Health Reports

A Canadian peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research

July 2019

Comparison of self-reported and accelerometer-measured physical activity among Canadian youth

by Rachel C. Colley, Gregory Butler, Didier Garriguet, Stephanie A. Prince and Karen C. Roberts

Physical activity is positively associated with a wide range of physical, psychological, social and cognitive health outcomes in children and youth. Self-report questionnaires are cost-efficient and provide important contextual information about physical activity, but are limited by recall bias and variation in reporting accuracy for different intensities and domains. Accelerometers overcome some of these limitations. However, they do not capture certain types of movement accurately (e.g., cycling, load bearing). Nor do they provide any contextual information about the type or domain of physical activity participation. This information is important for conducting surveillance as it identifies the types and domains of physical activity that are contributing the most and the least to overall physical activity levels. Capturing this contextual information may be particularly challenging in youth, given the more sporadic nature of how they accumulate physical activity throughout the day.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Comparison of self-reported and accelerometer-measured physical activity among Canadian youth

Infant bed sharing in Canada

by Heather Gilmour, Pamela L. Ramage-Morin and Suzy L. Wong

There continues to be debate about bed sharing—the practice of an infant sharing a sleep surface with an adult or other child. Some studies suggest there is an increased risk of infant death, while others find no increased risk in the absence of hazards such as soft surfaces, extra bedding or pillows, smoking, impairment or sleeping with a non-caregiver. Proponents of bed sharing point to potential physical and psychological benefits, such as facilitating breastfeeding and promoting bonding. Some guidelines aim to eliminate the risks by advising against any form of bed sharing. Others focus on harm reduction by educating parents so that they can make informed decisions to minimize the risks associated with bed sharing.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Changes in beverage consumption in Canada

by Didier Garriguet

Beverage consumption, especially water, is critical to a healthy diet. It not only provides hydration, but can also be an important source of energy, vitamins and minerals—depending on the type of beverage consumed. For the first time in over a decade, food and beverage consumption was measured through a 24-hour recall in the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) – Nutrition. Earlier comparisons between the 2004 CCHS – Nutrition and the 2015 CCHS – Nutrition show that changes in energy intake and total sugars intake can be partly explained by changing patterns in beverage consumption.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Changes in beverage consumption in Canada

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