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  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202101100002
    Description:

    Postsecondary students can claim postsecondary education credits to lower their tax obligations (or that of a parent, grandparent, spouse or common-law partner, or their parent or grandparent). Claiming the credits is costless, but it does require knowledge of how the credits work to reduce taxes. As a result, claim rates may be unequal across socio-economic backgrounds, including the level of parental income (a key policy lever for needs-based student financial aid). The purpose of this article is to document claim rates among postsecondary students by level of parental income, as well as to re-assess trends in postsecondary enrolment rates by level of parental income in light of unequal claim rates. These trends were previously established with information on the tax credits in tax data. This study uses data from the T1 Family File (T1FF) and the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS), which have been recently linked for all ten provinces from 2009 onwards.

    Release date: 2021-11-24

  • Table: 11-10-0054-01
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    This table provides individual taxation statistics, including effective tax and transfer rates, the total amount of taxes paid and government transfers received, and the proportion of Canadian taxfilers that pay tax or receive government transfers.

    Release date: 2021-11-12

  • Public use microdata: 62M0004X
    Description:

    The Public-Use Microdata File (PUMF) for the Survey of Household Spending (SHS) provides information on household expenditures as well as selected information on dwelling characteristics and household equipment. The production of this file includes many safeguards to prevent the identification of any one person or household.

    PUMFs were produced on an annual basis for SHS 1997 to 2009, before a redesigned survey was introduced with the 2010 reference year. The SHS 2017 PUMF is the first SHS PUMF based on data collected after the 2010 survey redesign.

    Due to changes to data collection, processing and estimation methods introduced with the 2010 redesign, users are advised not to compare data from SHS 1997 to 2009 with data from any subsequent years, unless otherwise noted.

    Release date: 2021-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016003
    Description:

    Large national mortality cohorts are used to estimate mortality rates for different socioeconomic and population groups, and to conduct research on environmental health. In 2008, Statistics Canada created a cohort linking the 1991 Census to mortality. The present study describes a linkage of the 2001 Census long-form questionnaire respondents aged 19 years and older to the T1 Personal Master File and the Amalgamated Mortality Database. The linkage tracks all deaths over a 10.6-year period (until the end of 2011, to date).

    Release date: 2016-10-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0011X
    Description:

    This overview for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) provides information on the purpose, content, methodology and products and services pertaining to SLID. Its HTML, menu-driven format enables users to discover all main elements of the survey in one, easy-to-use document. This publication was designed for survey respondents, users of SLID data, researchers and analysts, and individuals who would like to learn more about the survey.

    The SLID is an important source for income data for Canadian families, households and individuals. Introduced in 1993, SLID provides an added dimension to traditional surveys on labour market activity and income: the changes experienced by individuals and families through time. At the heart of the survey's objectives is the understanding of the economic well-being of Canadians. SLID also provides information on a broad selection of human capital variables, labour force experiences and demographic characteristics such as education, family relationships and household composition. Its breadth of content, combined with a relatively large sample, makes it a unique and valuable dataset.

    With this release, users now have free access to the 202 CANSIM Series tables. Tables are accessible using a PC or Mac via the web browser.

    Release date: 2013-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2013071
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2007 to 2011. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T-4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2013-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2010067
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2003 to 2009. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T-4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2010-11-10

  • Table: 13F0022X
    Description:

    This product contains 43 cross-classified income tables, covering the period 1976 to 2007. Most tables include estimates for Canada, the 10 provinces and 15 census metropolitan areas (CMAs). Major topics included in the tables are income distributions and inequality, earnings of men and women, income tax, government transfers, low income and sources of income.

    Beyond 20/20 software used in this product allows users to execute very easily common tasks done by analysts and researchers: browse rapidly data, select data of interest, graph or map them or simply save them in a worksheet. Then, from the instantaneous graph, it is very easy to find out trends and pull out highlights.

    Release date: 2009-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2008060
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2000 to 2007. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included for the first time. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2008-11-12

  • Stats in brief: 13-605-X20070019590
    Description:

    This note presents background and notes on the treatment in the National Accounts, including the Balance of Payments, of transactions resulting from the Softwood Lumber Agreement between Canada and the United States that was signed in October of 2006. Due to the unique nature of these transactions the note explains how funds were transacted and treated in various accounts of Canadian macro economic accounts.

    Release date: 2007-03-01
Data (13)

Data (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Table: 11-10-0054-01
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    This table provides individual taxation statistics, including effective tax and transfer rates, the total amount of taxes paid and government transfers received, and the proportion of Canadian taxfilers that pay tax or receive government transfers.

    Release date: 2021-11-12

  • Public use microdata: 62M0004X
    Description:

    The Public-Use Microdata File (PUMF) for the Survey of Household Spending (SHS) provides information on household expenditures as well as selected information on dwelling characteristics and household equipment. The production of this file includes many safeguards to prevent the identification of any one person or household.

    PUMFs were produced on an annual basis for SHS 1997 to 2009, before a redesigned survey was introduced with the 2010 reference year. The SHS 2017 PUMF is the first SHS PUMF based on data collected after the 2010 survey redesign.

    Due to changes to data collection, processing and estimation methods introduced with the 2010 redesign, users are advised not to compare data from SHS 1997 to 2009 with data from any subsequent years, unless otherwise noted.

    Release date: 2021-03-22

  • Table: 13F0022X
    Description:

    This product contains 43 cross-classified income tables, covering the period 1976 to 2007. Most tables include estimates for Canada, the 10 provinces and 15 census metropolitan areas (CMAs). Major topics included in the tables are income distributions and inequality, earnings of men and women, income tax, government transfers, low income and sources of income.

    Beyond 20/20 software used in this product allows users to execute very easily common tasks done by analysts and researchers: browse rapidly data, select data of interest, graph or map them or simply save them in a worksheet. Then, from the instantaneous graph, it is very easy to find out trends and pull out highlights.

    Release date: 2009-06-03

  • Table: 68-213-S
    Description:

    This publication presents detailed statistical tables, graphs and documentation supporting the public sector employment and finance data released in The Daily.

    Release date: 2006-06-15

  • Table: 82-570-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This is the second version of the Statistical report on the health of Canadians. Like the original in 1996, this report provides a comprehensive and detailed statistical overview of the health status of Canadians and the major determinants of that status. The original report was created for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Advisory Committee on Population Health, which has also commissioned this update. The broad purpose of the report is to help policy-makers and program planners identify priority issues and measure progress in the domain of population health.

    The Statistical report is meant to be a tool for learning as well as planning. The data identify populations at risk; suggest associations between health determinants, health status, and population characteristics; raise questions about the reasons for the widespread differences among the provinces and territories; and illustrate areas where Canada's health information system is robust, and others where it is relatively weak. These and other themes are touched on in the 11 section introductions of the Statistical Report and developed more fully in the companion publication, Toward a healthy future: second report on the health of Canadians. These publications are available at the Health Canada web site at: http://www.hc-sc.ca.

    Release date: 1999-09-16

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013562
    Description:

    Statistics Canada regularly produces data dealing with government finances, the deficit, and national accounting. Indeed, in a sense, these data have been one of the historical mainstays of all statistical organizations.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013563
    Description:

    Generational Accounting (GA) is a method of long-term public policy evaluation that attempts to measure what representative members of each current and future generation can expect to pay over their remaining lifetimes in net taxes. In this chapter we highlight the issues that arise from using GA to assess Canada's fiscal policy in terms of sustainability and overall impact on different age groups.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013565
    Description:

    A clear understanding of the size and extent of intergenerational transfers made by governments is central to any informed debate dealing with "Intergenerational Equity." Accordingly, the aim of this chapter is to provide a descriptive backdrop to these discussions by examining how current policy at all levels of government in Canada redistributes income among the different generations.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013567
    Description:

    Generational Accounting (GA) attempts to measure the degree of intergenerational redistribution that exists within a given fiscal and demographic structure. This approach produces a more comprehensive measure of the extent of intergenerational redistribution stemming from government programs than traditional measures that are based solely on government debt and deficits.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013568
    Description:

    Many governments have adopted policies aimed at reducing public debt. Although the long-run fiscal dividends of such policies largely depend on the size of the debt-to-GDP cut, the short and medium run effects are more dependent on the type and speed of measures taken.

    Release date: 1998-02-04
Analysis (40)

Analysis (40) (0 to 10 of 40 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202101100002
    Description:

    Postsecondary students can claim postsecondary education credits to lower their tax obligations (or that of a parent, grandparent, spouse or common-law partner, or their parent or grandparent). Claiming the credits is costless, but it does require knowledge of how the credits work to reduce taxes. As a result, claim rates may be unequal across socio-economic backgrounds, including the level of parental income (a key policy lever for needs-based student financial aid). The purpose of this article is to document claim rates among postsecondary students by level of parental income, as well as to re-assess trends in postsecondary enrolment rates by level of parental income in light of unequal claim rates. These trends were previously established with information on the tax credits in tax data. This study uses data from the T1 Family File (T1FF) and the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS), which have been recently linked for all ten provinces from 2009 onwards.

    Release date: 2021-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016003
    Description:

    Large national mortality cohorts are used to estimate mortality rates for different socioeconomic and population groups, and to conduct research on environmental health. In 2008, Statistics Canada created a cohort linking the 1991 Census to mortality. The present study describes a linkage of the 2001 Census long-form questionnaire respondents aged 19 years and older to the T1 Personal Master File and the Amalgamated Mortality Database. The linkage tracks all deaths over a 10.6-year period (until the end of 2011, to date).

    Release date: 2016-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2013071
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2007 to 2011. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T-4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2013-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2010067
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2003 to 2009. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T-4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2010-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2008060
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2000 to 2007. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included for the first time. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2008-11-12

  • Stats in brief: 13-605-X20070019590
    Description:

    This note presents background and notes on the treatment in the National Accounts, including the Balance of Payments, of transactions resulting from the Softwood Lumber Agreement between Canada and the United States that was signed in October of 2006. Due to the unique nature of these transactions the note explains how funds were transacted and treated in various accounts of Canadian macro economic accounts.

    Release date: 2007-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050118806
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Gasoline's share of consumer incomes rose both because of higher prices and increased consumption. The increase for household fuel was less onerous, as electricity rates have been more restrained. A number of industries, such as farming, forestry and travel are struggling with the rising cost of energy inputs.

    Release date: 2005-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005265
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We investigate how family earnings instability has evolved between the late 1980s and the late 1990s and how family income instability varies across segments of the (family-level) earnings distribution. We uncover four key patterns. First, among the subset of families who were intact over the 1982-1991 and 1992-2001 periods, family earnings instability changed little between the late 1980s and the late 1990s. Second, the dispersion of families' permanent earnings became much more unequal during that period. Third, families who were in the bottom tertile of the (age-specific) earnings distribution in 1992-1995 had, during the 1996-2001 period, much more unstable market income than their counterparts in the top tertile. Fourth, among families with husbands aged under 45, the tax and transfer system has, during the 1996-2001 period, eliminated at least two-thirds (and up to all) of the differences in instability (measured in terms of proportional income gains/losses) in family market income that were observed during that period between families in the bottom tertile and those in the top tertile. This finding highlights the key stabilization role played by the tax and transfer system, a feature that has received relatively little attention during the 1990s when Employment Insurance (EI) (formerly known as Unemployment Insurance (UI)) and Social Assistance were reformed.

    Release date: 2005-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005266
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: The Instability of Family Earnings and Family Income in Canada, 1986 to 1991 and 1996 to 2001. Despite its implications for family well-being, little attention has been paid to the analysis of earnings instability in the context of the family versus the earnings profiles of individuals. While a focus on individuals is important, the extent to which families can generate stable income flows from the labour market is a key concern for policymakers. Therefore, using data from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study documents how family earnings instability has evolved between two six-year periods: 1986-1991 and 1996-2001. We also examine how husbands' earnings instability compares to couples' earnings instability, and we compute measures of instability based on family earnings, family market income, and family income before and after tax. This allows us to examine the extent to which wives' earnings reduce the volatility of husbands' employment income; the extent to which the tax and transfer system plays a stabilization role; and the extent to which wives' earnings, taxes, and transfers reduce the differences in instability between couples in the bottom of the earnings distribution and those in the top.

    Release date: 2005-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510313137
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Local government revenues are increasingly perceived as inadequate to fund the program responsibilities of municipalities. Property taxes (residential and non-residential) are by far the most important revenue source, accounting for 35% in 2003 (up from 30% in 1988). But, residential property taxes are commonly viewed as regressive in relation to income. This study uses the 2001 Census of Population to quantify the regressiveness of residential property taxes in Canadian municipalities, and to examine whether regressive taxes are generally attributable to lower-income seniors living in high-priced homes.

    Release date: 2005-06-20
Reference (10)

Reference (10) ((10 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0011X
    Description:

    This overview for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) provides information on the purpose, content, methodology and products and services pertaining to SLID. Its HTML, menu-driven format enables users to discover all main elements of the survey in one, easy-to-use document. This publication was designed for survey respondents, users of SLID data, researchers and analysts, and individuals who would like to learn more about the survey.

    The SLID is an important source for income data for Canadian families, households and individuals. Introduced in 1993, SLID provides an added dimension to traditional surveys on labour market activity and income: the changes experienced by individuals and families through time. At the heart of the survey's objectives is the understanding of the economic well-being of Canadians. SLID also provides information on a broad selection of human capital variables, labour force experiences and demographic characteristics such as education, family relationships and household composition. Its breadth of content, combined with a relatively large sample, makes it a unique and valuable dataset.

    With this release, users now have free access to the 202 CANSIM Series tables. Tables are accessible using a PC or Mac via the web browser.

    Release date: 2013-06-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via paper questionnaires and personal interviews conducted in January, February and March after the reference year. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces and the 3 territories. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2002-12-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15F0077G
    Description:

    This publication provides a description of the data sources and methods used to compile the input-output tables at constant prices. It includes a brief description of the accounting framework, an overview of the methods used for the major components of the tables and an outline of the techniques applied to each group of goods and services. It also distinguishes between the derivation of the gross domestic product by industry for the business sector and that of the non-business sector. Finally, it discusses some of the critical contemporary issues that are being addressed at the time of writing.

    Release date: 2001-02-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2000011
    Description:

    This report summarizes the comments received in response to a discussion paper on low income cut-offs released in January 2000.

    Release date: 2000-09-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2000002
    Description:

    This paper deals with a problem in internationally comparable economic statistics, namely, the fact that countries measure value added by industry differently. The economic measure, value added, is important both in its own right and because it is a component of other economic measures such as productivity. Value added by industry measures the additional value created by a production process. This additional value, created by factors of production such as labour and capital, may be calculated either before or after deducting the consumption of fixed capital used in production. Thus, gross value added by industry is the value of its output of goods and services less the value of its intermediate consumption of goods and services and net value added as the value of output less the values of both intermediate consumption and consumption of fixed capital.

    Release date: 2000-04-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1998012
    Description:

    This paper looks at the work of the task force responsible for reviewing Statistics Canada's household and family income statistics programs, and at one of associated program changes, namely, the integration of two major sources of annual income data in Canada, the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) and the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2000005
    Description:

    This report presents the changes made to one of the most important series, the current price gross domestic product (GDP). It includes 13 tables, one for each of the following topics:

    personal expenditure on consumer goods and services;government current expenditure on goods and services; gross fixed capital formation, residential structures;gross fixed capital formation, non-residential structures;gross fixed capital formation, machinery and equipment;exports and imports of goods and services;wages, salaries and supplementary labour income; net income of unincorporated business; indirect taxes;subsidies; current price GDP expenditure; current price GDP income; and GDP changes, significant Items.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1997006
    Description:

    This report documents the edit and imputation approach taken in processing Wave 1 income data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1997-12-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1994008
    Description:

    This document describes the survey content for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income data questionnaire and explains the interview process.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1995012
    Description:

    This paper describes the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income data collection procedures and provides an overview of the interview process. May 1995 was the first year respondents could choose to carry out the interview as in the previous year, or they could grant permission for Statistics Canada to access their income tax returns from Revenue Canada and forego the interview.

    Release date: 1995-12-30
Date modified: