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All (44) (0 to 10 of 44 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019004
    Description: This paper uses Canadian business microdata for 1999 to 2013 to study the characteristics of private-sector medium-sized firms that transition to the large or small size classes. A firm’s size class is defined over a three-year window to ensure that it represents the firm’s long-term state rather than a transient state for a given year. The paper examines what distinguishes medium-sized firms that become large from those that revert to being small.
    Release date: 2019-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018401
    Description:

    It is well established that, in most Western countries, rates of small-business ownership tend to be higher among immigrants than among the native-born. In Canada, the overall shares of taxfilers who owned a private incorporated business in 2010 were similar for immigrants (4.6%) and the Canadian-born (4.8%). However, the rate of business ownership was substantially higher (5.8%) among immigrants who had been in Canada for 10 to 30 years. Much less is known about exit and survival patterns of immigrant-owned businesses as there is only a small body of international literature on this topic and little Canadian evidence. This paper addresses this gap by answering two questions. First, do exit and survival patterns (durations) of firm ownership differ between immigrants and individuals born in Canada? Second, what characteristics are associated with lower (or higher) exit rates from business ownership and longer ownership spells among immigrants? The analysis is limited to ownership of private incorporated firms.

    Release date: 2018-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 67-202-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication presents Canada's asset and liability position with non-residents, with a detailed breakdown by claims (direct investment, portfolio, etc.) by industry and by country or organization (United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Japan, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and all other countries). The data also include the foreign holdings of Canada's public debt. In addition, data are provided on Canadian portfolio investments abroad and on the investment income arising from Canada's external assets and liabilities. This publication includes several pages of data analysis accompanied by graphics, definitions and data quality measures. Statistics are derived from surveys, administrative data and other sources.

    Release date: 2012-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200900410909
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The universe for the RDCI consists of all firms known or believed to be involved in the performance or funding of R&D. The frame for this survey has a long history spanning back to the conception of the survey more than 50 years ago. Firms are identified through many sources but most frequently firms are added from the CRA (Canada Revenue Agency) T661 files.

    Release date: 2009-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2008021
    Description:

    This paper makes use of a growth accounting framework to examine the importance of public capital for private sector productivity growth. Most measures of multifactor productivity consider only the inputs of the business sector. This paper produces an alternate measure of multifactor productivity for the business sector that incorporates the impact of public capital. It uses the estimate of the elasticity of business sector output with respect to public capital derived from Macdonald (2008). Over the period, the conventional estimate of MFP growth averages 0.4% per year. About half of this growth is attributable to public capital.

    Release date: 2009-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810213204
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The pay structure for Canada's workers has changed over the past decade. Pay rates have risen in Alberta, especially since 2004. In Ontario and Quebec, earnings in manufacturing have not fallen substantially, despite sharp decreases in employment. Even after the turbulence of the 2001 to 2004 period, average earnings in the CT sector ended up rising 12% in real terms. Along with changes in trade patterns and technology use, demographic trends have also influenced labour market conditions and earnings. This article examines the evolution of earnings in Canada from 1997 to 2007.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005008
    Description:

    Canada's economic growth and competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development (R&D). The number of R&D personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on R&D. In this report we shall present some statistical estimates and definitions concerning R&D personnel. Data on R&D personnel are derived from surveys and from estimates based on various data sources.

    Release date: 2005-05-03
Data (6)

Data (6) ((6 results))

  • Table: 74-508-X
    Description:

    This product contains statistics on registered pension plans at January 1, 2003. The major topic covered are plans and members by areas of employment, jurisdiction of plans registration, type of plan, public and private sector, funding arrangement, employee/employer contribution formula, benefit method and annual contributions made to a registered pension plan.

    Statistics on Retirement compensation arrangements are also included and show the number of trusts, the assets, contributions and benefits for 1991 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-09-22

  • Table: 71-001-P
    Description:

    This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.

    Release date: 2002-08-09

  • Table: 74-401-X
    Description:

    Pension plans in Canada provides information on all employer sponsered pension plans in both the public and private sectors. Information is presented on male and female membership; type of plan (defined benefit, defined contributions) provincial distribution of members; labour force coverage; eligibility conditions; contribution and benefit rates; contributions paid into the plans; and indexing provisions.

    Release date: 2001-12-10

  • Table: 74-401-S
    Description:

    Retirement issues have risen to the forefront of socio-economic debate in Canada through the nineties and will likely gain importance as we enter the new millennium. Employer pension plans are one of the primary programs in place to provide workers with income after retirement.

    Pension plans in Canada: statistical highlights and key tables presents information on the terms, conditions and membership on all employers sponsored pension plans in Canada. This supplement to publication Pension plans in Canada (74-401-XIB) provides analysis and data on registered pension plans. The topics covered include province of employment, labour force/paid workers coverage, type of plan (defined benefit and defined contributions), size of plan, public and private sectors, contributory and non-contributory plans, employee and employer contributions.

    Release date: 2000-10-31

  • Table: 74-201-X
    Description:

    This publication presents information on the income, expenditure and assets of all trusteed pension funds in Canada in both the public and private sectors. Data are presented at the Canada level. The publication contains an analysis of the funds based on the size of the fund, the number of members and the type of benefit. It is a continuation of a series of reports produced since 1957. As a single pool of investment capital in Canada, these funds are surpassed in size only by the aggregate reserves held by the chartered banks.

    Release date: 2000-07-17

  • Table: 75-001-X19990034686
    Description:

    This update of Perspectives' socio-demographic and economic profile of union members provides unionization rates according to the new North American Industry Classification System and the 1991 Standard Occupational Classification. The update, which extends to the provincial level, also includes data on earnings, wage settlements, inflation, and strikes and lockouts.

    Release date: 1999-09-01
Analysis (37)

Analysis (37) (0 to 10 of 37 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019004
    Description: This paper uses Canadian business microdata for 1999 to 2013 to study the characteristics of private-sector medium-sized firms that transition to the large or small size classes. A firm’s size class is defined over a three-year window to ensure that it represents the firm’s long-term state rather than a transient state for a given year. The paper examines what distinguishes medium-sized firms that become large from those that revert to being small.
    Release date: 2019-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018401
    Description:

    It is well established that, in most Western countries, rates of small-business ownership tend to be higher among immigrants than among the native-born. In Canada, the overall shares of taxfilers who owned a private incorporated business in 2010 were similar for immigrants (4.6%) and the Canadian-born (4.8%). However, the rate of business ownership was substantially higher (5.8%) among immigrants who had been in Canada for 10 to 30 years. Much less is known about exit and survival patterns of immigrant-owned businesses as there is only a small body of international literature on this topic and little Canadian evidence. This paper addresses this gap by answering two questions. First, do exit and survival patterns (durations) of firm ownership differ between immigrants and individuals born in Canada? Second, what characteristics are associated with lower (or higher) exit rates from business ownership and longer ownership spells among immigrants? The analysis is limited to ownership of private incorporated firms.

    Release date: 2018-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 67-202-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication presents Canada's asset and liability position with non-residents, with a detailed breakdown by claims (direct investment, portfolio, etc.) by industry and by country or organization (United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Japan, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and all other countries). The data also include the foreign holdings of Canada's public debt. In addition, data are provided on Canadian portfolio investments abroad and on the investment income arising from Canada's external assets and liabilities. This publication includes several pages of data analysis accompanied by graphics, definitions and data quality measures. Statistics are derived from surveys, administrative data and other sources.

    Release date: 2012-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200900410909
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The universe for the RDCI consists of all firms known or believed to be involved in the performance or funding of R&D. The frame for this survey has a long history spanning back to the conception of the survey more than 50 years ago. Firms are identified through many sources but most frequently firms are added from the CRA (Canada Revenue Agency) T661 files.

    Release date: 2009-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2008021
    Description:

    This paper makes use of a growth accounting framework to examine the importance of public capital for private sector productivity growth. Most measures of multifactor productivity consider only the inputs of the business sector. This paper produces an alternate measure of multifactor productivity for the business sector that incorporates the impact of public capital. It uses the estimate of the elasticity of business sector output with respect to public capital derived from Macdonald (2008). Over the period, the conventional estimate of MFP growth averages 0.4% per year. About half of this growth is attributable to public capital.

    Release date: 2009-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810213204
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The pay structure for Canada's workers has changed over the past decade. Pay rates have risen in Alberta, especially since 2004. In Ontario and Quebec, earnings in manufacturing have not fallen substantially, despite sharp decreases in employment. Even after the turbulence of the 2001 to 2004 period, average earnings in the CT sector ended up rising 12% in real terms. Along with changes in trade patterns and technology use, demographic trends have also influenced labour market conditions and earnings. This article examines the evolution of earnings in Canada from 1997 to 2007.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005008
    Description:

    Canada's economic growth and competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development (R&D). The number of R&D personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on R&D. In this report we shall present some statistical estimates and definitions concerning R&D personnel. Data on R&D personnel are derived from surveys and from estimates based on various data sources.

    Release date: 2005-05-03
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001003
    Description:

    Initial results from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), which provides information on the net worth of Canadians, were released on March 15 2001, in The daily. The survey collected information on the value of the financial and non-financial assets owned by each family unit and on the amount of their debt.

    Statistics Canada is currently refining this initial estimate of net worth by adding to it an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer pension plans. This is an important addition to any asset and debt survey as, for many family units, it is likely to be one of the largest assets. With the aging of the population, information on pension accumulations is greatly needed to better understand the financial situation of those nearing retirement. These updated estimates of the Survey of Financial Security will be released in late fall 2001.

    The process for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits is a complex one. This document describes the methodology for estimating that value, for the following groups: a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    This methodology was proposed by Hubert Frenken and Michael Cohen. The former has many years of experience with Statistics Canada working with data on employer pension plans; the latter is a principal with the actuarial consulting firm William M. Mercer. Earlier this year, Statistics Canada carried out a public consultation on the proposed methodology. This report includes updates made as a result of feedback received from data users.

    Release date: 2001-09-05
Date modified: