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  • 13C0015
    Description:

    This annual product characterizes the Canadian population by income and demographics. Data may be requested by gender for marital status, age groups, counts by single year of age, sources of income, income distribution by age group, taxes paid, selected deductions and benefits, median employment income, median total income and median after-tax income, plus national and provincial indices of median total income. The statistics are derived primarily from the annual tax file provided by the Canada Revenue Agency.

    Data for some geographic areas are available starting from 1986. The latest data (2017) can be requested for Canada, provinces and territories, federal electoral districts, economic regions, census divisions, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census tracts and certain postal geographies.

    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • 13C0016
    Description:

    Annual information is available on census families (couple families and lone-parent families) and persons not in census families.

    Data for families may be requested by age group of family members, number and age of children, average family size, total family income range by age or by number of children, sources of family income, economic dependency, low income families, after-tax income, single-earner and dual-earner families and wife's contribution to total husband-wife employment income. Statistics on persons not in census families provide details on age group, income group and sources of income. The statistics are derived primarily from the annual tax file provided by the Canada Revenue Agency.

    Data for couple families, lone-parent families and persons not in census families can be requested beginning in 1990. The latest data (2017) can be requested for Canada, provinces and territories, federal electoral districts, economic regions, census divisions, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census tracts and certain postal geographies.

    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • 89C0022
    Description:

    Annual information is available on Canadian senior families and individuals. In these tables, a senior is defined as a person who is 55 years of age or older, and senior families are those in which the eldest spouse or parent is a senior. Data may be requested for the demographic profiles of senior family types by age group or for individuals in senior families, by age and gender. Also available are income profiles of senior couple families, senior lone-parent families, senior persons not in Census Families and senior individuals. The statistics are derived primarily from the annual tax file provided by the Canada Revenue Agency.

    Data for some geographic areas are available starting from 1990. The latest data (2017) can be requested for Canada, provinces and territories, federal electoral districts, economic regions, census divisions, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census tracts and certain postal geographies.

    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • 13C0017
    Description:

    The Economic Dependency Profile shows the number of men and women receiving different government transfers and the total amount of each payment type.

    A region's dependency on transfer payments is demonstrated through the Economic Dependency Ratio (EDR). The EDR is the ratio of transfer payment dollars for every hundred dollars of employment income. The EDR is provided for the area requested and is also shown as a percentage of the ratio for the province or territory and for Canada. The statistics are derived primarily from the annual tax file provided by the Canada Revenue Agency.

    Data for some geographic areas are available as far back as 1986. The latest data (2014) can be requested for Canada, provinces and territories, federal electoral districts, economic regions, census divisions, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census tracts and certain postal geographies.

    Release date: 2016-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201100111514
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This article examines patterns of interprovincial migration in Canada, including overall net migration for each province and territory as well as migratiory flows between provinces and territories. Data on interprovincial migration analysed in this article for the years 2007/2008 and 2008/2009, as well as historical data from 1971/1972 are based on administrative files, specifically, income tax files, which are considered final. A brief analysis of the preliminary 2009/2010 data, derived from Canada Child Tax Benefit files, is also included.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Table: 89-628-X2008011
    Description:

    The Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is Canada's national survey that gathers information about adults and children whose daily activities are limited by a physical, mental, or other health-related condition or problem.

    This report presents a series of tables on the;Total income; Old age security pension and guaranteed income supplement; Canada / Quebec pension plan benefits; Child tax benefit; Other government income; Employment income; Investment income; Retirement income.

    Release date: 2008-10-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513210
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There was almost no change in the proportion of children under age 18 living in a low-income family from 1989 to 2004, despite government interventions and a strong economy since the 1990/1992 recession. In addition, the disparity between well-off and low-income children increased, the economic situation of families of well-off children having improved. Family situation and parents, insufficient employment had the greatest influence on children's vulnerability to low income. It is a changing phenomenon, as few children remain in low income for several consecutive years.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005245
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada witnessed a dramatic decline in welfare participation from 1993/94 to the end of the nineties - one almost on a par with the U.S., but without the sort of landmark legislation adopted there. We explore the dynamics of Social Assistance usage in Canada over this period using data based on tax files for between 2 and 4 million individuals in each year from Canada's Longitudinal Administrative Data - the LAD. The unique attributes of this base - size, longitudinal nature, and income information availability - allow us, for the first time, to calculate annual incidence, entry and exit rates both at the national and provincial levels, broken down by family type. We discuss the variety of experiences of these groups; we identify the policy context and discuss the implications of the findings.

    Release date: 2005-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005246
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes findings from the research paper entitled Social Assistance Use in Canada: National and Provincial Trends in Incidence, Entry and Exit. For many Canadian families, Social Assistance (SA) usage reflects near-destitution and an exclusion from the social and economic mainstream. For children, it can represent a critical period of disadvantage with potentially lasting effects. While committed to SA, governments worry about cost. Thus, when SA participation rose during the recession of the early 1990s, virtually all provinces instituted changes to reduce SA dependency. Eligibility rules were made tighter, benefit levels cut, and 'snitch' lines introduced. Following these changes, and the economic recovery post-1995, the number of SA-dependent individuals dropped from 3.1 million to under 2 million by 2000, while benefits received fell from $14.3b in 1994 to $10.4b in 2001 (current dollars).

    This paper maps the cycle of SA dependency, focusing on empirical records of SA entry, exit, and annual participation rates, placing these in the economic and policy context of the 1990s. The paper begins with a description of the database used, sample selection and editing procedures, the unit of analysis, a definition of SA participation, and the measure of entry and exit from SA. It then turns to the economic and policy backdrop of the 1990s, before showing results at the national and provincial levels. We conclude with a summary of main findings.

    Release date: 2005-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004219
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates trends in family income inequality in the 1980s and 1990s, with particular attention paid to the recovery period of the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-12-16
Data (7)

Data (7) ((7 results))

  • Table: 89-628-X2008011
    Description:

    The Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is Canada's national survey that gathers information about adults and children whose daily activities are limited by a physical, mental, or other health-related condition or problem.

    This report presents a series of tables on the;Total income; Old age security pension and guaranteed income supplement; Canada / Quebec pension plan benefits; Child tax benefit; Other government income; Employment income; Investment income; Retirement income.

    Release date: 2008-10-14

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Table: 21F0018X
    Description:

    This slide presentation provides a profile of basic structures and trends in rural and small town Canada.

    Release date: 2001-05-28

  • Public use microdata: 95M0013X
    Description:

    This file provides data on the characteristics of the population such as ethnic origin, labour force activity and income levels. It contains 122 variables.

    The Microdata Files contain samples of anonymous responses to the 1996 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. PUMFs enable the development of statistical information about Canadians, the families and households to which they belong, and the dwellings in which they live.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. This makes PUMFs a powerful research tools. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. These provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    All subject matter covered by the census is included in these files.

    The 1996 PUMFs will only be released on CD-ROM using microcomputer applications.

    Release date: 1999-04-15

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013565
    Description:

    A clear understanding of the size and extent of intergenerational transfers made by governments is central to any informed debate dealing with "Intergenerational Equity." Accordingly, the aim of this chapter is to provide a descriptive backdrop to these discussions by examining how current policy at all levels of government in Canada redistributes income among the different generations.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Public use microdata: 89M0013X
    Description:

    This public use microdata file provides unaggregated data on the Aboriginal adult population - those who identify with their Aboriginal origin(s) and those who do not. For persons who identify, it contains almost 700 variables from the 1991 survey, such as, the group with which they identify, language proficiency, disability, chronic health conditions, schooling, work experience and the 1991 Census variables such as, income levels, marital status, fertility. The same census variables are provided for the population who does not identify.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

  • Public use microdata: 95M0007X
    Description:

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to unaggregated data. This makes the public use microdata files (PUMFs) powerful research tools. Each file contains anonymous individual responses on a large number of variables. The PUMF user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. Tabulations not included in other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed by using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people. All subject-matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. However, to ensure the anonymity of the respondents, geographic identifiers have been restricted to the provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas. Microdata files have traditionally been disseminated on magnetic tape, which required access to a mainframe computer. For the first time, the 1991 PUMFs will also be available on CD-ROM for microcomputer applications. This file contains data based on a 3% of the population enumerated in the 1991 Census. It provides information on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the Canadian population. The Individual File allows users to return to the base unit of the census, enabling them to group and manipulate the data to suit their own data and research requirements.

    This product provides two basic tools to assist users in accessing and using the 1991 Census Public Use Microdata File - Individuals CD-ROM.

    Release date: 1995-04-11
Analysis (9)

Analysis (9) ((9 results))

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201100111514
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This article examines patterns of interprovincial migration in Canada, including overall net migration for each province and territory as well as migratiory flows between provinces and territories. Data on interprovincial migration analysed in this article for the years 2007/2008 and 2008/2009, as well as historical data from 1971/1972 are based on administrative files, specifically, income tax files, which are considered final. A brief analysis of the preliminary 2009/2010 data, derived from Canada Child Tax Benefit files, is also included.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513210
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There was almost no change in the proportion of children under age 18 living in a low-income family from 1989 to 2004, despite government interventions and a strong economy since the 1990/1992 recession. In addition, the disparity between well-off and low-income children increased, the economic situation of families of well-off children having improved. Family situation and parents, insufficient employment had the greatest influence on children's vulnerability to low income. It is a changing phenomenon, as few children remain in low income for several consecutive years.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005245
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada witnessed a dramatic decline in welfare participation from 1993/94 to the end of the nineties - one almost on a par with the U.S., but without the sort of landmark legislation adopted there. We explore the dynamics of Social Assistance usage in Canada over this period using data based on tax files for between 2 and 4 million individuals in each year from Canada's Longitudinal Administrative Data - the LAD. The unique attributes of this base - size, longitudinal nature, and income information availability - allow us, for the first time, to calculate annual incidence, entry and exit rates both at the national and provincial levels, broken down by family type. We discuss the variety of experiences of these groups; we identify the policy context and discuss the implications of the findings.

    Release date: 2005-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005246
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes findings from the research paper entitled Social Assistance Use in Canada: National and Provincial Trends in Incidence, Entry and Exit. For many Canadian families, Social Assistance (SA) usage reflects near-destitution and an exclusion from the social and economic mainstream. For children, it can represent a critical period of disadvantage with potentially lasting effects. While committed to SA, governments worry about cost. Thus, when SA participation rose during the recession of the early 1990s, virtually all provinces instituted changes to reduce SA dependency. Eligibility rules were made tighter, benefit levels cut, and 'snitch' lines introduced. Following these changes, and the economic recovery post-1995, the number of SA-dependent individuals dropped from 3.1 million to under 2 million by 2000, while benefits received fell from $14.3b in 1994 to $10.4b in 2001 (current dollars).

    This paper maps the cycle of SA dependency, focusing on empirical records of SA entry, exit, and annual participation rates, placing these in the economic and policy context of the 1990s. The paper begins with a description of the database used, sample selection and editing procedures, the unit of analysis, a definition of SA participation, and the measure of entry and exit from SA. It then turns to the economic and policy backdrop of the 1990s, before showing results at the national and provincial levels. We conclude with a summary of main findings.

    Release date: 2005-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004219
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates trends in family income inequality in the 1980s and 1990s, with particular attention paid to the recovery period of the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003192
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 1990s were characterized by substantial declines in the number of welfare recipients in most Canadian provinces. These declines occurred in a period when most provincial governments lowered benefits and tightened eligibility rules. What happened to the economic well-being of those who left welfare in the 1990s? Using longitudinal tax data, this study examines the short and long-term outcomes of welfare leavers across three dimensions: earnings, disposable income and low-income. The role of marriage in post-welfare outcomes is also investigated.

    Release date: 2003-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1999002
    Description:

    This report presents results from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) for a variety of important time series and compares the estimates from the two sources.

    Release date: 1999-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997109
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In addition to confirming a wage gap between Canadian workers as a whole and those of Aboriginal origin, our research also generated new findings: there is greater disparity in the distribution of wages among Aboriginals than among Canadian workers as a whole, even after allowing for demographic differences.

    Our analysis does not stop there. Indeed, this analysis can hide considerable wage dispersions between Aboriginal groups since appreciable wage gaps were noted between these groups. Having said this, wage dispersion is most likely greater for certain Aboriginal groups than others. Since this aspect has never been studied before, the purpose of this paper is to document differences in wage dispersion for the four main Aboriginal groups. Our results show that North American Indians living on reserves are the most disadvantaged Aboriginal group because their earnings are substantially lower than those of the other groups.

    Release date: 1998-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1996007
    Description:

    This study identifies differences between various aggregate, average and other income estimates produced by the 1993 income data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics and the Survey of Consumer Finances. It also quantifies these differences where possible.

    Release date: 1997-12-31
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via paper questionnaires and personal interviews conducted in January, February and March after the reference year. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces and the 3 territories. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2002-12-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1997006
    Description:

    This report documents the edit and imputation approach taken in processing Wave 1 income data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1997-12-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1993015
    Description:

    This paper outlines the results of an initial evaluation of the income items in the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) test 3B.

    Release date: 1995-12-30
Date modified: