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All (9)

All (9) ((9 results))

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201900100003
    Description:

    This article focuses on the emergence of the United States and China as the top countries of birth for farm operators that immigrated to Canada between 2011 and 2016.

    It compares immigrant farm operators born in the United States and China who came to Canada between 2011 and 2016 with non-immigrant and other immigrant farm operators. The article explores topics such as where they live and the type and size of the farms they are working on.

    Release date: 2019-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114695
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women with Disabilities" provides a socioeconomic profile of people with disabilities from a gender-based perspective. The prevalence of disability among women, compared with men, is examined across age groups, regions, disability types, and living arrangements. Other areas examined include the use of aids, assistive devices, and medications; help needed; and use of public and specialized transit. Lastly, the education, employment, and income characteristics of persons with disabilities are compared with persons without disabilities.

    Release date: 2017-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014364
    Description:

    During the 1980s and 1990s, immigration was associated with the rise in low-income rates and family-income inequality in Canada. Over the 2000s, there were significant changes in the labour market and in immigrant selection. This paper focuses on the direct effect of immigration on the change in low income and family-income inequality over the 1995-to-2010 period. The paper outlines recent trends in low-income rates and income inequality for both the Canadian-born and immigrants. The low-income rate in Canada fell during the 2000s. Was this driven in part by changes in economic outcomes among immigrants? Inequality increased considerably in the late 1990s. Did immigration contribute to this increase?

    Release date: 2014-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014363
    Description:

    Studies of immigrant well-being primarily focus on economic outcomes. However, immigrants often cite a desire to improve their general quality of life as their main motivation for migrating. This study compares life satisfaction among recent immigrants in Canada with life satisfaction in their country of origin and with the Canadian-born population, and provides an evaluation of the role that national-level economic and social factors play in immigrants’ life satisfaction.

    Release date: 2014-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800510798
    Description:

    In a recent Statistics Canada study, Aneta Bonikowska, David Green and Craig Riddell (2008) use data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to measure the literacy skills of immigrants and the Canadian-born and relate these to earnings outcomes. The analysis takes into account standard demographic information, along with information on where education was obtained and age of migration to further refine their analysis of immigrant/Canadian-born earnings differentials. This article summarizes the results of their research.

    Release date: 2009-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047775
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada has a large and varied immigrant population, a diverse culture and vast distances. But whether individuals are Canadian citizens by birth or by naturalization, they are granted the same rights and responsibilities. Canadian citizenship may thus be viewed as something that creates a shared sense of belonging or an indication of allegiance to Canada. For the foreign-born, acquiring citizenship may be symbolic of the final stage of the migration process, their inclusion into the electoral process and a declaration of their commitment to Canada, their adopted homeland.

    This study explores the characteristics associated with becoming a Canadian citizen among immigrants who have resided in Canada for various periods of time.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410413117
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the economic challenges of moving to a new country.

    Release date: 2004-06-14

  • Table: 93F0023X1996009
    Description:

    Series Description - The Nation Series (1996 Census of Population) is the first released series where basic data at a high level of geography are presented on variables collected by the 1996 Census.There are a total of 143 tables in the Nation Series which cover all census variables.The Complete Edition CDROM, Catalogue number 93F0020XCB96004 contains the cumulative set of all data tables from all Nation Series CDROMs.This comprehensive CDROM provides a full range of statistics on characteristics of the population which includes:Demographic information (100% data only for Age and Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Unions); Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages; Aboriginal Origin, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; Family, Dwellings and Household Information; as well as Individual and Family Income. Selected variables, such as occupation, are available to illustrate the analytical potential of the data based on cross-tabulations (i.e. sex by age and occupation).These data are national in coverage and provide information for Canada, provinces and territories and, in some tabulations, census metropolitan area levels. Some tables include comparisons with data from earlier censuses to provide an historical perspective.A variety of Nation Series data table extracts presenting social and economic characteristics of the Canadian population are available at the Statistics Canada Census Web site (www.statcan.gc.ca).

    Release date: 1997-11-04
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 93F0023X1996009
    Description:

    Series Description - The Nation Series (1996 Census of Population) is the first released series where basic data at a high level of geography are presented on variables collected by the 1996 Census.There are a total of 143 tables in the Nation Series which cover all census variables.The Complete Edition CDROM, Catalogue number 93F0020XCB96004 contains the cumulative set of all data tables from all Nation Series CDROMs.This comprehensive CDROM provides a full range of statistics on characteristics of the population which includes:Demographic information (100% data only for Age and Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Unions); Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages; Aboriginal Origin, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; Family, Dwellings and Household Information; as well as Individual and Family Income. Selected variables, such as occupation, are available to illustrate the analytical potential of the data based on cross-tabulations (i.e. sex by age and occupation).These data are national in coverage and provide information for Canada, provinces and territories and, in some tabulations, census metropolitan area levels. Some tables include comparisons with data from earlier censuses to provide an historical perspective.A variety of Nation Series data table extracts presenting social and economic characteristics of the Canadian population are available at the Statistics Canada Census Web site (www.statcan.gc.ca).

    Release date: 1997-11-04
Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) ((8 results))

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201900100003
    Description:

    This article focuses on the emergence of the United States and China as the top countries of birth for farm operators that immigrated to Canada between 2011 and 2016.

    It compares immigrant farm operators born in the United States and China who came to Canada between 2011 and 2016 with non-immigrant and other immigrant farm operators. The article explores topics such as where they live and the type and size of the farms they are working on.

    Release date: 2019-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114695
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women with Disabilities" provides a socioeconomic profile of people with disabilities from a gender-based perspective. The prevalence of disability among women, compared with men, is examined across age groups, regions, disability types, and living arrangements. Other areas examined include the use of aids, assistive devices, and medications; help needed; and use of public and specialized transit. Lastly, the education, employment, and income characteristics of persons with disabilities are compared with persons without disabilities.

    Release date: 2017-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014364
    Description:

    During the 1980s and 1990s, immigration was associated with the rise in low-income rates and family-income inequality in Canada. Over the 2000s, there were significant changes in the labour market and in immigrant selection. This paper focuses on the direct effect of immigration on the change in low income and family-income inequality over the 1995-to-2010 period. The paper outlines recent trends in low-income rates and income inequality for both the Canadian-born and immigrants. The low-income rate in Canada fell during the 2000s. Was this driven in part by changes in economic outcomes among immigrants? Inequality increased considerably in the late 1990s. Did immigration contribute to this increase?

    Release date: 2014-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014363
    Description:

    Studies of immigrant well-being primarily focus on economic outcomes. However, immigrants often cite a desire to improve their general quality of life as their main motivation for migrating. This study compares life satisfaction among recent immigrants in Canada with life satisfaction in their country of origin and with the Canadian-born population, and provides an evaluation of the role that national-level economic and social factors play in immigrants’ life satisfaction.

    Release date: 2014-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800510798
    Description:

    In a recent Statistics Canada study, Aneta Bonikowska, David Green and Craig Riddell (2008) use data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to measure the literacy skills of immigrants and the Canadian-born and relate these to earnings outcomes. The analysis takes into account standard demographic information, along with information on where education was obtained and age of migration to further refine their analysis of immigrant/Canadian-born earnings differentials. This article summarizes the results of their research.

    Release date: 2009-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047775
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada has a large and varied immigrant population, a diverse culture and vast distances. But whether individuals are Canadian citizens by birth or by naturalization, they are granted the same rights and responsibilities. Canadian citizenship may thus be viewed as something that creates a shared sense of belonging or an indication of allegiance to Canada. For the foreign-born, acquiring citizenship may be symbolic of the final stage of the migration process, their inclusion into the electoral process and a declaration of their commitment to Canada, their adopted homeland.

    This study explores the characteristics associated with becoming a Canadian citizen among immigrants who have resided in Canada for various periods of time.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410413117
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the economic challenges of moving to a new country.

    Release date: 2004-06-14
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