity of postsecondary education in Canada. They differentiate the various types of postsecondary institutions, address the blurring distinction between colleges and universities and handle the various forms of possible relationships between institutions.

    The document brings closure to the extensive consultation that took place between January 2003 and the spring of 2007 as it summarizes the changes made following the 2004 paper entitled "A New Understanding of Post-secondary Education in Canada: A Discussion Paper".

    Such an extensive consultation was deemed necessary to ensure that the typology is useful to the whole sector and that it allows comparisons between provinces and territories despite the significant differences of their respective postsecondary education systems.

    Release date: 2009-01-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-133-X
    Description:

    This report describes changes planned for the 2006 Census education questions. Education questions are a part of the Form 2B (the long form) of the census. This form is completed by 20% of all households. These changes were tested in the May 2004 Census test of over 300,000 households. The changes aim to address data limitations in the 2001 Census questions and to enhance their relevance to education studies by allowing a better reflection of the range of educational pathways taken by Canadians. The report includes an explanation of the reasons for modifying the 2006 Census education content, a detailed look at each of the changes, and a discussion on historical consistency.

    Release date: 2005-08-31
Date modified: