Health Reports

A Canadian peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research

December 2023

Profiles of burnout and work engagement in a public service organization: Nature, drivers, and outcomes

by Ann-Renée Blais, Glen T. Howell, István Tóth-Király and Simon A. Houle

Longstanding research in organizational psychology, occupational health, and other disciplines in the social sciences has established the importance of employee psychological health for organizations, irrespective of their sector or size. With two-thirds of Canadians spending 60% or more of their time at work, it is no surprise that research has also demonstrated the significance of employee psychological health to their mental health and functioning. Employee psychological health has become even more crucial, in light of the wide-ranging consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on individuals, organizations, and governments around the world. For example, the prevalence of self-reported anxiety and depression has more than doubled in the Canadian population since the beginning of the pandemic, while the prevalence of self-reported positive mental health outcomes has declined.

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Profiles of burnout and work engagement in a public service organization: Nature, drivers, and outcomes

Are “immortals” an issue for survival estimates derived from Canadian Cancer Registry data?

by Larry F. Ellison

Population-based cancer survival estimates form one pillar of a comprehensive cancer surveillance program with which progress in cancer control may be monitored. The derivation of these estimates requires survival time information, which is often obtained through “passive” follow-up. This typically involves the record linkage of cancer registry cases to one or more sources of death information to ascertain the vital status of patients at various follow-up times. Cases not linked to a death are presumed to be alive. To the extent that the linkage process fails to match cancer cases to corresponding deaths, survival estimates may be overestimated. Such non-matched cases seemingly live on forever and are informally referred to as “immortals.”

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Are “immortals” an issue for survival estimates derived from Canadian Cancer Registry data?

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