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All (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020002
    Description:

    Administrative data sets have become increasingly popular sources of information to study mobility across generations. However, the inclusion of parent-child pairs depends on the primary purpose for which the data was collected. In the case of tax records, both parents and children must have worked and filed their taxes, and the children's labour market entry must have happened before they left the parental home. This paper documents selection in samples of parent-child pairs constructed from personal income tax records from Canada, and discusses implications for intergenerational research. It takes advantage of the fact that Statistics Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) includes both survey and administrative data to inform the nature and severity of the resulting sample selection. Results show that respondents who were successfully linked to their parents are more educated, and are more likely to have grown up in better educated, nuclear families. However, correcting for sample selection suggests that there is no bias in unadjusted estimates.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020003
    Description:

    This study investigates the suitability of Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) for research on intergenerational income mobility. The LISA combines survey data, collected biennially since 2012, and the personal income tax records of both respondents and their past and present family members. In comparison, existing work on intergenerational mobility in Canada has often used the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), a purely administrative dataset based on the universe of tax filers. The IID's size has allowed researchers to describe the experience of mobility of narrowly defined geographic units and cohorts. However, its potential to investigate the mechanisms underlying these patterns is limited, given the small set of variables it informs. As such, the LISA is a promising candidate to further our understanding of the drivers of mobility. This study reproduces the analysis from four key papers that have documented the intergenerational transmission of income in Canada using the IID. Despite having a much smaller sample size and a different approach to the establishment of parent-child links, it finds that the LISA produces results that are consistent with the existing literature. This study also explores the sensitivity of rank-rank estimates to the choice of different specification and present results that will guide the methodological choices to be made by users of the LISA intergenerational family files in combination with LISA variables from the survey data.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016059
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article examines the extent to which the lifetime income of children is correlated with the lifetime income of their fathers—a topic known as intergenerational income mobility. The analysis uses data from Statistics Canada’s Intergenerational Income Database, which links together children and their parents using tax files. The data provides information that permits the comparison of the income of children to those of parents at a similar stage of the lifecycle. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report builds on previous research examining the role of family income in postsecondary education. The paper attempts to address three broad questions using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). First, has the postsecondary education participation pattern changed in the recent past either for college and university participation, or for youth of various backgrounds? Second, how are the socio-economic factors related to postsecondary participation? Does the impact of socio-economic factors differ for college and university participation? Thirdly, for those who did pursue postsecondary education, which factors are more important in the choice of institution - university versus college?

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034790
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article compares some selected indicators of psychological and social well-being for married seniors in poor health with those for seniors in good health. It also examines whether the well-being of partners is affected by their spouse's health.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-553-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since the early 1970s. Second, the authors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on to their children. However, this has not been the case for an increasingly larger minority, a group whose children in turn may face greater than average challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government finances and generational equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 1998-11-05
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Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020002
    Description:

    Administrative data sets have become increasingly popular sources of information to study mobility across generations. However, the inclusion of parent-child pairs depends on the primary purpose for which the data was collected. In the case of tax records, both parents and children must have worked and filed their taxes, and the children's labour market entry must have happened before they left the parental home. This paper documents selection in samples of parent-child pairs constructed from personal income tax records from Canada, and discusses implications for intergenerational research. It takes advantage of the fact that Statistics Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) includes both survey and administrative data to inform the nature and severity of the resulting sample selection. Results show that respondents who were successfully linked to their parents are more educated, and are more likely to have grown up in better educated, nuclear families. However, correcting for sample selection suggests that there is no bias in unadjusted estimates.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020003
    Description:

    This study investigates the suitability of Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) for research on intergenerational income mobility. The LISA combines survey data, collected biennially since 2012, and the personal income tax records of both respondents and their past and present family members. In comparison, existing work on intergenerational mobility in Canada has often used the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), a purely administrative dataset based on the universe of tax filers. The IID's size has allowed researchers to describe the experience of mobility of narrowly defined geographic units and cohorts. However, its potential to investigate the mechanisms underlying these patterns is limited, given the small set of variables it informs. As such, the LISA is a promising candidate to further our understanding of the drivers of mobility. This study reproduces the analysis from four key papers that have documented the intergenerational transmission of income in Canada using the IID. Despite having a much smaller sample size and a different approach to the establishment of parent-child links, it finds that the LISA produces results that are consistent with the existing literature. This study also explores the sensitivity of rank-rank estimates to the choice of different specification and present results that will guide the methodological choices to be made by users of the LISA intergenerational family files in combination with LISA variables from the survey data.

    Release date: 2020-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016059
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article examines the extent to which the lifetime income of children is correlated with the lifetime income of their fathers—a topic known as intergenerational income mobility. The analysis uses data from Statistics Canada’s Intergenerational Income Database, which links together children and their parents using tax files. The data provides information that permits the comparison of the income of children to those of parents at a similar stage of the lifecycle. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report builds on previous research examining the role of family income in postsecondary education. The paper attempts to address three broad questions using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). First, has the postsecondary education participation pattern changed in the recent past either for college and university participation, or for youth of various backgrounds? Second, how are the socio-economic factors related to postsecondary participation? Does the impact of socio-economic factors differ for college and university participation? Thirdly, for those who did pursue postsecondary education, which factors are more important in the choice of institution - university versus college?

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034790
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article compares some selected indicators of psychological and social well-being for married seniors in poor health with those for seniors in good health. It also examines whether the well-being of partners is affected by their spouse's health.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-553-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since the early 1970s. Second, the authors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on to their children. However, this has not been the case for an increasingly larger minority, a group whose children in turn may face greater than average challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government finances and generational equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 1998-11-05
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