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All (30) (0 to 10 of 30 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-222-X
    Description:

    Labour Statistics at a Glance features short analytical articles on specific topics of interest related to Canada's labour market. The studies examine recent or historical trends using data produced by the Labour Statistics Division, i.e., the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment Payrolls and Hours, the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey and the Employment Insurance Statistics Program.

    Release date: 2019-05-28

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019034
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labor Force Survey, this infographic highlights aspects of temporary employment in Canada in 2018, such as the share that work in term or contract, casual or seasonal jobs, as well differences by province and industry. Selected comparisons with 1998 are also included.

    Release date: 2019-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018402
    Description:

    Temporary foreign worker programs have become an increasingly important component of international migration to Western developed countries. However, there is little knowledge on how long foreign workers stay in the host country and what determinants are associated with their migratory trajectories. Using a national longitudinal administrative dataset of temporary foreign workers (TFWs) in Canada, this study examines their length and type of stay in Canada. It further examines the likelihood of staying given individual demographic characteristics, source-country attributes, host-country institutional factors and local community conditions.

    Release date: 2018-01-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017396
    Description:

    Temporary foreign workers (TFWs) are an important source of labour supply in Canada. Their transition to permanent residence may have important economic consequences, particularly in their employment and earnings trajectories. The effect of the status change may vary across different streams of TFWs who enter Canada under different terms and conditions. Hence, whether the labour market outcomes of TFWs change substantially or not after they acquire permanent residence is an empirical question. Using a unique administrative dataset, this study investigates the employment and earnings trajectories of temporary foreign workers (TFWs) during the years surrounding their acquisition of permanent residence in Canada.

    Release date: 2017-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017389
    Description:

    The number of temporary foreign workers in Canada increased considerably from the early 1990s. Temporary foreign workers over this period also became an increasingly important source of permanent residents admitted to Canada. Using the Temporary Residents file and the Immigrant Landing File, this article documents the changes in the levels and types of new temporary foreign workers who arrived in Canada from 1990 to 2014. It further examines the patterns of transition from temporary foreign workers to permanent residents, and the immigration classes through which temporary foreign workers obtained permanent residence.

    Release date: 2017-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016060
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article presents annual estimates of hiring rates and layoff rates for Canada’s 69 economic regions (ERs) for the 2003-to-2013 period. It addresses several questions: (1) To what extent do hiring rates and layoff rates differ across Canada’s ERs? (2) What is the profile of ERs that display relatively low or relatively high layoff rates? (3) To what extent did the 2008/2009 recession affect hiring rates and layoff rates in various ERs? The study uses data from the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD) to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to employees who were aged 18 to 64. Employees are defined as individuals with wages and salaries but no self-employment income in a given year. Incorporated self-employed individuals are excluded. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500114151
    Description:

    One of the main variables in the Dutch Labour Force Survey is the variable measuring whether a respondent has a permanent or a temporary job. The aim of our study is to determine the measurement error in this variable by matching the information obtained by the longitudinal part of this survey with unique register data from the Dutch Institute for Employee Insurance. Contrary to previous approaches confronting such datasets, we take into account that also register data are not error-free and that measurement error in these data is likely to be correlated over time. More specifically, we propose the estimation of the measurement error in these two sources using an extended hidden Markov model with two observed indicators for the type of contract. Our results indicate that none of the two sources should be considered as error-free. For both indicators, we find that workers in temporary contracts are often misclassified as having a permanent contract. Particularly for the register data, we find that measurement errors are strongly autocorrelated, as, if made, they tend to repeat themselves. In contrast, when the register is correct, the probability of an error at the next time period is almost zero. Finally, we find that temporary contracts are more widespread than the Labour Force Survey suggests, while transition rates between temporary to permanent contracts are much less common than both datasets suggest.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014360
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines which factors underlie the narrowing of wage differences seen between young bachelor’s degree holders and high school graduates from the 2000-to-2002 period to the 2010-to-2012 period and the widening of differences in full-time paid employment rates between these two groups.

    Four types of factors are considered: those associated with changes in labour supply, labour demand, institutions and employer–employee contracts, and general economic conditions.

    Changes in the population of bachelor’s degree holders relative to the population of high school graduates are used to capture changes in relative labour supply.

    Release date: 2014-04-28

  • Table: 63-252-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the employment services industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2014-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011113260
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article tracks trends in temporary employment since the Labour Force Survey (LFS) began measuring it from 1997 to 2009 with particular attention to the recent economic downturn. It also examines the earnings gap between temporary and permanent positions and looks at whether that gap changed during the recent employment slowdown.

    Release date: 2010-12-20
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  • Table: 63-252-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the employment services industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2014-03-04
Analysis (29)

Analysis (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-222-X
    Description:

    Labour Statistics at a Glance features short analytical articles on specific topics of interest related to Canada's labour market. The studies examine recent or historical trends using data produced by the Labour Statistics Division, i.e., the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment Payrolls and Hours, the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey and the Employment Insurance Statistics Program.

    Release date: 2019-05-28

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019034
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labor Force Survey, this infographic highlights aspects of temporary employment in Canada in 2018, such as the share that work in term or contract, casual or seasonal jobs, as well differences by province and industry. Selected comparisons with 1998 are also included.

    Release date: 2019-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018402
    Description:

    Temporary foreign worker programs have become an increasingly important component of international migration to Western developed countries. However, there is little knowledge on how long foreign workers stay in the host country and what determinants are associated with their migratory trajectories. Using a national longitudinal administrative dataset of temporary foreign workers (TFWs) in Canada, this study examines their length and type of stay in Canada. It further examines the likelihood of staying given individual demographic characteristics, source-country attributes, host-country institutional factors and local community conditions.

    Release date: 2018-01-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017396
    Description:

    Temporary foreign workers (TFWs) are an important source of labour supply in Canada. Their transition to permanent residence may have important economic consequences, particularly in their employment and earnings trajectories. The effect of the status change may vary across different streams of TFWs who enter Canada under different terms and conditions. Hence, whether the labour market outcomes of TFWs change substantially or not after they acquire permanent residence is an empirical question. Using a unique administrative dataset, this study investigates the employment and earnings trajectories of temporary foreign workers (TFWs) during the years surrounding their acquisition of permanent residence in Canada.

    Release date: 2017-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017389
    Description:

    The number of temporary foreign workers in Canada increased considerably from the early 1990s. Temporary foreign workers over this period also became an increasingly important source of permanent residents admitted to Canada. Using the Temporary Residents file and the Immigrant Landing File, this article documents the changes in the levels and types of new temporary foreign workers who arrived in Canada from 1990 to 2014. It further examines the patterns of transition from temporary foreign workers to permanent residents, and the immigration classes through which temporary foreign workers obtained permanent residence.

    Release date: 2017-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016060
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article presents annual estimates of hiring rates and layoff rates for Canada’s 69 economic regions (ERs) for the 2003-to-2013 period. It addresses several questions: (1) To what extent do hiring rates and layoff rates differ across Canada’s ERs? (2) What is the profile of ERs that display relatively low or relatively high layoff rates? (3) To what extent did the 2008/2009 recession affect hiring rates and layoff rates in various ERs? The study uses data from the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD) to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to employees who were aged 18 to 64. Employees are defined as individuals with wages and salaries but no self-employment income in a given year. Incorporated self-employed individuals are excluded. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500114151
    Description:

    One of the main variables in the Dutch Labour Force Survey is the variable measuring whether a respondent has a permanent or a temporary job. The aim of our study is to determine the measurement error in this variable by matching the information obtained by the longitudinal part of this survey with unique register data from the Dutch Institute for Employee Insurance. Contrary to previous approaches confronting such datasets, we take into account that also register data are not error-free and that measurement error in these data is likely to be correlated over time. More specifically, we propose the estimation of the measurement error in these two sources using an extended hidden Markov model with two observed indicators for the type of contract. Our results indicate that none of the two sources should be considered as error-free. For both indicators, we find that workers in temporary contracts are often misclassified as having a permanent contract. Particularly for the register data, we find that measurement errors are strongly autocorrelated, as, if made, they tend to repeat themselves. In contrast, when the register is correct, the probability of an error at the next time period is almost zero. Finally, we find that temporary contracts are more widespread than the Labour Force Survey suggests, while transition rates between temporary to permanent contracts are much less common than both datasets suggest.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014360
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines which factors underlie the narrowing of wage differences seen between young bachelor’s degree holders and high school graduates from the 2000-to-2002 period to the 2010-to-2012 period and the widening of differences in full-time paid employment rates between these two groups.

    Four types of factors are considered: those associated with changes in labour supply, labour demand, institutions and employer–employee contracts, and general economic conditions.

    Changes in the population of bachelor’s degree holders relative to the population of high school graduates are used to capture changes in relative labour supply.

    Release date: 2014-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011113260
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article tracks trends in temporary employment since the Labour Force Survey (LFS) began measuring it from 1997 to 2009 with particular attention to the recent economic downturn. It also examines the earnings gap between temporary and permanent positions and looks at whether that gap changed during the recent employment slowdown.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211166
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the growing number of non-permanent residents who work temporarily in Canada. They are compared with permanent residents in terms of demographic characteristics, location, occupations and earnings. Census data show that while the numbers destined to skilled work has been increasing, most non-permanent residents are found in relatively unskilled occupations. Reflecting the occupations in which they work, foreign nationals working temporarily in Canada tend to be paid less than are comparable Canadian born and established immigrant workers

    Release date: 2010-06-08
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