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All (9) ((9 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-633-X2019001
    Description:

    The mandate of the Analytical Studies Branch (ASB) is to provide high-quality, relevant and timely information on economic, health and social issues that are important to Canadians. The branch strategically makes use of expert knowledge and a large range of statistical sources to describe, draw inferences from, and make objective and scientifically supported deductions about the evolving nature of the Canadian economy and society. Research questions are addressed by applying leading-edge methods, including microsimulation and predictive analytics using a range of linked and integrated administrative and survey data. In supporting greater access to data, ASB linked data are made available to external researchers and policy makers to support evidence-based decision making. Research results are disseminated by the branch using a range of mediums (i.e., research papers, studies, infographics, videos, and blogs) to meet user needs. The branch also provides analytical support and training, feedback, and quality assurance to the wide range of programs within and outside Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2019-05-29

  • Table: 13-10-0572-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 105-0035)
    Frequency: Every 2 years
    Description:

    This table contains 120000 series, with data for years 2000 - 2000 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years), and is no longer being released. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (125 items: Prince Edward Island; Urban Health Region, Prince Edward Island (Peer group I); Rural Health Region, Prince Edward Island (Peer group E); Nova Scotia; ...);  Age group (10 items: Total, 15-74 years; 15-19 years; 20-34 years; 20-24 years; ...);  Sex (3 items: Both sexes; Males; Females);  Decision latitude at work (4 items: Total population for the variable decision latitude at work; High decision latitude at work; Low or medium decision latitude at work; Decision latitude at work, not stated);  Characteristics (8 items: Number of persons; Low 95% confidence interval - number of persons; High 95% confidence interval - number of persons; Coefficient of variation for number of persons; ...).

    Release date: 2017-03-06

  • Public use microdata: 18-505-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS) is sponsored by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Finance Canada and the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada. Specifically, the survey will shed light on Canadians' knowledge, abilities and behaviour concerning financial decision-making. In other words, how Canadians understand their financial situation, the financial services available to them and their plans for the future. The survey is designed to collect information surrounding respondents' approaches to day-to-day money management and budgeting, longer term money management and general financial planning.

    Release date: 2015-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2015010
    Description:

    This paper examines the career expectations of Canadian youth over time, using a longitudinal database, to assess when youth begin to demonstrate consistency in their career choices. In this research, youth are said to demonstrate consistency in their career choices when their response to the question "What kind of job or occupation would you be interested in having when you are about 30 years old?" matches with their answers from earlier cycles of the survey in terms of occupation type and required level of education.

    This paper first examines factors contributing to earlier and later consistency in career expectations, followed by a comparison of educational outcomes based on career consistency patterns. The goal of this analysis is to identify differences in educational outcomes based on the career decision making patterns demonstrated by youth.

    This article uses data from the Statistics Canada's Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) collected between the years 2000 and 2010, and focuses on cohort A. The YITS cohort A members were 15 years old in 2000, and were surveyed every 2 years until the age of 25.

    Release date: 2015-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000143
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper explores differences between innovative and non-innovative establishments in business service industries. It focuses on small establishments that supply core technical inputs to other firms: establishments in computer and related services, engineering, and other scientific and technical services.

    The analysis begins by examining the incidence of innovation within the small firm population. Forty percent of small businesses report introducing new or improved products, processes or organizational forms. Among these businesses, product innovation dominates over process or organizational change. A majority of these establishments reveal an ongoing commitment to innovation programs by introducing innovations on a regular basis. By contrast, businesses that do not introduce new or improved products, processes or organizational methods reveal little supporting evidence of innovation activity.

    The paper then investigates differences in strategic intensity between innovative and non-innovative businesses. Innovators attach greater importance to financial management and capital acquisition. Innovators also place more emphasis on recruiting skilled labour and on promoting incentive compensation. These distinctions are sensible - among small firms in R&D-intensive industries, financing and human resource competencies play a critical role in the innovation process.

    A final section examines whether the obstacles to innovation differ between innovators and non-innovators. Innovators are more likely to report difficulties related to market success, imitation, and skill restrictions. Evidence of learning-by-doing is more apparent within a multivariate framework. The probability of encountering risk-related obstacles and input restrictions is higher among establishments that engage in R&D and use intellectual property rights, both key elements of the innovation process. Many obstacles to innovation are also more apparent for businesses that stress financing, marketing, production or human resource strategies.

    Release date: 2000-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1996003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines a number of significant changes (real or perceived) related to wages and earnings, in the Canadian context, since the recession of the early 1980s.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 61F0057M1998002
    Description:

    Survey highlights

    Release date: 1998-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 61F0057M1998001
    Description:

    The Survey on Preparedness of Canadian Business for the Year 2000 was conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Task Force Year 2000 to assess the business community's readiness for the Year 2000 computer problem. The survey found that more than half of Canadian businesses with more than five employees are doing nothing to address this issue. Moreover, less than 1 in 10 firms have a formal plan to assess, convert and test systems for the date change to 2000. Some 2% of firms have implemented and completed all phases of a plan, and a further 16% have taken less formal steps and say their systems are confirmed to be ready for 2000.This report takes a closer look at the survey results to determine how businesses in different industries and size categories are preparing for potential difficulties, and it assesses the general cost and magnitude of fixing the problem.

    Release date: 1998-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1996009
    Description:

    In this paper, we examine the predictors of an individual's ability to access occupations offering autonomy and authority in the workplace. This paper uses results from analysis of data from the 1993 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics and the 1994 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 1997-12-31
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 13-10-0572-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 105-0035)
    Frequency: Every 2 years
    Description:

    This table contains 120000 series, with data for years 2000 - 2000 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years), and is no longer being released. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (125 items: Prince Edward Island; Urban Health Region, Prince Edward Island (Peer group I); Rural Health Region, Prince Edward Island (Peer group E); Nova Scotia; ...);  Age group (10 items: Total, 15-74 years; 15-19 years; 20-34 years; 20-24 years; ...);  Sex (3 items: Both sexes; Males; Females);  Decision latitude at work (4 items: Total population for the variable decision latitude at work; High decision latitude at work; Low or medium decision latitude at work; Decision latitude at work, not stated);  Characteristics (8 items: Number of persons; Low 95% confidence interval - number of persons; High 95% confidence interval - number of persons; Coefficient of variation for number of persons; ...).

    Release date: 2017-03-06

  • Public use microdata: 18-505-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS) is sponsored by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Finance Canada and the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada. Specifically, the survey will shed light on Canadians' knowledge, abilities and behaviour concerning financial decision-making. In other words, how Canadians understand their financial situation, the financial services available to them and their plans for the future. The survey is designed to collect information surrounding respondents' approaches to day-to-day money management and budgeting, longer term money management and general financial planning.

    Release date: 2015-03-23
Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2015010
    Description:

    This paper examines the career expectations of Canadian youth over time, using a longitudinal database, to assess when youth begin to demonstrate consistency in their career choices. In this research, youth are said to demonstrate consistency in their career choices when their response to the question "What kind of job or occupation would you be interested in having when you are about 30 years old?" matches with their answers from earlier cycles of the survey in terms of occupation type and required level of education.

    This paper first examines factors contributing to earlier and later consistency in career expectations, followed by a comparison of educational outcomes based on career consistency patterns. The goal of this analysis is to identify differences in educational outcomes based on the career decision making patterns demonstrated by youth.

    This article uses data from the Statistics Canada's Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) collected between the years 2000 and 2010, and focuses on cohort A. The YITS cohort A members were 15 years old in 2000, and were surveyed every 2 years until the age of 25.

    Release date: 2015-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000143
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper explores differences between innovative and non-innovative establishments in business service industries. It focuses on small establishments that supply core technical inputs to other firms: establishments in computer and related services, engineering, and other scientific and technical services.

    The analysis begins by examining the incidence of innovation within the small firm population. Forty percent of small businesses report introducing new or improved products, processes or organizational forms. Among these businesses, product innovation dominates over process or organizational change. A majority of these establishments reveal an ongoing commitment to innovation programs by introducing innovations on a regular basis. By contrast, businesses that do not introduce new or improved products, processes or organizational methods reveal little supporting evidence of innovation activity.

    The paper then investigates differences in strategic intensity between innovative and non-innovative businesses. Innovators attach greater importance to financial management and capital acquisition. Innovators also place more emphasis on recruiting skilled labour and on promoting incentive compensation. These distinctions are sensible - among small firms in R&D-intensive industries, financing and human resource competencies play a critical role in the innovation process.

    A final section examines whether the obstacles to innovation differ between innovators and non-innovators. Innovators are more likely to report difficulties related to market success, imitation, and skill restrictions. Evidence of learning-by-doing is more apparent within a multivariate framework. The probability of encountering risk-related obstacles and input restrictions is higher among establishments that engage in R&D and use intellectual property rights, both key elements of the innovation process. Many obstacles to innovation are also more apparent for businesses that stress financing, marketing, production or human resource strategies.

    Release date: 2000-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1996003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines a number of significant changes (real or perceived) related to wages and earnings, in the Canadian context, since the recession of the early 1980s.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 61F0057M1998002
    Description:

    Survey highlights

    Release date: 1998-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 61F0057M1998001
    Description:

    The Survey on Preparedness of Canadian Business for the Year 2000 was conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Task Force Year 2000 to assess the business community's readiness for the Year 2000 computer problem. The survey found that more than half of Canadian businesses with more than five employees are doing nothing to address this issue. Moreover, less than 1 in 10 firms have a formal plan to assess, convert and test systems for the date change to 2000. Some 2% of firms have implemented and completed all phases of a plan, and a further 16% have taken less formal steps and say their systems are confirmed to be ready for 2000.This report takes a closer look at the survey results to determine how businesses in different industries and size categories are preparing for potential difficulties, and it assesses the general cost and magnitude of fixing the problem.

    Release date: 1998-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1996009
    Description:

    In this paper, we examine the predictors of an individual's ability to access occupations offering autonomy and authority in the workplace. This paper uses results from analysis of data from the 1993 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics and the 1994 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 1997-12-31
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-633-X2019001
    Description:

    The mandate of the Analytical Studies Branch (ASB) is to provide high-quality, relevant and timely information on economic, health and social issues that are important to Canadians. The branch strategically makes use of expert knowledge and a large range of statistical sources to describe, draw inferences from, and make objective and scientifically supported deductions about the evolving nature of the Canadian economy and society. Research questions are addressed by applying leading-edge methods, including microsimulation and predictive analytics using a range of linked and integrated administrative and survey data. In supporting greater access to data, ASB linked data are made available to external researchers and policy makers to support evidence-based decision making. Research results are disseminated by the branch using a range of mediums (i.e., research papers, studies, infographics, videos, and blogs) to meet user needs. The branch also provides analytical support and training, feedback, and quality assurance to the wide range of programs within and outside Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2019-05-29
Date modified: