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  • Table: 12-581-X
    Description:

    Canada at a Glance presents current statistics on Canadian demography, education, health and aging, justice, housing, income, labour market, household, economy, travel, finance, agriculture, foreign trade and environment. This booklet also includes important international comparisons, so that readers can see how Canada stacks up against its neighbours. Updated yearly, Canada at a Glance is a very useful reference for those who want quick access to current Canadian statistics.

    Release date: 2018-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015097
    Description:

    Canada’s aggregate productivity performance has closely tracked changes in Canada’s trading environment. To gain a better understanding of the link, the Economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada has conducted a set of studies that investigate whether and how changes in the trading environment, brought about by trade liberalization policies and exchange-rate movements, contributed to productivity growth. The firm-level analysis provides insights into the productivity dynamics that arise from within-industry growth and restructuring as resources are shifted from declining to growing industries. The paper provides an overview of the key Canadian empirical findings over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2015-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013086
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In order to study the importance of material offshoring (defined in this paper as the use of intermediate imported materials) at the industry level, it is generally assumed that the import share of each input commodity for a particular industry is similar to that for the economy as a whole-because import data tend to be available only for the latter. This is referred to as the proportionality-based measure of offshoring.

    Recent advances in administrative trade data permit the development of more industry-specific measures of imports. However, these measures generally capture the agent that engages in importation. These firms may only be performing an intermediation role and may be located in industries (e.g., trade or finance) that differ from the industry of use. This study reports on these more direct measures of industry imports using Canadian micro import data as well as hybrid measures that make use of both input and import information. Estimates from various alternatives are then compared to estimates derived from a survey that asked for information on import intensity as part of a more general investigation of innovation.

    Release date: 2013-11-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-605-X201300411819
    Description:

    This is an update of the 2009 article Revisions to international merchandise trade statistics, accounting for changes resulting from increased timeliness in the release of merchandise trade statistics.

    Release date: 2013-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series is based on the research paper Natural Resources, the Terms of Trade, and Real Income Growth in Canada: 1870 to 2010. The research paper examines the importance of resource products in Canada's trade and real income growth.

    Release date: 2012-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012079
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper studies the growth of the Canadian resource economy and the contribution of trading gains arising from increasing terms of trade to real income growth from 1870 to 2010. It combines a historical account of the growth of a succession of natural resources--examining both the production and price history of agriculture, forestry, mining, and oil and gas--with an overview of the impact of these developments on Canadian well-being. It uses estimates of the difference between real income and real output growth, based on measurement theory from the System of National Accounts, to measure trading gains that arose from increasing terms of trade over the period.

    Release date: 2012-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010059
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) data to examine changes in labour productivity, real gross domestic product (GDP), real gross domestic income (GDI), economic aggregates and relative economic growth over time. Real GDI combines changes in production (real GDP), with a trading gain derived from relative price changes. The paper considers two sources of trading gains: the terms of trade and the real exchange rate. For OECD countries, the terms of trade is the more important price ratio, making a contribution to real income growth that is, on average, an order of magnitude larger than the real exchange rate.

    Over long time periods, the most important source of real income growth is changes in production. Over shorter time horizons, however, the trading gain can make noteworthy contributions. Changes in aggregates, like real private consumption or the relative economic performance of nations, are shown to be particularly dependent on the trading gain during the large swings in resource prices that occurred after 2002.

    Release date: 2010-01-28

  • Stats in brief: 13-605-X200900111029
    Description:

    Quarterly international merchandise trade statistics are published approximately six weeks after the reference period. Two weeks later, these data are incorporated into the Income and Expenditure Accounts, at which point they are subject to revision. This note outlines the primary sources of the revisions.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200900210942
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights the key agricultural events in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-11-10
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015097
    Description:

    Canada’s aggregate productivity performance has closely tracked changes in Canada’s trading environment. To gain a better understanding of the link, the Economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada has conducted a set of studies that investigate whether and how changes in the trading environment, brought about by trade liberalization policies and exchange-rate movements, contributed to productivity growth. The firm-level analysis provides insights into the productivity dynamics that arise from within-industry growth and restructuring as resources are shifted from declining to growing industries. The paper provides an overview of the key Canadian empirical findings over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2015-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013086
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In order to study the importance of material offshoring (defined in this paper as the use of intermediate imported materials) at the industry level, it is generally assumed that the import share of each input commodity for a particular industry is similar to that for the economy as a whole-because import data tend to be available only for the latter. This is referred to as the proportionality-based measure of offshoring.

    Recent advances in administrative trade data permit the development of more industry-specific measures of imports. However, these measures generally capture the agent that engages in importation. These firms may only be performing an intermediation role and may be located in industries (e.g., trade or finance) that differ from the industry of use. This study reports on these more direct measures of industry imports using Canadian micro import data as well as hybrid measures that make use of both input and import information. Estimates from various alternatives are then compared to estimates derived from a survey that asked for information on import intensity as part of a more general investigation of innovation.

    Release date: 2013-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series is based on the research paper Natural Resources, the Terms of Trade, and Real Income Growth in Canada: 1870 to 2010. The research paper examines the importance of resource products in Canada's trade and real income growth.

    Release date: 2012-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012079
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper studies the growth of the Canadian resource economy and the contribution of trading gains arising from increasing terms of trade to real income growth from 1870 to 2010. It combines a historical account of the growth of a succession of natural resources--examining both the production and price history of agriculture, forestry, mining, and oil and gas--with an overview of the impact of these developments on Canadian well-being. It uses estimates of the difference between real income and real output growth, based on measurement theory from the System of National Accounts, to measure trading gains that arose from increasing terms of trade over the period.

    Release date: 2012-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010059
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) data to examine changes in labour productivity, real gross domestic product (GDP), real gross domestic income (GDI), economic aggregates and relative economic growth over time. Real GDI combines changes in production (real GDP), with a trading gain derived from relative price changes. The paper considers two sources of trading gains: the terms of trade and the real exchange rate. For OECD countries, the terms of trade is the more important price ratio, making a contribution to real income growth that is, on average, an order of magnitude larger than the real exchange rate.

    Over long time periods, the most important source of real income growth is changes in production. Over shorter time horizons, however, the trading gain can make noteworthy contributions. Changes in aggregates, like real private consumption or the relative economic performance of nations, are shown to be particularly dependent on the trading gain during the large swings in resource prices that occurred after 2002.

    Release date: 2010-01-28

  • Stats in brief: 13-605-X200900111029
    Description:

    Quarterly international merchandise trade statistics are published approximately six weeks after the reference period. Two weeks later, these data are incorporated into the Income and Expenditure Accounts, at which point they are subject to revision. This note outlines the primary sources of the revisions.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200900210942
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights the key agricultural events in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901010945
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A detailed look at the sudden drop in Canada's exports and imports starting last autumn finds that 80% of their declines was concentrated in energy, autos and industrial goods. Consumer and agricultural goods were largely unaffected by the recession.

    Release date: 2009-10-15

  • Stats in brief: 11F0024M20050008661
    Description:

    Canada has reached its innovation-driven stage of development where the country's global competitiveness is critically linked to its ability to rapidly shift to new innovative technologies and to generate high rates of innovation and commercialization of those technologies. The country has made significant progress in terms of the growth of high- and medium-high technology-intensive exports in the last few decades. The share of high- and medium-high-technology manufacturing industries' products in our total exports has increased from 32.1% in 1980 to 44% in 2002, while our dependence on low- and medium-low technology products has shrunk from 48.0% of total exports in 1980 to 41% in 2002. This paper utilizes Statistics Canada data for the period 1980-2003 to examine trends in the technology intensity of Canada's exports. Trends in the revealed comparative advantage as well as the structural trade balance for technology-intensive goods are also examined. The analyses in the paper show that Canada has made some gains in its relative competitive position in the world trade of high- and medium-high technology goods.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007448
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the contribution of public capital to productivity growth in the Canadian business sector. The approach developed here incorporates demand and supply forces, including the contribution of public capital, which may affect productivity performance. We estimate the model using disaggregated data composed of 37-industries in the Canadian business sector from 1961 to 2000. The results indicate that the main contributors to productivity growth, both at the industry and aggregate levels, are technical change and exogenous demand (representing the effect of aggregate income and population growth). Public capital contributed for about 18% of the overall business sector multifactor productivity growth over the 1961 to 2000 period. This is somewhat lower than the figures reported in the literature. However, the magnitudes of the contribution of public capital to productivity growth vary significantly across industries, with the largest impact occurring in transportation, trade and utilities.

    Release date: 2004-11-25
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-605-X201300411819
    Description:

    This is an update of the 2009 article Revisions to international merchandise trade statistics, accounting for changes resulting from increased timeliness in the release of merchandise trade statistics.

    Release date: 2013-06-07
Date modified: