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    • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2019007
      Description:

      This interactive tool allows users to visualize income data of census families and persons not in census families by type of family and income source for Canada, provinces/territories and census metropolitan area/census agglomeration. It shows the most recent data available from the Annual income estimates for Census families and individuals (T1 Family file). For the national and provincial levels, some data are presented from the year 2000 and onward.

      Release date: 2021-07-15

    • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020002
      Description:

      Administrative data sets have become increasingly popular sources of information to study mobility across generations. However, the inclusion of parent-child pairs depends on the primary purpose for which the data was collected. In the case of tax records, both parents and children must have worked and filed their taxes, and the children's labour market entry must have happened before they left the parental home. This paper documents selection in samples of parent-child pairs constructed from personal income tax records from Canada, and discusses implications for intergenerational research. It takes advantage of the fact that Statistics Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) includes both survey and administrative data to inform the nature and severity of the resulting sample selection. Results show that respondents who were successfully linked to their parents are more educated, and are more likely to have grown up in better educated, nuclear families. However, correcting for sample selection suggests that there is no bias in unadjusted estimates.

      Release date: 2020-03-17

    • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020003
      Description:

      This study investigates the suitability of Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) for research on intergenerational income mobility. The LISA combines survey data, collected biennially since 2012, and the personal income tax records of both respondents and their past and present family members. In comparison, existing work on intergenerational mobility in Canada has often used the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), a purely administrative dataset based on the universe of tax filers. The IID's size has allowed researchers to describe the experience of mobility of narrowly defined geographic units and cohorts. However, its potential to investigate the mechanisms underlying these patterns is limited, given the small set of variables it informs. As such, the LISA is a promising candidate to further our understanding of the drivers of mobility. This study reproduces the analysis from four key papers that have documented the intergenerational transmission of income in Canada using the IID. Despite having a much smaller sample size and a different approach to the establishment of parent-child links, it finds that the LISA produces results that are consistent with the existing literature. This study also explores the sensitivity of rank-rank estimates to the choice of different specification and present results that will guide the methodological choices to be made by users of the LISA intergenerational family files in combination with LISA variables from the survey data.

      Release date: 2020-03-17

    • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019007
      Description:

      Not having a Social Insurance Number (SIN) and not filing taxes may represent challenges to access government programs and supports such as the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) and the Canada Learning Bond (CLB). Limited data availability has prevented a full assessment of the extent of these access challenges. This study attempts to address this knowledge gap by analyzing overall differences in SIN possession and tax-filing uptake by family income, levels of parental education, family type and Indigenous identity of the child and age of children using the 2016 Census data augmented with tax-filing and Social Insurance Number possession indicator flags.

      Release date: 2019-06-21

    • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500154931
      Description:

      Using Statistics Canada data from multiple cycles of the General Social Survey, this chapter of Women in Canada examines gender differences in the allocation of time to both primary activities and simultaneous activities (i.e., those done concurrently with other activities), focusing on unpaid work and leisure. It also estimates the total work burden of women and men. In addition to gender, age, family type, and immigrant status may affect time use. For this reason, gender differences in time use among these sub-populations are explored.

      Release date: 2018-07-30

    • Table: 98-400-X2016124
      Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration, Census metropolitan area part, Census agglomeration part
      Description:

      This table presents low-income indicators, individual low-income status, age and census family and household type characteristics of persons for the population in private households of Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

      Release date: 2017-09-13

    • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016006
      Description:

      This article in the Census in Brief series describes the family situations of children living in a lone-parent family, in a stepfamily or without their biological or adoptive parents. This document also highlights a few differences by the age of the children and by province and territory.

      Release date: 2017-08-02

    • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2016003
      Description:

      Periodically, income statistics are updated to reflect the most recent population estimates from the Census. Accordingly, with the release of the 2014 data from the Canadian Income Survey, Statistics Canada has revised estimates for 2006 to 2013 using new population totals from the 2011 Census. This paper provides unrevised estimates alongside revised estimates for key income series, indicating where the revisions were significant.

      Release date: 2016-07-08

    • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114235
      Description:

      The majority of women and girls in Canada live in families although there is much diversity in their particular living arrangements. This chapter of Women in Canada begins with a brief overview of the family context and living arrangements of girls aged 14 and under but focuses primarily on those of women aged 15 and over. Topics to be examined include the conjugal status of women, that is, the extent to which women are in legal marriages or common-law unions, and whether these women in couples are opposite-sex or same-sex or include children in the home. In addition, trends related to women in stepfamilies, divorced or separated women and lone-mother families will be analysed. Other living arrangements of women, such as living alone, with relatives, or only with non-relatives, as well as fertility patterns, will also be explored.

      Release date: 2015-11-10

    • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015002
      Description:

      In the early decades of the 20th century, lone-parent families were relatively prevalent. The proportion of children who lived with a lone parent was nearly as high in 1931 as it was in 1981, though the circumstances of these families were often very different. This edition of Canadian Megatrends takes a look at long-term trends in children's living arrangements in Canada.

      Release date: 2015-02-24
    Data (20)

    Data (20) (0 to 10 of 20 results)

    Analysis (37)

    Analysis (37) (0 to 10 of 37 results)

    • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020002
      Description:

      Administrative data sets have become increasingly popular sources of information to study mobility across generations. However, the inclusion of parent-child pairs depends on the primary purpose for which the data was collected. In the case of tax records, both parents and children must have worked and filed their taxes, and the children's labour market entry must have happened before they left the parental home. This paper documents selection in samples of parent-child pairs constructed from personal income tax records from Canada, and discusses implications for intergenerational research. It takes advantage of the fact that Statistics Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) includes both survey and administrative data to inform the nature and severity of the resulting sample selection. Results show that respondents who were successfully linked to their parents are more educated, and are more likely to have grown up in better educated, nuclear families. However, correcting for sample selection suggests that there is no bias in unadjusted estimates.

      Release date: 2020-03-17

    • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2020003
      Description:

      This study investigates the suitability of Canada's Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) for research on intergenerational income mobility. The LISA combines survey data, collected biennially since 2012, and the personal income tax records of both respondents and their past and present family members. In comparison, existing work on intergenerational mobility in Canada has often used the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), a purely administrative dataset based on the universe of tax filers. The IID's size has allowed researchers to describe the experience of mobility of narrowly defined geographic units and cohorts. However, its potential to investigate the mechanisms underlying these patterns is limited, given the small set of variables it informs. As such, the LISA is a promising candidate to further our understanding of the drivers of mobility. This study reproduces the analysis from four key papers that have documented the intergenerational transmission of income in Canada using the IID. Despite having a much smaller sample size and a different approach to the establishment of parent-child links, it finds that the LISA produces results that are consistent with the existing literature. This study also explores the sensitivity of rank-rank estimates to the choice of different specification and present results that will guide the methodological choices to be made by users of the LISA intergenerational family files in combination with LISA variables from the survey data.

      Release date: 2020-03-17

    • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019007
      Description:

      Not having a Social Insurance Number (SIN) and not filing taxes may represent challenges to access government programs and supports such as the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) and the Canada Learning Bond (CLB). Limited data availability has prevented a full assessment of the extent of these access challenges. This study attempts to address this knowledge gap by analyzing overall differences in SIN possession and tax-filing uptake by family income, levels of parental education, family type and Indigenous identity of the child and age of children using the 2016 Census data augmented with tax-filing and Social Insurance Number possession indicator flags.

      Release date: 2019-06-21

    • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500154931
      Description:

      Using Statistics Canada data from multiple cycles of the General Social Survey, this chapter of Women in Canada examines gender differences in the allocation of time to both primary activities and simultaneous activities (i.e., those done concurrently with other activities), focusing on unpaid work and leisure. It also estimates the total work burden of women and men. In addition to gender, age, family type, and immigrant status may affect time use. For this reason, gender differences in time use among these sub-populations are explored.

      Release date: 2018-07-30

    • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016006
      Description:

      This article in the Census in Brief series describes the family situations of children living in a lone-parent family, in a stepfamily or without their biological or adoptive parents. This document also highlights a few differences by the age of the children and by province and territory.

      Release date: 2017-08-02

    • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2016003
      Description:

      Periodically, income statistics are updated to reflect the most recent population estimates from the Census. Accordingly, with the release of the 2014 data from the Canadian Income Survey, Statistics Canada has revised estimates for 2006 to 2013 using new population totals from the 2011 Census. This paper provides unrevised estimates alongside revised estimates for key income series, indicating where the revisions were significant.

      Release date: 2016-07-08

    • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114235
      Description:

      The majority of women and girls in Canada live in families although there is much diversity in their particular living arrangements. This chapter of Women in Canada begins with a brief overview of the family context and living arrangements of girls aged 14 and under but focuses primarily on those of women aged 15 and over. Topics to be examined include the conjugal status of women, that is, the extent to which women are in legal marriages or common-law unions, and whether these women in couples are opposite-sex or same-sex or include children in the home. In addition, trends related to women in stepfamilies, divorced or separated women and lone-mother families will be analysed. Other living arrangements of women, such as living alone, with relatives, or only with non-relatives, as well as fertility patterns, will also be explored.

      Release date: 2015-11-10

    • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015002
      Description:

      In the early decades of the 20th century, lone-parent families were relatively prevalent. The proportion of children who lived with a lone parent was nearly as high in 1931 as it was in 1981, though the circumstances of these families were often very different. This edition of Canadian Megatrends takes a look at long-term trends in children's living arrangements in Canada.

      Release date: 2015-02-24

    • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

      Release date: 2013-03-05

    • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111430
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      Although Canada fared better in the 2008 economic downturn than many other countries, increasing levels of household debt remain a concern. This article explores rising levels of household debt over the past 40 years using National Accounts data. It also uses data from the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey to examine which types of families are most likely to experience high levels of debt - that is, to make debt payments greater than 40% of their pre-tax household income, to have a debt-to-asset ratio of over 80%, and to have a high debt-to-income ratio relative to other family types.

      Release date: 2011-04-21
    Reference (3)

    Reference (3) ((3 results))

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002006
      Description:

      This user's guide provides a detailed description of the CD-ROM Income trends in Canada (Catalogue no. 13F0022XCB). It also provides a glossary and a description of the major concepts, as well as an overview of the data source, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

      Release date: 2002-11-19

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0010X
      Description:

      The publication guides the user through the vast array of labour market and income data sources. It offers detailed descriptions of the various surveys, including the data collected. A summary chart gives snapshot information for comparisons.

      Release date: 2000-09-13

    • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89M0015G
      Description:

      The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is a long-term research program (started in 1994) that will track a large sample of children over many years, enabling researchers to monitor children's well-being and development.

      Not all the information collected for the first cycle of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth are included in this first microdata file. The second release will be in 1997.

      Release date: 1996-12-18
    Date modified: